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Brexit news: EU and UK have ‘precious time’ to find secure deal as MEP issues warning | Politics | News


Christophe Hansen, a member of the European Parliament’s Brexit committee, claimed both sides face a race against the clock to conclude any agreement ahead of the looming ratification deadline. Sources have hinted a deal could emerge by mid-November, but the Luxembourger insisted MEPs would need to see the “substance” of the future relationship pact as early as next week in order to complete the formalities. Speaking to Express.co.uk, Mr Hansen conceded talks are already set to overrun the original deadline set to give the EU Parliament enough time to rubber-stamp any agreement.

He said: “We would have wanted this effort to have already started earlier on because we have precious little time.

“We’ve lost precious time and it’s now the very last phase of the negotiations, if we don’t hear much that’s not very helpful – we’re really waiting for the final substance, and the microphone on that is silent.”

Before any Brexit deal can enter into force it must be scrutinised by two parliamentary committees in Brussels and then given the green light at a plenary session in December.

Mr Hansen revealed the EU Parliament had already agreed to a “fast-tracked procedure” to give negotiators extra time to find agreements on the key sticking points of access to Britain’s coastal waters and controls over state subsidies for businesses.

Michel Barnier and David Frost

Michel Barnier and Lord Frost are said to be edging closer to a Brexit deal (Image: GETTY•PA)

David Frost

Lord Frost is the UK’s chief Brexit negotiator (Image: GETTY)

He said: “We need six weeks to two months to do our work properly. We are under time pressure, this will already break a fast-tracked procedure and is the fastest we can do. 

“We need concrete results in the first week of November.”

Both sides have been locked in intensive wrangling over the Brexit deal after the EU agreed to finally begin work on a joint legal text and put pen to paper on the agreement after months of stalling.

The talks will shift to Brussels on Thursday for one final push before a potential political intervention from Boris Johnson and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen.

Michel Barnier

Michel Barnier in London (Image: GETTY)

Mr Hansen insisted the EU and UK can overcome their differences over common standards, especially for state aid, in order to clinch a deal.

He said: “The problem is not the level-playing field or concerns over state aid, this is a question of trust.

“When we look at the UK, it doesn’t have a very strong track record of giving too much state aid, so the danger is not as imminent as one might say.

“We know what the UK state aid regime will be, it’s finding the necessary supervision for this and the possibility to address concerns.”

MUST READ: Brexit fury: Boris Johnson blasted for ‘giving up’ in EU talks

Christophe Hansen

MEP Christophe Hansen is a member of the EU Parliament’s Brexit committee (Image: EbS)

Fisheries remains one of the toughest issues to solve in the coming days, with the subject still shown as a “red light” on the EU’s traffic light system for progress.

A number of European governments, including France and Belgium, are still holding out for the same level of access to Britain’s coastal waters after Brexit.

But Michel Barnier, the EU’s Brexit chief, believes possible compromises have emerged in order to secure concessions from Britain.

The Frenchman is working on a trade-off between the UK’s access to the EU’s energy markets and the bloc’s access to British fishing grounds, according to Mr Hansen.

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Mr Hansen said: “Those are compromises we could make, the UK or EU has strengths and weaknesses, that’s why we want to discuss everything together.”

In a final warning, the politician insisted the EU Parliament could still veto any trade agreement at the last minute if Downing Street refuses to remove controversial clauses from its Internal Market Bill.

The legislation, which gives ministers the power to tear up parts of last year’s withdrawal agreement, infuriated Brussels.

Mr Hansen said: “The withdrawal agreement must be respected to the very last letter. It’s not a threat, just a reality that we would not consent to a deal at any cost.”





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Boris Johnson used to be the Teflon man of British politics, brushing off scandals, gaffes and mistakes. Not any more


Now Johnson’s plans appear ruined. He’d wanted to use his personal enthusiasm for Brexit to instil a fresh sense of optimism that the UK’s future was brighter outside the European Union. Free from the Brussels bureaucracy, Johnson’s government vowed to address the UK’s socio-economic imbalance that in some sense led to Brexit by “leveling up” deprived areas. He would also seek to strengthen the bond between the four nations of the UK, which had been stretched to near-breaking point amid the bitterness following the 2016 referendum. In short, the man who led the campaign that caused so much division was on a charm offensive to heal the country.

However, 10 months on, his government is short on resources and losing good will. Johnson’s opponents point to numerous errors made early in the pandemic over testing and confusing messaging over lockdowns, the highest death count in Europe and worst recession of any major economy as evidence of his failures. Worse, members of his own party fear that his lack of attention to detail and instinct for combative politics is causing a shift in the PM’s public perception: From affable optimist to incompetent bully who is hopelessly out of his depth. And they worry what long-term damage this might do both to Johnson’s personal mission and the brand of the Conservative party writ large.

One former Conservative cabinet minister and colleague of Johnson, who declined to be named, agreed with this analysis. “To deal with a crisis like this, you need public confidence and you need different bits of the state working together as effectively as possible,” the politician said. “Instead, they have managed to enrage the leadership in Scotland and Wales while picking largely pointless fights with mayors of major cities where Conservatives historically don’t do well. It’s a very strange way of going about uniting the country.”

Over the past week, Johnson has been in a protracted and public spat with the Labour Mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham. Johnson wanted the city to enter the UK’s highest tier of Covid restrictions. Burnham didn’t want this to happen without more financial support from the central government. The whole thing ended in a complete mess, as Johnson’s government didn’t make clear after talks collapsed that the money deemed insufficient by Burnham was still on the table. This led to a televised press conference in which Burnham supposedly found out live on air that the government had withdrawn their offer of £60 million ($78 million) for the city, instead only offering £22 million.

The government claims the whole thing was a set up by Burnham and in fact the minister responsible had talked with him before the press conference.

A government minister told CNN that there is “zero evidence that the PM picked a fight with Burnham,” adding that a central government “naturally has to balance economic and public health issues while local politicians have a much narrower focus,” implying Burnham was playing politics with Johnson.

However, worryingly for Johnson, his personal approval ratings and trust in his government have plummeted sufficiently since the crisis that the truth doesn’t entirely matter.

“When you look at Boris’s personal brand you see dramatic drop-offs in people who think he is likeable and trustworthy since the start of the pandemic. He now lags behind Keir Starmer (leader of the opposition Labour party) on almost all of those metrics,” says Chris Curtis, Political Research Manager at pollster YouGov.

This dip in trust is particularly toxic for Johnson when you combine it with the reputation Conservatives have in parts of the country that historically vote Labour and Johnson was able to pick up seats in last December’s election — the so-called Red Wall.

This reputation was not helped when Johnson found himself in round two of a fight with popular Manchester United footballer Marcus Rashford over providing meals for the poorest children during the Christmas holidays this year. On Wednesday night, Johnson directed his party to vote against the proposal.

“People will remember in six or 12 months that the government didn’t seem to care if children went hungry over Christmas during an economic crisis. It costs relatively little to fund compared to other government spending this year,” says Lauren McEvatt, former special adviser to a previous Conservative administration. “It feeds into a narrative which still exists that Conservatives ultimately don’t care as much about poor people.”

What’s perplexed many observers over the Rashford affair is that Johnson had to U-turn earlier this year on exactly the same matter for summer holidays. “This government is like that GIF where Sideshow Bob keeps stepping on the same rakes and whacking himself in the face,” says Rob Ford, professor of politics at the University of Manchester.

All of which only goes to reopen the question of government competence. “From the start, this government set out to hyper-centralize everything from a small team in Downing Street in order to have a tight grip on the Johnson project,” says a senior Conservative lawmaker. “That means a small group of people are making decisions in areas they might not be experts. That’s hard enough at the best of times, but during a crisis which affects the whole country and is constantly changing, it’s virtually impossible.”

The lawmaker goes on to explain that he thinks they “rely too much on focus groups” in order to appeal to public opinion. “The trouble is, focus groups don’t have much foresight. Something might be very popular one day but six months down the line look like a massive mistake. Normal practice in government is to find the right policy and sell it to the public, not the other way around.”

Numerous current and former Downing Street insiders told CNN that while it was true this government did run a lot of focus groups and deemed them to be very important, opinion was divided on their precise influence over policy making. Some said that decisions were made on the basis of focus groups; some said they helped shape how the government would sell policy to the public; some claimed it had led to major policy U-turns, including over Rashford’s summer campaign. A government official denied this claim.

Boris Johnson visits the headquarters of the London Ambulance Service NHS Trust  on July 13, 2020 in London.

Whatever the truth, it is hard to deny that Johnson’s credibility has taken a significant hit this year. Many point to a scandal surrounding his most senior adviser, Dominic Cummings, as the worst moment of the year. Cummings, having displayed symptoms for Covid, decided to drive hundreds of miles from his home in London when government advice clearly stated that he should self-isolate. Cummings claimed that he did so to provide childcare for his young son.

“They could have killed that story in 48 hours if they said he was desperately worried about his baby and now realizes it was wrong,” says the former cabinet minister. Instead, Cummings gave a bizarre press conference where he defended not only his initial trip, but a further outing in his car which he claimed to merely be testing his eyesight. “The refusal to show any kind of contrition led to a big change of mood. That episode symbolizes what has been wrong about the approach,” the former minister adds.

Whether that’s fair or not, it’s certainly possible to argue the case that the Cummings scandal had three key ingredients: Cock-up; lack of apology; aggressive response. It is also possible to superimpose this playbook onto both the responses to Burnham and Rashford. In the case of the latter, Johnson was not helped by members of his own party implying that some poor parents are feckless and not interested in feeding their children and that children have always gone hungry anyway.
Marcus Rashford clashes with lawmakers as UK parliament votes against free school meals proposal

All of this leaves Johnson vulnerable to those who want to paint him as a mean-spirited bully running a shambolic government. “Fairly or unfairly, it does play to the stereotype of Conservatives as not interested in the poor and not interested in the north. This, unfortunately, does really damage his agenda for leveling up, cementing the red wall and defending the union,” says the former minister.

It’s worth pointing out that as things stand, Johnson’s party is still ahead in the polls. A government minister puts this down to the fact that despite all the headlines, Johnson’s real actions present an alternative narrative that voters understand. “If you move away from Covid, all the big announcements we have made are focused on investments in skills, and we didn’t go for austerity 2.0 despite massive pressure. All of these things suggest that leveling up is still the PM’s top priority,” the minister said.

However, despite those polls, Johnson only won his majority last December and that lead has been slipping. And as the crisis continues, many of his previous supporters are increasingly skeptical that Boris Johnson was ever really the man to unite a country divided by political chaos for which he was largely responsible.



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Joe Biden criticises Donald Trump for renewed Fauci attack over Covid – US politics live | US news


CNN Poll of Polls averages across 10 key battleground states suggest tight races heading into the final two weeks of the campaign in seven states and former Vice President Joe Biden ahead in the averages of the other three, all of which President Donald Trump won in 2016.

In Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin, the averages suggest Biden holds the support of a majority of voters and a sizable advantage over Trump.

The Pennsylvania average shows Biden’s largest lead. The Democratic nominee averages 52% support to Trump’s 43% in polling conducted between September 20 and October 5. In both Wisconsin and Michigan, the averages show Biden with 51% support to 43% for Trump. Trump’s victory in each of these states in 2016 came via a margin of less than a percentage point. Except for 2016, all three states broke for the Democratic candidate in each presidential election since 1992.

In 2016, Trump carried all 10 states where CNN Poll of Polls averages are being released Tuesday: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas and Wisconsin. He is numerically ahead of Biden in the averages of current polling in just one of these states, Texas, where his support averages 49% to Biden’s 45%.



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Sturgeon blasted for ‘lack of foresight’ as coronavirus measures cause chaos for hotels | Politics | News


In a letter to the Scottish First Minister, 100 hotels said a ban on serving alcohol to guests in public areas could lead to cancellations. Under current rules announced last week, hotels can serve alcohol to guests in their rooms through room service.

The letter, started by Jill Chalmers, managing director of Glenapp Castle in South Ayrshire, said: “Not being able to sell alcohol in public areas to hotel residents in Scotland negatively impacts their stay and future guests are already starting to cancel their bookings.

“This measure in particular is threatening the small thread of revenue – a lifeline for many – which still exists for hotel businesses in Scotland at this difficult time.

“We urge you to reconsider this and allow hotel guests, staying a minimum of one night, to consume alcohol in all settings, not simply room service alone.

“In addition, we believe that we should be able to serve non-residents until 6pm, as a café is allowed to do.

“If there is no change, we have no doubt that we will suffer deeper losses.

“We are talking about trying to survive, not about profitability.

“Without this small change in your policy, there will be thousands more job losses in the coming month.”

Scotland’s leading hotels including One Devonshire Gardens in Glasgow, The Fairmont in St Andrews, the Marcliffe in Aberdeen and the Prestonfield in Edinburgh are all signatories.

READ MORE: House of Lords shamed: Peer breaks cover to admit he’s embarrassed

As of this week, pubs, bars, restaurants and cafes outside central Scotland will only be allowed to operate indoors between 6am and 6pm and not serve alcohol, though drinks can be served until 10pm in outdoor areas.

But all pubs and licensed restaurants in five areas – Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Lanarkshire, Ayrshire and Arran, Lothian, and Forth Valley – will be forced to close for all but takeaway service for 16 days from 6pm on Friday.

However, Nicola Sturgeon revealed on Thursday that cafes can be exempt from the central belt shut down during the day if they do not sell alcohol, triggering confusion about how a cafe is defined.

Dr Liz Cameron, Scottish Chamber of Commerce chief executive, said: “These measures will sound the death knell for businesses across the hospitality sector, especially pubs and bars. Restaurants and hotels, whilst remaining open, will also be constrained on what they can provide and this will place a large dent in their already reduced income.

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“Hospitality businesses in the central belt face collapse if these current restrictions are extended beyond the initial two week period.

“We understand that tackling the spread of COVID-19 must be a top priority for government, but return to trading is essential to prevent the economy unravelling.”

Jackie Baillie MSP, deputy leader of Scottish Labour, added: “It does seem obvious that the First Minister did not take businesses and workers into account when drawing up these latest restrictions.

“We cannot have businesses, the workers they employ, and the public suffering due to the Scottish Government’s lack of foresight.”

In response, a Scottish Government spokesperson, said: “We know that protecting lives and jobs is a difficult balance and we do not underestimate the challenge that these new measures present for businesses – particularly those in the hospitality sector.

“That is why we have committed £40million to our new COVID-19 Restrictions Fund to help affected businesses and protect jobs.”





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Boris Johnson news: Steve Baker threatens Tory rebellion over PM’s ‘Draconian’ COVID power | Politics | News


He said: “100 Acts of Parliament have been used to put in place about 242 statutory instruments, and there have been about 200 changes.

“When you’ve got a body of law that large, changing that fast, I doubt really anyone understands what that law is.

“This is not a free environment for a free people.

“How do people think that liberty dies? It dies like this with Government exercising Draconian powers without parliamentary scrutiny in advance.”

READ MORE: SNP power to ‘distort’ post-Brexit UK trade thwarted by Boris plan

Mr Baker continued: “How do people think that liberty dies? It dies like this with Government exercising Draconian powers without parliamentary scrutiny in advance.

“It’s extremely serious, I don’t think I look like a hysterical person to you.

“Rishi Sunak brought up this issue that we need to learn to live without fear. At the moment, the public are being deliberately told that they should be afraid.

“The Government has been frightening people into compliance and it hasn’t been working.”

More to follow…





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PMQs: Boris Johnson faces Jeremy Corbyn ahead of 2020 budget – live news | Politics


Cabinet received an update from the health secretary and the prime minister on the coronavirus outbreak. The PM wished Nadine Dorries a speedy recovery, noting that she was following official advice to self-isolate.

The chancellor set out the measures being taken to manage the impact of coronavirus, laying out details of his economic action plan that will be announced at budget.

He outlined how this plan – combined with the measures announced by the governor of the Bank of England this morning – will make the UK one of the best placed economies in the world to manage the potential impact of the virus. The chancellor added the budget will ensure businesses, the public and those in public services working on the front line against the virus get the support they need.

He said despite the impacts of the outbreak being uncertain, we have the economic tools to overcome the disruption caused by the virus and move the country forwards.

The chancellor also said that despite coronavirus being “front and centre in our minds”, the budget will implement the manifesto on which the government had been elected. He said it was vital that people know this is a budget that delivers on the promises made to the British people – investing in public services and cutting taxes for millions of hardworking people – and that there could be no delay in laying the foundations for a decade of growth where opportunity was spread equally across the UK.

The PM said that this budget starts to tackle head on the challenges facing our economy and country – addressing productivity and regional imbalances – and showing that the government is responding to the public’s desire for change. It will set the path for further action through the year.



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Jeremy Corbyn news: JezzFest celebratory event to RETURN – despite election battering | Politics | News


The last Glastonbury-style festival to celebrate the Labour Party leader, dubbed JezzFest, took place in Tottenham, North London in June 2018. Plans for a JezzFest reboot come despite Jeremy Corbyn overseeing the party’s worst general election performance since the 1930s, and admitting he will quit in a matter of weeks. A new JezzFest Twitter account has been opened for the planned event, with a GoFundMe page launched by Nathan Harmer in a desperate bid to raise money for it.

The page has more than 2,000 followers but at the time of writing, just £50 had been donated from a total of four people less than 24 hours after the GoFundMe page was opened.

A tweet on the account says: “Thank you for everyone’s support for this event.

“We’re crowd funding for the event and every penny will help lots.

“Any surplus will be donated to food banks and to homeless charities.

“#JezzFest is going to be epic!”

Twitter user @JakeLex1989, who’s Twitter bio says “#Socialism will prevail, still hoping for a #LabourGov in the future” broke the news of the planned JezzFest reboot.

He tweeted: “OK guys, we’re organising a rally in #Islington some time in early to mid Feb 2020 to show our thanks to @jeremycorbyn.

“Early stages right now but for updates you can follow @JezzFest which is the dedicated account.

READ MORE: Furious Labour MP calls on Corbyn to be replaced as soon as Monday

Another person tweeted: “I wouldn’t mind betting the ERG and the new @Conservatives MPs from former @UKLabour stronghold seats would sponsor the do in grateful thanks for all the help he gave them.”

A third Twitter user wrote: “On behalf of all Tories, I’d love to pay Jeremy our heartfelt thanks for all his hard work over the last four years in helping us stay in power.

“Now he has given us the best Christmas present – a landslide majority. He’s done more for our movement than anyone since Thatcher

Several other Twitter users were so baffled by the relaunch of JezzFest they questioned whether it was actually a joke.

One person said: “Please tell me this is a parody?”

Another Twitter user wrote: “Is this some deep level sarcasm?”

Last year’s event cost a reported £1million to stage but was dominated by dwindling crowds and struggling ticket sales.

The festival was hit by a strong of problems, fuelling fears it was just a vanity project for the Labour leader, who might have been keen on replicating his popularity when he gave a rousing speech at theGlastonbury Festival to tens of thousands of fans a year earlier.

Tickets had been priced at £35 just two days before the event but were quickly slashed to just £10.

Unite, Britain’s biggest trade union and a major donor for the Labour Party, also reportedly spent up to £35,000 buying tickets to hand out to supporters for free.



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Labour leadership contest: who are the runners and riders? | Politics


Rebecca Long-Bailey

Rebecca Long-Bailey

Rebecca Long-Bailey

A close ally of the shadow chancellor, John McDonnell, Long-Bailey has been groomed as a potential leftwing contender for the top job, who launched a slick video about her backstory during the campaign. The Salford MP and shadow business secretary performed well as a stand-in for Corbyn in leadership debates.

During the election campaign, Long-Bailey spearheaded promotion of the party’s plan for a green jobs revolution and was forced to tackle tough questions over its decision to soften its stance on hitting net-zero carbon emissions.

Her father was a Salford docker and trade union representative, and she worked in several service industry jobs before qualifying as a solicitor. But given her close alliance with Corbyn and the left, and the rejection delivered by the electorate on Thursday, members may be nervous.

Emily Thornberry

Emily Thornberry,

Emily Thornberry,

The shadow foreign secretary had a quiet election campaign, which was viewed in some quarters as a sign she would run for leader if Labour lost the election. Others believed she was being kept quiet due to her remain position. She has been faultlessly loyal to Corbyn, despite not always having been on his leftwing side of the party. As a “girly swot” she believes she is good at taking on Boris Johnson. In her acceptance speech in Islington South and Finsbury, she said: “The real fight has to begin now.”

Thornberry will have to fight allegations of being part of the “metropolitan elite”. The image has plagued her ever since she tweeted a picture in 2014 of a house in the Rochester and Strood constituency adorned with three flags of St George and the owner’s white van parked outside, provoking accusations of snobbery. She resigned her shadow cabinet position shortly afterwards.

Thornberry’s formative years may have informed her politics. Her parents divorced when she was seven years old and she moved into a council house with her mother. She and her siblings took free school meals. But her politics remain elusive. She voted against her own government under Blair and Brown but backed Yvette Cooper in the 2015 leadership campaign. As shadow foreign secretary, she has always trodden a careful line that does not stray too far from the leadership on issues such as Russia, Israel and Trident.

Keir Starmer

Keir Starmer

Keir Starmer

The ambitious former director of public prosecutions has led the charge for remain in the shadow cabinet. He has held his Holborn and St Pancras seat since 2015 and been instrumental in shifting Labour’s position towards backing a second Brexit referendum. The party’s stance on Brexit has been blamed by some for the staggering defeat suffered by Labour on Friday. This means Starmer’s ownership of the direction taken could prove problematic if he tries to convince the membership to appoint him as their leader.

Away from Brexit, his politics are less clear. Prior to taking the role of DPP, he worked as a defence lawyer specialising in human rights issues. The Human Rights Act and the broader aspects of the constitution in the UK are in the sights of the Conservative government so his expertise in this area could be a strong sell.

Starmer is the only male runner on this list. There have long been calls for the next Labour leader to be a woman, including most recently from John McDonnell, the party’s shadow chancellor. McDonnell himself, once considered to be a potential candidate, has ruled himself out, as has Richard Burgon, the shadow justice secretary. The Conservatives frequently dig Labour over the fact the party have never had a woman as leader and the Tories have had two female PMs.

Angela Rayner

Angela Rayner

Angela Rayner

The shadow education secretary, a close friend of Long-Bailey’s, said in recent days she would like to support a Labour Brexit deal. She is regarded as a powerful public speaker and was praised for her interventions during the campaign. Some senior Conservatives said they would fear her as an adversary.

On her policy brief, her most controversial moments focused on private schools, which she believes should no longer be subsidised through charitable status.

Rayner’s life is often described as inspirational. She grew up on a council estate in Stockport; had a mother who couldn’t read or write; left school without any qualifications; got pregnant at 16 and left home to bring the child up alone. She qualified as a social care worker and became Unison’s most senior official in the North West region. She describes herself as “soft left” and backed Andy Burnham in the 2015 leadership election.

Jess Phillips

Jess Phillips

Jess Phillips

The MP for Birmingham Yardley is a strong media performer who has built up a significant public profile from the backbenches. Her fiery speeches and witty barbs aimed at the Conservatives, including the prime minister, frequently go viral online. She is also considered a passionate advocate for her constituency and issues on the ground therein.

Corbyn-supporting Labour members are likely to be deeply suspicious of her, as she has frequently been critical of his leadership and the party’s approach to antisemitism.

She has not formally announced her candidacy but wrote a piece for the Observer after the election, which many have viewed as the start of her bid for leadership. The piece discusses the issues of trust with Labour on the doorstep and the challenge of bringing back working-class voters.

Lisa Nandy

Lisa Nandy

Lisa Nandy

The Wigan MP has said she is seriously thinking about running for the leadership. In a piece for the Guardian, Nandy said she believed that, taken individually, many of the policies in Labour’s manifesto were popular with the public and that the election was not won due to any real affection for Boris Johnson and what he stands for.

Nandy has built a reputation as a campaigner for her constituency and others like it, many of which have fallen to the Tories. She helped to create the Centre For Towns thinktank and called for compromise over Brexit.

A soft-left candidate, she resigned from the shadow cabinet in 2016 over Corbyn’s leadership and handling of the EU referendum. Like Phillips, she may be viewed with suspicion from Corbyn supporters.

Yvette Cooper

Yvette Cooper

Yvette Cooper

Yvette Cooper ran against Corbyn for the leadership in 2015 and is viewed as a centrist. Therefore, she would be likely to face an uphill battle to convince the party membership she is the right person for the job.

After losing the leadership election, Cooper focused on becoming a prominent figure on the backbenches, delivering scathing blows to the government in the Commons and has mastered the policy detail on Brexit and home affairs, the latter of which she scrutinises in her role as chair of the home affairs select committee.

She has been an MP since 1997 and held positions including chief secretary to the Treasury and secretary of state for work and pensions when Labour was in government.



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BBC TV debate: Who won the TV debate tonight? Boris Johnson vs Jeremy Corbyn | Politics | News


The difference between results is similar to a preliminary survey which asked people who they thought would win, with 33 percent in favour of Boris Johnson and 28 percent in favour of Jeremy Corbyn.

The latest debate comes as another win for Boris Johnson, who according to more data from YouGov has had a consistently slim lead in television debating. 

In November, when the leaders had their first debate on ITV, YouGov asked people who they believed performed best on television. 

Their snap analysis of 1,646 people found 51 percent believed Boris Johnson performed best, while 49 percent favoured Jeremy Corbyn. 



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General election: Corbyn responds to chief rabbi by saying he won’t tolerate antisemitism ‘in any form’ – live news | Politics














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Corbyn says antisemitism ‘will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever’ under Labour

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Corbyn speaks at launch of Labour’s race and faith manifesto

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Chief rabbi’s attack on Corbyn over antisemitism ‘unjustified and unfair’, says Lord Dubs

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Johnson rules out backing Brexit or independence referendums in hung parliament as price of power





Johnson laughs off question about his unpopularity in Scotland

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