Posted on

Man Utd ‘have shirt number ready’ if they seal Jadon Sancho transfer


Manchester United reportedly have a shirt number ready for Jadon Sancho if the Borussia Dortmund winger signs for them this summer.

United are confident they can lure Sancho to Old Trafford this summer – despite the coronavirus pandemic having halted negotiations with the 20-year-old.

There is a feeling at United that if Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side secure Champions League football, they will beat the likes of Chelsea, Liverpool, Manchester City and PSG to Sancho’s signature.

And in a bid to convince him star he can have a great future with United, club chiefs are ready to offer him the iconic number seven shirt, according to the Evening Standard.

Sancho would be following in the footsteps of United legends George Best, Eric Cantona, David Beckham and Cristiano Ronaldo by wearing seven.

Jadon Sancho is Manchester United’s top target this summer

The current incumbent, Alexis Sanchez, has been less successful than his predecessors in the shirt and was shipped out to Inter Milan on loan last summer.

United hope to sell the Chilean this summer, but if they fail to do so they could strip him of the seven shirt anyway and hand it to Sancho, according to Metro.

Sancho has been in superb form again this season, with the player scoring 17 goals and creating 17 assists in all competitions for the Bundesliga side.

It is thought Dortmund would be willing to let him go if they receive an offer they can’t refuse, and they value the 20-year-old at around £130m.

United are set to offer Sancho the iconic number seven shirt worn by Cristiano Ronaldo

Read More

Mirror Football’s Top Stories

United and PSG could therefore be set for a bidding war for Sancho, who is one of the most highly-sought after young players in the world.

Liverpool have also been linked with a swoop for Sancho in recent months, but it is understood Jurgen Klopp is prioritising a move for RB Leipzig star Timo Werner.





Source link

Posted on

Defense Secretary Says Trump Ordered Him To Let Eddie Gallagher Retire As Navy SEAL : NPR


U.S. Secretary for Defense Mark Esper, pictured in October, told reporters at the Pentagon on Monday that President Trump ordered him to ensure Eddie Gallagher retained his Trident pin.

Virginia Mayo/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Virginia Mayo/AP

U.S. Secretary for Defense Mark Esper, pictured in October, told reporters at the Pentagon on Monday that President Trump ordered him to ensure Eddie Gallagher retained his Trident pin.

Virginia Mayo/AP

President Trump has repeatedly intervened on behalf of the Navy SEAL recently convicted of misconduct. And Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Trump did it again over the weekend, directly ordering him to allow Chief Petty Officer Eddie Gallagher to retire as a SEAL.

“I spoke with the President on Sunday. He gave me the order that Eddie Gallagher will retain his Trident pin,” Esper told reporters Monday at the Pentagon, referring to the insignia designating Gallagher as a member of the elite commando force.

The order from the commander in chief effectively put an end to proceedings by a Trident Review Board called by the commander of Navy Special Warfare, Rear Adm. Collin Green. The panel was charged with deciding whether Gallagher and three of his supervising officers were fit for duty. In Gallagher’s case, the board was set to convene next week.

On Monday, Esper also reiterated his reasons for asking Navy Secretary Richard Spencer to tender his resignation on Sunday. He accused Spencer of circumventing the appropriate channels, including Esper himself, to engage in direct negotiations with the White House to allow Gallagher to remain a SEAL. Meanwhile, Spencer was saying publicly that the Trident Review Board process should be allowed to play out.

“This proposal was completely contrary to what we agreed to, and contrary to Secretary Spencer’s public position,” Esper said, adding that he was “completely caught off-guard by this information, and realized that it had undermined everything we had been discussing with the president.”

Esper tried to undo the perception that Spencer’s dismissal was tied to the specifics of Gallagher’s case, saying instead that it was over the chain of command.

The standoff between the commander in chief and the Navy’s top brass began even before Gallagher’s court-martial trial over the summer. Gallagher, who served multiple tours in Iraq, was accused of a slew of crimes, including the murder of a wounded Islamic State prisoner. In the end, he was acquitted of all but one charge, posing with a dead detainee. Part of his sentence included a demotion to a lower rank of petty officer first class.

Trump subsequently overturned that decision, commanding the Navy to promote Gallagher back to chief petty officer.

Rear Adm. Green’s decision to initiate a review of Gallagher’s fitness as a SEAL was seen as a rebuke of the president’s order.

In his resignation letter, Spencer suggested that his dismissal was indeed connected to Gallagher’s review rather than any communication back-channels.

“Unfortunately it has become apparent that in this respect, I no longer share the same understanding with the Commander in Chief who appointed me, in regards to the key principle of good order and discipline,” Spencer wrote. “I cannot in good conscience obey an order that I believe violates the sacred oath I took in the presence of my family, my flag and my faith to support and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

On Sunday, Trump also linked Spencer’s ouster to Gallagher. “I was not pleased with the way that Navy Seal Eddie Gallagher’s trial was handled by the Navy. He was treated very badly but, despite this, was completely exonerated on all major charges. I then restored Eddie’s rank,” the president tweeted.

Then he introduced another reason for pushing Spencer out: “Large cost overruns from past administration’s…..contracting procedures were not addressed to my satisfaction.”

The president added that he would nominate Kenneth Braithwaite as the next Navy secretary. “A man of great achievement and success, I know Ken will do an outstanding job!” Trump said.

Gallagher’s attorney, Timothy Parlatore, told the Navy Times that neither he nor his client foresaw such fallout. “With this personnel change, this institution will improve and no one will go through the ordeal Eddie went through. At the end of the day, the most important duty any of us have is protecting America,” Parlatore said.

“This case is completely bananas,” he added.

Gallagher said he is “overjoyed” that the president stepped in on his behalf once again. In an interview on Fox & Friends that aired Sunday morning, Gallagher name-checked Green and Spencer.

“This is all about ego and retaliation. This has nothing to do with good order and discipline. They could have taken my Trident at any time they wanted. Now they’re trying to take it after the president restored my rank,” Gallagher said.

It is unclear where the events of the last few days leave the Trident Review Board proceedings for Gallagher’s three supervising officers: Lt. Jacob Portier, Lt. Cmdr. Robert Breisch and Lt. Thomas MacNeil.





Source link

Posted on

Navy Secretary Richard Spencer fired in dispute over discipline of SEAL


Navy Secretary Richard Spencer was fired Sunday by Defense Secretary Mark Esper, who ordered that a Navy SEAL who was acquitted of murder be allowed to remain in the elite commando corps, the Defense Department said.

Esper asked for Spencer’s resignation after President Donald Trump tweeted on Thursday that Chief Petty Officer Eddie Gallagher would retain the gold Trident insignia signifying his status as a member of the Sea, Air, and Land Teams, or SEALs. Spencer told reporters on Friday that he believed the review process over Gallagher’s status should go forward.

In a letter to Trump, Spencer said he acknowledged his “termination,” saying the president deserved a Navy secretary “who is aligned with his vision.”

“Unfortunately, it has become apparent that in this respect, I no longer share the same understanding with the Commander in Chief who appointed me,” Spencer wrote.

“In regards to the key principle of good order and discipline, I cannot in good conscience obey an order that I believe violates the sacred oath I took in the presence of my family, my flag and my faith to support and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

Shortly thereafter, Trump tweeted that he was displeased not only by the way that “Gallagher’s trial was handled by the Navy” but also because “large cost overruns from [the] past administration’s contracting procedures were not addressed to my satisfaction.”

Let our news meet your inbox. The news and stories that matters, delivered weekday mornings.

“Therefore, Secretary of the Navy Richard Spencer’s services have been terminated by Secretary of Defense Mark Esper,” he wrote. He said he would nominate retired Adm. Kenneth Braithwaite, the U.S. ambassador to Norway, to succeed Spencer.

The Navy sought to eject Gallagher and four other sailors from the SEALs after Trump intervened to direct that Gallagher not be demoted following his conviction of having posed for a picture with the corpse of a teenage fighter for the Islamic State militant group.

Esper directed that Gallagher retain his Trident pin, the Defense Department said in a statement. Undersecretary Thomas Modly becomes acting Navy secretary pending Braithwaite’s confirmation hearings.

The dispute flared into the open last week after NBC News and other organizations reported that the Navy was convening a review board to consider whether Gallagher should remain in the SEALs after he was convicted of posing with the ISIS fighter’s corpse but acquitted of having killed the young man.

Navy Chief Petty Officer Eddie Gallagher and his wife, Andrea Gallagher, walk into military court in San Diego on June 24, 2019.Sandy Huffaker / Getty Images – file

Trump tweeted on Thursday that “the Navy will NOT be taking away Warfighter and Navy Seal Eddie Gallagher’s Trident Pin,” saying the case was “handled very badly from the beginning.” Earlier, the president had overturned the Navy’s decision to demote Gallagher, which would have severely affected his retirement pay.

In response, Spencer told reporters on Friday that he believed Gallagher’s review process should go forward. Multiple sources told NBC News that Spencer had privately told the White House that a tweet wasn’t an official order and that if Trump was ordering the Navy to end the review board proceedings, he needed to do so in writing.

The Defense Department said Sunday that Esper had learned that — contrary to what he was saying in public — Spencer privately proposed to the White House both that Gallagher’s rank be restored and that he be allowed to retire as a SEAL. It said Esper was never informed of the private proposal.

The Defense Department said Esper had lost “trust and confidence” in Spencer “regarding his lack of candor over conversations with the White House.”

Download the NBC News app for breaking news

In an interview on Fox News Channel’s “Fox & Friends” on Sunday, Gallagher accused the Navy of seeking to strip the SEAL designation as retribution for Trump’s intervention on his behalf.

“This is all about retaliation. They could have taken my Trident at any time they wanted,” he said. “Now they’re trying to take it after the president restored my rank.”

Referring to Rear Adm. Collin P. Green, who as commander of Naval Special Warfare Command is in charge of the SEALs, Gallagher alleged: “The admiral is showing insubordination.”

A military jury acquitted Gallagher of murder and war crimes charges in July but convicted him of having posed with the corpse of the ISIS captive. He was ordered dropped in rank from chief to petty officer first class.

Trump reversed the order this month, directing Gallagher’s restoration as chief petty officer.

Spencer, who became Navy secretary in August 2017, was the acting defense secretary for about a week in July as Esper underwent confirmation hearings in the Senate.





Source link

Posted on

U.S. defense secretary fires Navy chief over handling of SEAL saga


WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper fired the Navy’s top civilian after losing confidence in him over his handling of the high-profile case of a Navy SEAL convicted of battlefield misconduct in Iraq, the Pentagon said on Sunday.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper delivers remarks before ringing the closing NASDAQ bell for Veterans Day in New York, New York, November 11, 2019. DoD/Lisa Ferdinando/Handout via REUTERS

Esper also determined that the sailor in question, Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, should be allowed to retain his Trident pin designating him as a SEAL – effectively ending the Navy’s efforts to carry out a peer review that could have led to his ouster from the elite force.

President Donald Trump had publicly opposed taking away Gallagher’s Trident pin. Trump had already intervened in Gallagher’s case earlier this month, using his authority to restore the decorated officer’s rank and pay and allow him to retire later this year on a full pension.

Navy Secretary Richard Spencer made headlines last week for suggesting a possible split with Trump by saying Gallagher should face a peer review board.

But Pentagon spokesman Jonathan Hoffman said Spencer also had a private line of communications with the White House.

“Secretary Spencer had previously and privately proposed to the White House – contrary to Spencer’s public position – to restore Gallagher’s rank and allow him to retire with his Trident pin,” Hoffman said.

Spencer never informed Esper of his private proposal, Hoffman said.

Esper decided to ask for Spencer’s resignation after “losing trust and confidence in him regarding his lack of candor over conversations with the White House,” Hoffman said.

Gallagher, 40, was demoted in rank and pay grade after being convicted by a military jury in July of illegally posing for pictures with the corpse of an Islamic State fighter.

On Nov. 15, the White House said in a statement that Trump had restored Gallagher’s rank and had pardoned two Army officers accused of war crimes in Afghanistan. Critics had said such actions would undermine military justice and send a message that battlefield atrocities will be tolerated.

In an appearance on Fox News Channel on Sunday, Gallagher indicated that he hoped to retire next Saturday, “without the board” convening to decide whether he could continue to be a SEAL, considered among the most elite of U.S. fighting forces.

Reporting by Phil Stewart, Patricia Zengerle and Howard Schneider; Editing by Sonya Hepinstall and Peter Cooney

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.



Source link