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Search for diver who disappeared after jumping off a cliff into a Quebec lake – Montreal



The search resumed Sunday morning with the help of divers from the Sûreté du Québc (SQ), to find a swimmer who dived into a lake in Harrington in the Laurentians and hasn’t been seen since his friends lost sight of him.

Police were notified at around 6 p.m. on Saturday that a young man in his 20s was missing after an outing with friends at Grand MacDonald Lake near Deer Head Road.

READ MORE: St-Lazare family raises awareness about pool safety; Quebec sees spike in drownings

“He allegedly jumped off a cliff into Lake MacDonald. He later surfaced and swam back to their boat, but his friends lost sight of him and he hasn’t been seen since,” said Valérie Beauchamp, spokesperson for the Sûreté du Québec.

Firefighters searched the water with their boats all evening while SQ patrollers scoured the shores and surroundings of the lake, but to no avail. The search was suspended around 8:45 p.m. and resumed in daylight on Sunday, this time with the help of SQ divers.

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Team GB sprinter considers stop and search legal action, as scenes of ‘driving while black’ spread across social media – Channel 4 News


The Metropolitan Police have urged the Team GB sprinter Bianca Williams and her partner to get in touch – and discuss an incident where they were stopped and searched while driving in west London.

The couple claim they were racially profiled – and while the police say each stop is made on its own merits, they are confident there were no misconduct issues but want to consider what they could have done differently.

This programme has also learnt that the Met have made a voluntary referral to the Independent Office for Police Conduct – following a separate complaint by a 21-year-old key worker accusing the same unit of racial profiling.



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12 Google search tricks you’ll wish you knew sooner


Recently I offered privacy-focused alternatives for the most common Google services from search to mail. Tap or click here for that list.

Still, let’s be honest: I know you use Google. You probably use Netflix, too, but did you know there are lots of free alternatives once you run out of shows to stream? Tap or click for a list of free streaming services worth checking out.

Whether it’s Netflix, Google, Facebook or any other site or service, there are always new tricks to learn. If you never realized you could run two searches simultaneously or convert your screen to Klingon, read on.

Google will grant you access to pretty much all of human knowledge, but even that is only the tip of the iceberg.

1. Try these advanced search features

Everybody knows how to do a regular search on Google. But skilled researchers prefer the advanced search function, which helps you refine your results. You can find websites with specific words, precise phrases, numbers, languages and regions, among other parameters.

During your first search attempt, click or tap Settings just below and to the right of the main text field and look for Advanced Search. You’ll see multiple search fields. There, you can filter your searches in any number of ways.

If you can’t find something on a specific website because their search function is lacking, there’s a field in Google’s Advanced Search where you can search by site or domain. For media, you can search by image size or aspect ratio, color, search by site or even filter results by usage rights.

Google has dozens of hidden gems, including these 10 hidden search features that you’ll want to try.

YOUR SECRET WEAPON: Get my tech tricks, digital advice and security tips to your inbox twice a week. Tap or click here to try The Current, my new ad-free newsletter.

2. Quick and easy search methods

If you don’t need all the filters that come with Advanced Search, you can use several shortcuts for regular searches. For example, if you’re looking for something exact, add quotation marks to the word or phrase (e.g., “The Last Dance”).

Do you need to exclude a word? Place a minus sign (-) in front of the word you don’t want.

Throw a plus sign (+) in front of any word you want to stress as important.

You can also search a site directly by placing site: directly in front of the URL, then follow it with your search term. So it would look like this: site:komando.com “google” You can use the same method to search for related content (related:).

Put @ in front of a word to search social media, or add # in front to search hashtags. Use * in place of an unknown word or as a placeholder. You can even search within a range of numbers like this: 2002..2018.

RELATED: While we’re talking social media, you’re the only one who can control what others learn about you via the web. Tap or click for 10 Facebook settings you really should double-check.

3. Stay up to date, the easy way

Do you want a quick look at today’s weather? Presuming your device knows where you are, Google the word “weather” and you’ll get a detailed daily forecast along with outlooks for the coming days. You can also type “weather in Atlanta,” or any other point on the map, and you’ll receive a detailed meteorological update.

Sure, Google can tell you the forecast, but I rely on a site the pros use to predict storms, plan flights and more. Tap or click to try Windy.

4. Math made simple

Don’t want to hunt for the calculator app? Just type your math problem or equation into the search field to turn Google into a basic calculator. You can also type “calculator” into the search field, and one will materialize.

Google can also convert currency and help you with Geometry problems. Just type “solve” and fill the rest. Google can even chart graphs.

5. The final countdown

This skill is shockingly useful, especially in the kitchen. Just Google “timer” and it’ll bring up a default countdown clock of five minutes; you can quickly change it to your needed duration. Click or tap the upper tab, and it becomes a stopwatch.

6. Find the origins of a word

Many people use Google as a dictionary, typing a word and then “definition” into the search engine. But more than a simple entry, Google also serves up synonyms, antonyms, and (often) the etymology of the word – that is, the word’s origins.

So if you love to know that “night” comes from Old English “neaht,” you could play this lingual game all day.

7. A handy translator

Select the language you need to translate, then search for any word or phrase. Google Translate works for more than 100 languages across the globe. While you can convert the search engine to Klingon, though, there’s still no translation support.

Want to learn another language? Today’s smart AI-powered apps can help. Tap or click for the best options out there.

8. Run two searches at the same time

Most of us have only ever thought to look for one search term at a time; first, we look for “Paris,” then we look for “History of Aviation.”

If you’re not quite sure what you’re looking for, Google can combine searches. All you need to do is add your search terms and separate them by “and” or “or.”

Like what you’re reading? Get more info like this delivered to your inbox. Sign-up here on my site.

9. Metronome, anyone?

This one’s geared to musicians. If you need a little help with your music, let Google’s metronome assist. You can determine the beats per minute (BPM) that you prefer, and Google will provide perfectly spaced ticks.

10. Google newspaper archive

Far from the clumsy microfiche of your local library, Google has archived thousands of newspapers as scanned PDFs, many of them dating back to the American Revolution.

You’ll find newspapers from around the world, in a range of languages. Some collections are incomplete, but amateur historians will rejoice at this treasure trove of archived materials.

11. Play games

Did you know there are a few games you can play just using a simple search? Search Pac-Man, and the iconic arcade game will fire up, free for anyone to use.

Other games, like Atari Breakout and Zerg Rush, are also available to play directly through the browser, whenever you need a quick thrill.

12. See retro Google

As you may know, Google was founded (and went live) in the year 1998. To celebrate its origins, developers can show you precisely what the primitive search engine once looked like; type “Google in 1998” and remember those halcyon data of the early internet

BONUS TIP FOR EXTRA KNOW-HOW: Security how-to: Remove saved credit card info your browser

You might find when you pay for something online, your web browser offers to save your credit card information so you can pay faster next time. That can be convenient but also dangerous if other people ever get to your computer.

A smart reader recently noticed that and asked me an excellent question: How can you remove saved credit card information from your browser once it’s in there?

Tap or click for directions on how to do it for all the major browsers.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.



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University of Guelph pauses search for new president, names interim one – Guelph


The University of Guelph says it is suspending its search for a new president and vice-chancellor amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Instead, the board of governors have appointed current provost and vice-president Charlotte Yates as president on an interim basis for two years.


READ MORE:
University of Guelph cancels ‘face-to-face’ classes, events in response to COVID-19

Board chair Shauneen Bruder said universities and organizations worldwide are focused on addressing the COVID-19 pandemic and this is where their efforts and resources should be concentrated.

“COVID-19 is creating much uncertainty, both now and for the future,” Bruder said in a statement. “We expect that even once the crisis subsides, the implications will be long-lasting. At the same time, there are many other strategic imperatives the university must address to continue to move forward.”

Yates replaces outgoing president and vice-chancellor Franco Vaccarino, who announced last year that he was stepping down. His term will end on Aug. 1 and Yates will officially take over the following day.

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A search committee has been working since last fall and the university said it was at a critical stage of the process when it made the decision to pause the search.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

Bruder said Yates was chosen in part because of her effectiveness in a range of complex situations and circumstances.

“Her significant experience and extensive knowledge of the complexities and challenges facing the university will enable her to act immediately on priorities during this critical period,” Bruder said.


READ MORE:
McGill University students design 3D-printable masks for health-care workers

Yates has served as provost since 2015 and the university said since then she has built a strong leadership team that includes five new deans and other key academic leaders.

She previously served as dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences at McMaster University.

“I am deeply honoured by the trust the board has placed in me to lead the University of Guelph during this challenging time,” Yates said.

“I welcome this opportunity. The university has extraordinary, dedicated faculty, staff and students and exceptionally strong academic and administrative leaders. Working together, we will rise to meet the challenges before us while also enhancing our reputation for quality and excellence.”

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An announcement regarding an interim provost and vice-president to replace Yates will be forthcoming, the university said.


READ MORE:
Here’s why frequent handwashing is recommended in preventing spread of COVID-19

In response to the pandemic, the University of Guelph has cancelled all in-person classes for the remainder of the winter semester and more than 4,000 students living on residence have moved out.

Classes resumed on Monday in what the university called an “alternative delivery format.”

More information on its response to the pandemic can be found on the university’s website.










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New Zealand volcano: Search fails to find last two victims as death toll hits 16



A search has failed to locate the bodies of the last two victims of a volcano eruption in New Zealand that claimed the lives of at least 16 people.

It came as New Zealand police confirmed the 16th victim died on Saturday at Sydney’s Concord Hospital, one of several Australian hospitals where survivors suffering from severe burns were being treated.

It comes as the first five victims were officially named by police. 

On Sunday, two four-person teams landed on the volcanic White Island by helicopter to search a location thought to be where one of the remaining bodies might be. 

The teams were wearing heavy protective clothing due to the toxic air and gases present on the island as a result of the eruption.

Their breathing apparatus allowed them to search for only 75 minutes.

The searchers were unable to locate either body and returned to the mainland where they underwent decontamination. 

New Zealand Police national operations commander John Tims said the search will continue.

Members of a dive squad conduct a search during a recovery operation around White Island (NEW ZEALAND POLICE via REUTERS)

“We have always anticipated recovering all bodies from the island, and we remain deeply committed to that goal, to allow families some closure,” he said.

“We are now debriefing, reassessing and coming up with a new plan going forward.”

Mr Tims said the process of identifying victims and releasing bodies to their loved ones was ongoing in Auckland, New Zealand’s largest city.

“We will continue to release the names of those who have died as soon as we are able to,” he said.

Five victims have so far been named, four of whom are Australians.

The first to be named was Krystal Browitt, a veterinary nursing student from Melbourne, Australia, who turned 21 on November 29.

On Sunday, Zoe Hosking, 15, and her stepfather Gavin Dallow, 53, both from Adelaide, were confirmed as dead. Lisa Dallow, Zoe’s mother, is being treated for severe burns.

Anthony Langford, 51, of Sydney, has also been confirmed dead. He was travelling with his wife Kristine Langford and their children Jesse, 19, and Winona, 17.

Jesse survived the eruption and was identified in a New Zealand hospital on Tuesday evening. His mother and sister are still unaccounted for.

The fourth person identified on Sunday is New Zealand resident Tipene Maangi, 24.

Two British women were among those admitted to hospital in New Zealand after the volcano erupted.

All 13 Australians who suffered burns were transported to hospitals around Australia for treatment, at least eight of whom are reported to be in a critical condition.

Navy and police divers are expected to resume the search of waters around the island later on Sunday.

 

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100 Jewish graves were desecrated in France. A search for the websites that fueled the hate led to the US


But in early December, that is exactly what happened in the small village of Westhoffen in the Bas-Rhin region of Alsace, in eastern France. No one knows exactly when swastikas and anti-Semitic graffiti were spray-painted onto 107 tombstones in the village’s ancient Jewish cemetery — the 42nd anti-Semitic attack in the region in just 18 months.

French authorities are taking the matter extremely seriously. France’s Interior Minister Christophe Castaner visited Westhoffen the day after the swastikas were discovered and French President Emmanuel Macron paid his respects at the cemetery of Quatzenheim after it was desecrated earlier this year. And yet, no one has been caught.

A source close to the investigation told CNN that locals are believed to be responsible for the recent spree and that they may have been incited by global websites. Extra police resources have been allocated to the search for the culprits and several officers are working on the cases full-time. Part of the difficulty is that the villages are remote and very quiet. And according to the man in charge of the investigation in the Bas-Rhin, the culprits are not your average criminals.

“Normally,” says Colonel Francois Despres, “it is about following the money, but this is another type of criminal and people who are used to adopting a low profile both in society and when they commit acts. So that’s why it’s a question of patience and we are patient and that patience will pay.”

For now, 42 attacks — on graveyards, town halls, schools and cultural centers — remain unpunished and the threat of more remains. While the hunt for the culprits continued on the ground, CNN began to investigate who might be influencing them from afar. What we found was a trail that led us from Alsace, through the Bahamas and Panama, and on to the United States.

People look at tombs at Westhoffen cemetery near Strasbourg after they were desecrated.

Searching the internet, CNN found two French-language websites posting celebratory articles and photographs about the attacks in Alsace. “White Europe” and “Participatory democracy,” are both domiciled outside of France — in the Bahamas and Panama — and therefore beyond the reach of France’s anti-hate speech laws. Both are openly anti-Semitic, with “White Europe” hailing the work of “the proud people of Alsace who are leading the way.”

In response to CNN’s questions, “White Europe” said that although they didn’t know who was responsible, they did support such actions. “Participative democracy” told us that whilst they did not condone the crimes, they believed that the attacks were staged as part of a Jewish conspiracy. Both sites promote the theories of the late American white supremacist David Lane, whose 14-word slogan — “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children” — is a rallying cry for parts of the extreme right. A reference to it was made in the attack at Westhoffen: one of the tombs had been graffitied with the number 14.

Both sites use the American internet infrastructure company Cloudflare — which not only allows websites to get online but helps them stay there, by shielding them from cyberattacks. In the wake of the El Paso mass shooting this summer, Cloudflare discontinued its service to 8chan after a user believed to be the killer was found to have posted a rant on it. Cloudflare also said it stopped its service to the US neo-Nazi blog Daily Stormer in 2017. Not because any laws obliged it to but because it chose to following the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.
Cloudflare said it stopped its service to the US neo-Nazi blog Daily Stormer in 2017 after Charlottesville.

CNN asked the company why it was not doing the same against hate speech that happens to be in French, and much of which is illegal in France, but received no reply.

We also found that posts from the French sites stayed up for a while on Facebook before they were taken down, while Facebook says posts from Daily Stormer are blocked from being shared. After CNN reached out to ask about Facebook’s policy, the company began blocking the French sites too. Twitter, for its part, allows the sharing of posts from both the French sites and Daily Stormer. In response to CNN’s questions, the company said it will start blocking certain content in the future. Twitter also said that they take action on content that violates their policies, including hateful conduct.

The trouble is that for the time being, with hate speech on the internet so far beyond the reach of national laws, the only restrictions that apply to it are decided by private companies and on a case-by-case basis. Guillaume Debré says it is time that this global problem received a global solution. “Without it,” he says, “you’re going to have more Westhoffens, more Quatzenheims and others and not just in France but in New Zealand and in America.”

It is an issue on which France is seeking to lead the way in the wake of the Christchurch attack, live-streamed on the internet. Soon after, the French government announced a bill, now working its way through the parliament, that seeks to force social media platforms to be responsible for the content they distribute. Companies like Facebook would have 24 hours to take hate speech down after users flagged it or face a hefty fine.

In an exclusive interview with France’s Interior Minister, we asked whether the United States, where so many of the internet giants are based, was doing enough. “No. And my answer is clear,” said Castaner, “because there is a clear difference of culture.”

“It is not about opposing French or European culture to American culture, but clearly on these subjects there is a belief in the freedom to say anything and everything. I believe that there is no freedom when it is us and our fundamental values that are being attacked.”

French Interior Minister Christophe Castaner, center, visits the Jewish cemetery at Westhoffen after the attack this month.
In the meantime, the French government says it is doing what it can. After visiting Westhoffen, Castaner announced a national taskforce dedicated to investigating and fighting hate crimes. This in a country that has Europe’s largest Jewish population — 550,000 people — and where in 2018 the number of anti-Semitic attacks, which includes both threats and assaults, rose by about 75%, according to the latest interior ministry figures.

One question is why these attacks have happened in this particular area of France. Positioned on France’s border with Germany and Switzerland, Alsace has changed hands several times over the centuries. A history reflected in its local dialect — far closer to German than to French — and in its culture. It is also a region that has one of the oldest Jewish populations in Europe, first documented in the 12th century.

Long confined to the villages by edicts that banned them from the cities, the Jewish community was an important part of rural life in the Bas-Rhin region. Relations between the communities were not always calm — there were regular pogroms and sectarian tensions between local Protestants and Catholic populations — but for 1,000 years they lived side by side. By the 20th century though, local Jews were migrating to Strasbourg, a rural exodus hastened by World War II, and leaving behind only their cemeteries. In all, there are just 45 cemeteries of them in the Bas-Rhin.

Inside one of the largest — and heavily guarded — synagogues in Europe, the chief rabbi of Strasbourg, Harold Weill, told us that it was because Alsace had such a vibrant and well-integrated Jewish population that those on the extreme fringes chose to target it, warning that “hatred that begins with the Jews, never ends with the Jews.”

Yoav Rossano, is on the frontline of that hatred. In his role as the head of Jewish heritage in the Bas-Rhin he is often the first on the scene of attacks and the first to be confronted by the symbols of hate.

“It is awaking the history,” he says of the recent spate of attacks. “Part of the family line died in Auschwitz so to see here in my region, you feel a big responsibility.”

That responsibility both protects the history of the Jewish population here and ensures its future.

But it is a lonely and difficult battle with ancient regional tensions now being fed by an international white supremacy movement facilitated by technology.

Global hate is now fanning local flames and that may be harder for Rossano to stop.



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Australian police find body of man in search for missing British backpacker



Australian police have found a body they believe to be that of Aslan King, a British backpacker who went missing from a campsite at the weekend.

The body has not yet been formally identified, but local authorities believe it is that of King, 25, who has been missing in the state of Victoria since Saturday.

King, an illustrator from Brighton, was last seen at a camping ground in Princetown, on the Great Ocean Road, at about 2am on Saturday. His disappearance prompted an intensive search.

King had been camping with friends near the Twelve Apostles, about three hours southwest of Melbourne, when he suffering a suspected seizure and hit his head, before suddenly running into bushland.

Fearing King – who had been on holiday in Australia – had become disorientated and lost in the bush, police deployed a helicopter, horses, motorcycle riders, specialist rescue teams and volunteers to find him.

“The body was located about 10:15 am this morning in a creek just over a kilometre from the camping ground where Aslan was last seen,” police said.





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With coach Khari Jones signed, Als turn their attention to GM search


Now that Khari Jones is returning as the Alouettes’ head coach — the two sides reached agreement on a three-year deal during Grey Cup week in Calgary, the Montreal Gazette has learned — and until the team’s ownership situation is settled, the next order of business will be hiring a general manager.

It would be easy for the Als to hire someone with experience. Should the Canadian Football League team go that route, the three leading candidates could be Eric Tillman, Brendan Taman and Danny Maciocia.

Tillman has experience with British Columbia, Toronto, the Ottawa Renegades, Saskatchewan, Edmonton and, most recently, Hamilton. He has won three Grey Cups and, at the very least, deserves to be interviewed by president Patrick Boivin.

Taman, currently out of football, was the GM at both Winnipeg and Saskatchewan, while Maciocia is a former Edmonton GM and head coach. Now the coach at Université de Montréal, Maciocia has led the Carabins to three Vanier Cup appearances, and one title, since 2014. The Carabins lost Saturday’s championship game to the University of Calgary.


Montreal Alouettes head coach Khari Jones smiles during practice in Montreal on Nov. 8, 2019.

John Mahoney /

Montreal Gazette

But it’s also possible Boivin and the organization will think outside the box and hire someone with vast CFL experience, but who has never been a GM.

It shouldn’t be forgotten Boivin has enlisted the services of Wally Buono, the former B.C. GM and head coach, in an advisory role. Buono will probably recommend former colleagues Neil McEvoy and/or Geroy Simon — perhaps a combination of the two — for the job.

Those two seemingly would work well with Jones — a key component in this scenario, because the Als have hired a coach before the GM — who came to Montreal after being the Lions’ offensive coordinator.

McEvoy, the Lions’ director of football operations, has held that position five years, but has been with the organization for 24. He handles many of the daily football operations activities, including player contracts, training camp and travel logistics and scouting preparation. He also plays a key role in the evaluation of Canadian talent for the CFL draft.

Simon, the former standout receiver, is the Lions’ director of Canadian scouting and draft coordinator. He has spent five seasons in football operations and, in 2018, said he was ready to become a GM.

Two members of the Grey Cup champion Winnipeg Blue Bombers also deserve consideration.

Danny McManus is the Bombers’ assistant GM and director of U.S. scouting. A former CFL quarterback for 17 seasons, McManus has been with Winnipeg since December 2013.

He scours the U.S. for talent while working closely with GM Kyle Walters in helping shape the roster and the team’s negotiation list. McManus also organizes the team’s free-agent tryout camps held throughout the U.S. during the winter.

Before joining the Bombers, McManus worked as a scout with Hamilton from 2009-13. He originally was hired as a regional scout before becoming the Tiger-Cats’ head U.S. scout. He was an offensive assistant coach with the team in 2008.

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Ted Goveia also serves as an assistant GM with Winnipeg along with being the team’s director of player personnel. He has been with the Bombers for six years. He held the same role with Toronto between 2010-13.

Ottawa assistant GM Jeremy Snyder and Jean-Marc Edmé, the Redblacks’ director of player personnel, both spent time with the Als.

Snyder joined the Redblacks in March 2013 as the director of football administration along with serving as a pro and college scout. He was promoted to assistant GM in May 2017.

He began his CFL career with the Als in 2010, working under former GM Jim Popp as a scouting assistant. He became a full-time employee the following season, assuming many key roles in the team’s scouting department. Snyder also has NFL experience with the Chicago Bears and Philadelphia Eagles.

Edmé, meanwhile, spent eight years with the Als under Popp, where his duties included scouting university and pro players. He also served as a defensive assistant under former head coach Marc Trestman.

Edmé has spent 13 seasons in the CFL, including the last four with Ottawa. He joined the Redblacks in January 2016 as the player personnel coordinator before being promoted to the director of player personnel. He’s also bilingual.

The Als’ GM position, however, won’t be for everyone. Normally, the manager is hired first and his responsibility is to find a coach with whom he can work. Because the Als have gone about this unconventionally, any potential GM will want to know how the power will be divided and who will answer to whom. If the GM doesn’t have full autonomy, that could eliminate many potential candidates.

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