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Keith Lemon shares sweet video of Caroline Flack


Keith found a video of Caroline Flack on his phone this week

Keith Lemon has shared a sweet video he’s found of his friend Caroline Flack, months after her tragic death.

The Celebrity Juice host found a clip on his phone on Thursday of Caroline – who died on 15 February – debating whether she should be wearing her hair up or down before an appearance.

It’s a simple exchange, but fans were quick to share in Keith’s mourning as they commented on how much they, too, miss the bubbly TV personality.

Keith began the video by introducing us to the scene: ‘Right now I’m in Caroline Flack’s dressing room.’

As the camera moved to the former Love Island presenter, she said: ‘I’m looking in the mirror because I’m trying to work out what to do with my hair.’

‘It looks nice!’ Keith enthused as Caroline asked: ‘Up or down?’

As Keith says ‘both’ Caroline pressed: ‘What do you think looks better?’

He continued: ‘What did you have it down yesterday….have it up then?’ as someone adds in the background: ‘Up’s nice.’

Caroline was wondering what to do with her hair (Picture: Instagram)

He captioned the clip on Instagram: ‘Found this on my phone this morning. Up or down always looked nice. Miss Caroline’s posts on insta. Miss her more in real life. X’

Fans reacted to the piece with an abundance of love, as one referenced Caroline’s Bo’ Selecta! character: ‘Adorable! RIP Bubbles.’

Another shared a sweet sentiment by adding: ‘Will always Love her 💕 👼’

Loving the discovery, one fan commented: ‘Awwww lovely Caroline. So sad. Lovely little surprise find there.’

Keith and Caroline were tight – after she was launched into homes around the world via his show Bo’ Selecta! in 2002 – with the comedian, real name Leigh Francis, launching a line of tees with ‘Be Kind’ printed on the front to crackdown on social media trolls after Caroline died by suicide earlier this year.

More: Caroline Flack

The t-shirt design features an image of Caroline by photographer Rachell Smith, who snapped the presenter for a Cosmopolitan magazine feature in 2019.

MORE: Laura Whitmore admits Caroline Flack’s death ‘scared’ her and hopes everyone will ‘learn’ from it

MORE: Dawn O’Porter pays tribute to the late Caroline Flack: ‘That laugh, That humour, That loyalty’





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Abba star Bjorn Ulvaeus shares message of hope during Eurovision show


Abba star Bjorn Ulvaeus has hailed the Eurovision Song Contest as an “escape” during the coronavirus pandemic, as it was announced that the event would return to Rotterdam next year.

he final of the 65th edition of the event was due to take place on Saturday night in the city in the Netherlands, but was cancelled due to the outbreak.

Ulvaeus, 75, appeared in a pre-recorded video message during the final moments of Eurovision: Shine A Light on BBC One.

Recalling Abba’s win in Brighton with Waterloo in 1974, he said: “The ESC is one hell of a launching pad.

“And it still remains one of the most genuinely joyous event of the TV era and it is so disarmingly European. It also allows you to escape and be happy.

“Everybody knows why there couldn’t be the usual Eurovision final this year.

“But we hope this show will comfort you in some small way, knowing that it will be back next year.

“Very good title by the way – Shine A Light. I’m glad they didn’t choose Waterloo. Long live the Eurovision Song Contest.”

It was also announced that the contest would take place in Rotterdam in 2021, after its producer, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), and its Dutch members NPO, NOS and AVROTROS, reached an agreement.

Martin Osterdahl, Eurovision’s executive supervisor, said in a statement: “We are extremely happy that we can now move forward.

“It’s vitally important that the Eurovision Song Contest returns next year, and we’re pleased to have the necessary commitment from our Members in the Netherlands to bring this much-loved show back to audiences across the world.

“I firmly believe that all of us involved in the Eurovision Song Contest will stand united through challenges and change to bring the Contest back stronger than ever, ensuring its longevity for decades to come.”

Shine A Light was organised to honour all the 41 songs which would have made up this year’s contest, in a non-competitive format, and featured the acts covering Katrina And The Waves’ Love Shine A Light.

It also saw host Graham Norton struggle with a time delay as he spoke to the programme’s main hosts via video-call.

Afterwards, he said: “God, that was awkward. Well, here we are now, back on. But I did mean it, I have found this strangely emotional, this whole evening.”

It followed the BBC’s replacement coverage, also hosted by Norton, in which viewers voted Abba’s song Waterloo as the greatest Eurovision entry.

The track came out top from a list of 19 acts, selected by a panel featuring broadcasters Ken Bruce, Rylan Clark-Neal, Scott Mills and Mel Giedroyc.

The special programme, titled Eurovision: Come Together, saw Norton pay tribute to Sir Terry Wogan, who he succeeded as host of the BBC’s Eurovision coverage.

He told viewers: “I know this isn’t real Eurovision but this is song nine, and it is a tradition that we raise a glass on song nine for the late Sir Terry Wogan.

“As we look back over 64 years of Eurovision, I am sure that for many of you, Sir Terry was a highlight over the years. So we think of him and raise a glass.”

Norton marked song nine because Sir Terry once warned him not to drink alcohol before that point in the contest, in order to stay alert.

UK entries such as Making Your Mind Up by Bucks Fizz, from 1981, and Love Shine A Light by Katrina And The Waves, from 1997, were among the list.

The series also featured an interview with James Newman, who was due to flag the flag for the UK at this year’s content.

Newman, brother of pop star John Newman, was hoping to improve the country’s prospects at the annual event after Michael Rice placed last in 2019 with Bigger Than Us.

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James Newman (Victor Frankowski/BBC/PA)

Speaking via videolink, he recalled the moment he found out the contest had been cancelled.

He said: “It was before lockdown and me and my wife were just out for a drive actually. We’d just been out to get some shopping and stuff. And then I got a text and they were like: ‘It’s cancelled.’ I had to have a few minutes to myself.”

He tipped Iceland’s Think About Things by Dadi Og Gagnamagnid as the entry he had been looking forward to seeing.

PA Media



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Saudi Aramco becomes world’s biggest listed company as shares surge 10% – business live | Business


A screen advertising Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil company Aramco with Arabic reads, “promising future” in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, this week

A screen advertising Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil company Aramco with Arabic reads, “promising future” in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, this week Photograph: Amr Nabil/AP

Good morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of the world economy, the financial markets, the eurozone and business.

It’s a massive day on the Saudi stock market as oil giant Aramco finally makes its debut — becoming the biggest listed company in the world.

Saudi Aramco is floating today, after raising $25.6bn through its sometime troubled IPO. That valued the company at $1.7trillion – even more than Apple ($1.2 trillion).

The opening auction on the Tadawul is underway as I type, so we’ll soon know if the float is a success.

If Aramco’s shares rally today, then the $2trillion valuation craved by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman could be in sight again.

But it’s an usual float – just 1.5% of Aramco’s stock is actually floating. The rest is owned by the Saudi state.

That scarcity could help push the stock higher, after international investors proved reluctant to back the IPO.

Human rights concerns, the climate crisis, and corporate government concerns all forced the Saudis to rein in their ambitious plans for the float, and restrict it to Middle East investors.

As my colleague Jillian Ambrose explains:


It was originally expected to sell about 5% through a dual-listing on the Saudi market and on a major international stock exchange.

The IPO lost the support of international investors, which are sceptical of the company’s valuation. Investors are also wary of Aramco’s close ties to the Saudi regime, which is embroiled in geopolitical conflict and whose behaviour has raised human rights concerns.
Among local investors demand for Aramco shares was almost three times oversubscribed after the Saudi government encouraged Middle Eastern investors and wealthy Saudi families to support the IPO.

Aramco’s shares were sold at 32 riyals each. The stock should start trading soon, so we’ll see if it spikes or slides…..

Also coming up today

The City is becoming more anxious about tomorrow’s general election.

A closely-watched poll from YouGov showed Boris Johnson’s likely majority has narrowed – from 68 seats to just 28. A hung parliament is still a real possibility, which knocked sterling a little last night.

The pound is trading around $1.3135 this morning, having hit $1.32 last night (before YouGov hit the wires).

Plus, America’s central bank is holding its last (scheduled) meeting of 2019, but we’re not expecting fireworks.

The agenda

  • 12.30pm GMT: US inflation: Expected to rise to 2.0% per year, from 1.8%
  • 3.30pm GMT: US weekly oil inventories
  • 7pm GMT: US Federal Reserve decision: expected to leave interest rates unchanged



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Alibaba shares set to rise 6.3% in Hong Kong debut



Alibaba Group’s Hong Kong shares are set to rise 6.3% in their debut after marking the city’s biggest share sale in nine years, Trend reports citing Reuters.

Alibaba has raised at least $11.3 billion from the secondary listing and could go as high as $12.9 billion if an over-allotment option is exercised.

The company sold the shares at HK$176, which was a 2.9% discount to the company’s closing price in New York last Tuesday. Each American Depository Receipt (ADR) represents eight Hong Kong shares.

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