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‘We do not want to start a civil war’: Fight grows over seasonal access to cottages during COVID-19


The approach of Victoria Day long weekend — the starting pistol for cottage travel for many in Ontario and across the country — coinciding with a deadly pandemic brings fear of “a civil war” between cottagers and residents of Canada’s waterfront regions.

With concerns that cottage owners from cities with higher COVID-19 caseloads may spread the coronavirus or drain the small grocery and health-care resources of rural communities, the usually warm welcome for summer residents is in a deep chill.

“There is lots of tension between the seasonal and the permanent residents,” said Chris Peabody, mayor of Brockton, Ontario, 190 kilometres northwest of Toronto, which is bisected by the Saugeen River, popular with canoeists and anglers.

“We do not want to start a civil war with our cottagers.”

For some, conflict is already here.

There are some people who are fearful for their lives. They’re really scared

Some popular destinations have issued a ban against cottage owners coming to their property; others discourage cottagers by shutting off their water or closing boat ramps. Others are just pleading with cottagers to stay away.

“It’s a struggle we are all facing as mayors. It is not fun times,” said Mitch Twolan, mayor of Huron-Kinross in southwestern Ontario, which includes a stretch of Lake Huron waterfront. In March he ordered water service to seasonal properties shut off.

“I get it: people want to get away to some form of semblance of their regular life, to put everything else behind. But that’s where the angst is, because for their self-comfort and their mental health and wellbeing they come and they put their thoughts ahead of people who are here year-round.

“There are some people who are fearful for their lives. They’re really scared. We do have folks that decided that, in their best interests they have a right, because they’re a taxpayer, to drive back and forth. So you try to make a decision, it’s the not the most popular decision all the time.”

For Twolan, it is not theoretical.

He said a cottager from Kitchener-Waterloo region was treated in the area’s hospital in Kincardine and later tested positive for COVID-19, sending three or four nurses home for 14 days of quarantine.

“That was what we are all scared of and it happened,” Twolan said.

Many seasonal property owners are pushing back.

Bill Armstrong, who lives in Aurora, north of Toronto, owns a cottage on Horse Island in Carling Township, not far from Ontario’s Killbear Provincial Park, which requires a boat to get to. The municipality has closed boat ramps, leaving him unable to get to his second home, he said.

In response, he is sending regular “invoices” to the township for its “rental” of his cottage at $1,500 a week. He said he also plans to hold the township liable for preventing him from checking his property after the winter, as his insurance policy requires.

“We’re all just fuming,” he said. He warned that if cottagers aren’t welcome now, cottagers might not want to spend their money in the communities in the future.


“I get it: people want to get away to some form of semblance of their regular life, to put everything else behind.”

Peter Redman/Ntional Post/File

Allane Andrusko, a cottage owner in Prince Edward County, said if the municipality bans cottagers from their property it will spark a legal fight.

“I will initiate a small claims court action requesting a refund of all fixed costs for the period they told me to stay away and then ordered me to stay away. This includes taxes, insurance and hydro.”

David Kreaden, a Toronto medical doctor and cottage owner, argued it is safer to stay in his cottage.

“It is much easier to isolate in the cottage setting than it is in a high-rise in Toronto having to use the elevator multiple times a day,” he said. He disputed suggestions he might be a burden on local health care if he has COVID-19: “I daresay it would prompt a quick return to the city.”

Complaints of seasonal owners are not drawing sympathy from many permanent residents.

“We don’t need any extra pressures on our modest hospitals,” said Brian Burke, a resident of Norfolk County in southern Ontario, where the medical officer of health has issued an emergency health order banning seasonal owners from occupying their property.

“Staring at our COVID numbers the past few weeks, the thought of even something as simple as someone from out of town falling off their bicycle and breaking their arm is terrifying — we simply don’t have any room for error here.”

We’re all just fuming

Other residents use social media to try to shame out-of-towners by posting photos of tourists stocking up in local stores.

Cottage country mayors are looking to the Ontario government to bring province-wide rules before the Victoria Day weekend, several said.

Premier Doug Ford, who will be speaking with cottage country mayors this week, said he won’t bring in a ban.

“You have to give a little leniency. If you put down the hammer and say you just aren’t coming, well, people aren’t going to listen,” Ford said.

That sentiment is reflected in a memo dated May 3 from Dr. David Williams, Ontario’s chief medical officer, sent to municipal medical officers of health, obtained by National Post.

“My current recommendation is to not prohibit access to secondary residences through legal order, but to continue to provide communications that discourage their use,” it says.

Williams also advised against medical officers of health issuing broad prohibitions against access to seasonal property under the Health Protection and Promotion Act, as was done in Haldimand and Norfolk counties.

Ford said his a message to cottage country is: “Be prepared, people are coming up on May the 24th.”

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#Brexit – ‘We are ready to start the next phase, to defend and promote Europe’s interests’ #EUCO


 

The decisive victory by the British Conservatives in yesterday’s general election was widely and enthusiastically welcomed by European leaders attending today’s (13 December) European Council.

Luxembourg’s Prime Minister Xavier Bettel said that they welcomed the certainty that the election provided and said that it had been difficult when things had been agreed in Brussels, then rejected by the House of Commons. Bettel added that it is also time for Boris to deliver.

The President of the European Council Charles Michel said that the EU is ready to start the next phase: “We are ready also to defend and to promote the European interest the level-playing field is a very important goal for us.”

The President of the European Commission underlined that the timeframe to reach an agreement in the second phase was going to be very challenging, she said that the EU will be ready to get the most out of the short period available. Von der Leyen was keen emphasise that while the UK would become a third country, she hoped that the UK would enjoy an unprecedented partnership with the EU. She also said that she hoped for a deal that was: “no tariffs, no quotas, no dumping.” The reference to ‘dumping’ refers to the guaranteeing of minimum standards in several fields including state aid, environmental and consumer standards, social rights and other fields. She also added that we should “care” for the 3.5 million European citizens living in the UK.

Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar congratulates Prime Minister Johnson on and “an enormous victory for him […] and for his party.” Varadkar also welcomed the clear majority the PM enjoys and hopes that it will help in swiftly ratifying the Withdrawal Agreement. Varadkar reminded us that the agreement would guarantee no hard border between North and South, the protection of the common travel area, and the protection of British and Irish citizen’s rights.

Varadkar said it was also important to work with Prime Minister Johnson on getting the Northern Ireland executive and assembly up and running again and that this will have to be a key priority for the next couple of weeks.

All leaders, including French President Emmanuel Macron were optimistic about an ambitious trade deal, but all made it clear that the deal would be conditional. However, it is already clear that many countries will have very specific red lines. On her way into the European Council, Danish Prime Minister said that she would insist on access to British waters for fishing.

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Category: A Frontpage, Brexit, EU, EU, European Commission, European Parliament, UK





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Stream and TV channel as Greenwood and Garner start at Old Trafford – latest updates – The Sun


MAN UTD welcome AZ Alkmaar to Old Trafford looking for a third-straight victory in all competitions.

Both of these sides have already booked their place in the knockout stages, but top-spot in Group L is still up for grabs.

The visitors need to take all three points to snatch it from Ole’s men, whilst Utd only need to avoid defeat.

Follow all the action as it happens from Old Trafford below…

  • Kick-off time: 8pm
  • Venue: Old Trafford, Manchester
  • TV/Live stream: BT Sport2/BT Sport app or free for EE customers
  • Man Utd XI: Romero, Young, Tuanzebe, Maguire, Williams, Matic, Garner, Andreas, Mata, Martial, Greenwood.
  • Alkmaar XI: Bizot, Svensson, Clasie, Wuytens, Midtsjo, Stengs, Wijndal, Koopmeiners, Idrissi, Sugawara, De Wit.





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Canadiens Game Day: Keith Kinkaid will start in goal vs. Flyers


Keith Kinkaid will start in goal Saturday afternoon when the Canadiens take on the Philadelphia Flyers at the Bell Centre (3 p.m., SN, RDS, TSN 690 Radio) looking to end a six-game winless streak (0-4-2).

When Canadiens coach Claude Julien met the media at 12:45 p.m. at the Bell Centre he said that Carey Price will start Sunday when they Canadiens play the Bruins in Boston (7 p.m., SN, RDS, TSN 690 Radio).

The Canadiens have allowed 20 goals in their last three games — all losses on home ice — and are coming off a 6-4 loss to the New Jersey Devils Thursday night.

“It’s pretty simple … we got three games in four nights,” Julien said when asked to explain his goaltending decision. “Boston tomorrow gives an opportunity for Carey to get a little bit of rest. He’s played quite a bit. Again, those back-to-back games Carey, to me, has always played well in Boston. So there’s no reason why we don’t give him that rest and we don’t give Kinkaid an opportunity here tonight. So to me it’s a calculated decision on our part and we’re going forward with that.”

The Canadiens have an 11-9-5 record and are in 12th place in the Eastern Conference. The Flyers (14-7-5) are coming off a 6-1 win over the Detroit Red Wings Friday afternoon in Philadelphia and are in third place in the Metropolitan Division.

When asked what his message is to his players as they try to end their six-game winless streak, Julien said: “Same thing as what most coaches would normally say: less is more. Don’t try and do somebody else’s job. Trust the people you’re out there with to do their jobs and once that comes back everything kind of falls into place. Right now everybody wants to win so badly, they see a little mistake they want to cover up right away and sometimes they don’t give that guy a chance to cover his mistake. We just need a little bit of patience and trust and I think if those two things happen I think it’s going to change the outcome of our defensive game a lot.”

This is the second of three games between these teams this season after the Flyers beat the Canadiens 3-2 in overtime on Nov. 7 in Philadelphia. They will wrap up the season series on Jan. 16 in Philadelphia.

Olofsson will make Canadiens debut

Defenceman Gustav Olofsson, called up from the AHL’s Laval Rocket on Friday, will make his Canadiens debut against the Flyers on the third pairing with Cale Fleury.

That means Mike Reilly and Brett Kulak will be the healthy scratches.

In 20 games with the Rocket this season, Olofsson had 0-7-7 totals and was plus-1.

“From what I’ve seen and what I’ve been told, overall he’s been playing well,” Julien said about Olofsson. “He skates the puck, moves the puck well. He’s a guy that has a little bit of experience in this league.”

The Canadiens acquired the 24-year-old Olofsson from the Minnesota Wild on Oct. 3, 2018 in exchange for forward William Bitten. Olofsson played only two games for the Rocket last season before having season-ending shoulder surgery. The 6-foot-3, 200-pounder played 56 games with the Wild over three seasons, posting 0-11-11 totals. The Wild selected the Swedish defenceman in the second round (46th overall) of the 2013 NHL Draft.

“The injury last year really set him back,” Julien said. “So now he’s got about 20 games under his belt (in Laval) and seems to be coming around. In the circumstance that we’re in right now, I think it’s a great opportunity to see if he can help us out and bring a dimension to our back end that we can certainly use right now. So we’re going to have a look at him this afternoon and hopefully be able to come out of this with a real good evaluation of him.

Longest slump in two seasons

The Canadiens’ six-game winless streak is their longest season and is one game longer than their longest slump last season, when they went 0-3-2 from Nov. 19-27.

The last time the Canadiens had a six-game winless streak was two seasons ago when they went 0-4-2 from Feb. 8-20. They also had a seven-game winless streak that season, going 0-6-1 from Oct. 7-20. The Canadiens finished 28th in the overall NHL standings that season.

“It’s a long season,” the Canadiens’ Max Domi said Friday morning at the Bell Sports Complex in Brossard. “It’s how it goes, right? You’re going to go through, obviously, ups and downs throughout a year. We know that there’s no one who wants to win more than the guys in this locker room. So we’re doing everything we possibly can and it’s something we’re going to have to stick together. We’re a real close group and we believe in one another and we believe in each other. Keep doing that, keep working hard and just trust the process here. We just got to get one win and then go from there.”

Sense of urgency

There’s a sense of urgency surrounding the Canadiens heading into the back-to-back games this weekend.

“We have the same urgency for every game,” Domi said Friday. “We want to win every game. It doesn’t matter if it’s October or hopefully in June. That’s our goal. So every game’s the same and you got to elevate your performance and your compete level and all that on a daily basis. All we’re focused on is tomorrow against Philly. We haven’t won a game in a while and we got to win the next game against Philly. That’s all we’re focused on right now.

“We’re a team here,” Domi added. “We’re going to stick together and every guy’s got to pull their weight. Obviously, we can be a lot better for Carey. We know that and he knows that, too. So we got to be better for each other and as a team, I think as a whole, when we’re all going we’re a tough team to play against. That’s all we can control so we got to find ways to get back to that.”

Supporting Price

Kinkaid has been doing his best to support Price during this tough stretch for the No. 1 goalie.

“I think just motivate him,” Kinkaid said Friday morning when asked what he can do to help Price as his backup. “Give friendly competition. Give stick taps on big saves in practice and whatnot. He does that constantly to me. So he’s been great with that … even saves that I think are relatively routine,  you hear him at the other end tapping his stick

“I think it’s just being encouraging,” Kinkaid added. “He knows what to do. He’s a top-notch professional. He’s the best in the game. Everyone goes through this, so it’s nothing we’re going to stress about. We just got to get out of it and sometimes it’s ugly when you get out of it, but you need that ugly game to get over the hump I think.”

Kinkaid was also asked about Price breaking his stick in frustration after giving up the fifth goal in Thursday night’s loss to the Devils.

“That was just maybe a shot he knows he can save,” Kinkaid said. “Right now, like I said, people go through this. Even I know there’s a few shots I should have saved during the season, like the one (game) in Vegas. I let in two shots I knew I should have and we still got the win (5-4 in overtime). It’s just getting back to the basics, focusing on keeping your body in front of the puck and tracking everything. I know (goalie coach Stéphane Waite) worked great with him. He’s been working great with me to help my game, too. So I’m not worried for us at all. We’ve been resilient to start the season and we’ll come out of this.”

Where the Canadiens rank

The Canadiens rank ninth in the NHL in offence, scoring an average of 3.32 goals per game, and 29th in defence, allowing an average of 3.52. They rank 17th on the power play (18. 4 per cent), 30th in penalty-killing (72.7 per cent) and 15th in faceoffs (50.1 per cent).

Tomas Tatar leads the Canadiens in scoring with 7-15-22 totals, followed by Shea Weber (8-12-20), Brendan Gallagher (10-9-29), Phillip Danault (6-12-18) and Domi (6-11-17).

Where the Flyers rank

The Flyers rank 14th in the NHL in offence, scoring an average of 3.00 goals per game, and rank sixth in defence, allowing an average of 2.69. They rank 11th on the power play (20.2 per cent), third in penalty-killing (86.5 per cent) and first in faceoffs (53.9 per cent).

Travis Konecny leads the Flyers in scoring with 8-16-24 totals, followed by Sean Couturier (8-12-20), Jakub Voracek (6-13-19), Claude Giroux (8-10-18) and Oskar Lindblom (10-7-17).

What’s next?

The Canadiens will fly to Boston after Saturday’s game and play the Bruins Sunday night (7 p.m., SN, RDS, TSN 690 Radio).

Next week, the New York Islanders will be at the Bell Centre on Tuesday (7 p.m., TSN2, RDS, TSN 690 Radio), followed by the Colorado Avalanche on Thursday (7 p.m., TSN2, RDS, TSN 690 Radio) before the Canadiens travel to New York to face the Rangers next Friday (7 p.m., TSN2, RDS, TSN 690 Radio).

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