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Meghan Markle’s five pals who gave explosive interview to People mag could be named TODAY in High Court battle


MEGHAN Markle’s five pals who gave an explosive interview to People magazine could be named TODAY in a High Court battle.

The Duchess of Sussex is suing Associated Newspapers, the publisher of the Mail on Sunday, after a “private” letter she sent to her estranged father Thomas Markle was revealed.

⚠️ Read our Meghan and Harry blog for the latest news on the Royal couple.

Meghan Markle is suing the publisher of the Mail on Sunday for revealing the contents of a letter she sent to her estranged father

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Meghan Markle is suing the publisher of the Mail on Sunday for revealing the contents of a letter she sent to her estranged fatherCredit: AFP or licensors

But the publisher has argued that the existence of the letter had been discussed in an anonymous interview given by five of the former actress’ pals to People Magazine.

Meghan’s lawyers last week applied for the duchess’ friends to remain anonymous as part of the proceedings – something the paper’s legal team has opposed.

The 39-year-old says her friends gave the interview without her knowledge, and denies a claim made by ANL that she “caused or permitted” the People article to be published.

In the article published by People in February of last year, the friends spoke out against the bullying Meghan said she has faced, and have only been identified in confidential court documents.

In a written submission to the court, Justin Rushbrooke QC, representing the duchess, said it would be “cruel irony” for the friends to be identified in the privacy case.

However, Antony White QC, acting for ANL, said the unnamed friends are “important potential witnesses on a key issue”.

“Reporting these matters without referring to names would be a heavy curtailment of the media’s and the defendant’s entitlement to report this case and the public’s right to know about it,” he said.

“No friend’s oral evidence could be fully and properly reported because full reporting might identify her, especially as there has already been media speculation as to their identities.”

Mr Justice Warby is due to deliver his ruling on the duchess’s application at 10.30am today.

Meghan Markle wrote a letter to her father after he missed her wedding

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Meghan Markle wrote a letter to her father after he missed her weddingCredit: Splash News
Thomas Markle was not at the 2018 wedding of the couple

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Thomas Markle was not at the 2018 wedding of the coupleCredit: PA:Press Association
The interview with People magazine is at the centre of the legal battle

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The interview with People magazine is at the centre of the legal battle

ANL, publisher of the Mail on Sunday and MailOnline, won the first skirmish in the legal action on May 1, when Mr Justice Warby struck out parts of Meghan’s claim.

This included allegations that the publisher acted “dishonestly” by leaving out certain passages of the letter.

Court papers have since shown Meghan has agreed to pay ANL’s £67,888 costs for that hearing in full.

Meghan is suing ANL over five articles, two in the MoS and three on MailOnline, which were published in February 2019 and reproduced parts of a handwritten letter she sent to her father in August 2018.

The headline on the article read: “Revealed: The letter showing true tragedy of Meghan’s rift with a father she says has ‘broken her heart into a million pieces’.”

The duchess is seeking damages from ANL for alleged misuse of private information, copyright infringement and breach of the Data Protection Act.

ANL wholly denies the allegations, particularly the duchess’s claim that the letter was edited in any way that changed its meaning, and says it will hotly contest the case.

Meghan and Harry now live in the US

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Meghan and Harry now live in the USCredit: Getty Images
Meghan Markle turns 39: Her year in review





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‘Honey trap’ teen who lured man to his death can be named for the first time


A ‘honey trap’ teen who lured a man to his death so her accomplices could steal his BMW can be named for the first time.

Chloe Harkins-Turner, 18, met Ayodeji Habeeb Azeez, 22, in a car park in Anerley, southeast London, before he was murdered on August 4, 2018.

She chatted to him on Snapchat and invited him to spend time together in person before he was stabbed 16 times to his torso, back and shoulders by Kevin Lusala, 22.

The killer lay in wait with his gang while Harkins-Turner hugged the victim in his blue BMW Sedan, before fleeing the scene.

Ayodeji Habeeb Azeez, 22, was stabbed 16 times in his torso, back and shoulders

Mr Azeez managed to stagger out of the car park where he was ambushed leaving a blood trail and collapsed on the floor just outside the entrance.

A doctor tried in vain to save his life by performing an emergency operation in the street.

Police and paramedics also struggled to stem the blood loss from his horrific stab wounds.

Kevin Lusala was jailed for life for murder and conspiracy to rob

Top news stories from Mirror Online

Harkins-Turner, of south London, admitted conspiracy to rob during the trial and was sentenced to a three-year youth rehabilitation order in January this year.

Harkins-Turner, who turned 18 in April, returned to the Old Bailey after flouting her curfew.

She admitted breaching the community order and was released on bail ahead of sentence on 24 July.

Lusala, of Orpington, Kent, was jailed for life for murder and conspiracy to rob and must serve a minimum of 30 years before he can be considered for parole.

Chaise Gray, 24, of Croydon, was convicted of conspiracy to rob and jailed for 10 years.





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B.C. board launches public effort to rename school named after ‘racist’ federal MP – BC


A Vancouver Island school district is embarking on what could be a difficult exercise to rename an elementary school named after a long-serving, controversial former municipal, provincial and federal politician.

The Alberni School District in Port Alberni, B.C., is setting the stage for a public consultation to rename A.W. Neill Elementary School, named for Alan Webster Neill, a former mayor, member of the B.C. legislature and a federal MP who represented the area in the House of Commons from 1921 to 1945.

Neill, known as and advocate for a blue-collar workers, an early backer of the Canada Pension Plan and a supporter of unemployment insurance, was also considered racist for his efforts in the House of Commons to deny voting rights to Asian immigrants, his support of anti-Chinese laws in the B.C. legislature and his approval of Indigenous residential schools.






First Nations’ students successfully petition B.C. government for provincial park name change


First Nations’ students successfully petition B.C. government for provincial park name change

Neill’s own home in Port Alberni included a restriction that it could never be sold to Asian people. He died in 1960 at 91. The home’s covenant was removed earlier this year.

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“In my opinion, his behaviour and his beliefs were so heinous that he doesn’t deserve a spot on a main plaque on any public building,” said Rosemarie Buchanan, a school board trustee who spearheaded a failed 2017 attempt to have the city council drop the name of Neill Street.

“To think we were sending children to a school named after somebody who was an Indian Agent, who believed the residential school system was good for kids,” she said. “He said the Japanese people were a cancer.”


READ MORE:
Indigenous students convince B.C. government to change name of provincial park

The district’s school board said in a statement last month it is considering a name change for the school.

“In the Alberni Valley, much discussion has taken place about the values and actions of A.W. Neill and whether or not A.W. Neill Elementary School should continue to bear this individual’s name,” said school board chairwoman Pam Craig.

She said board trustees propose A.W. Neill elementary become either Compton Elementary School or Kitsuksis Elementary School.


READ MORE:
Name of man behind Komagata Maru incident removed from Vancouver federal gov’t building

Prof. Reuben Rose-Redwood, a social and cultural geography expert at University of Victoria, said there is a long, worldwide history of renaming places, including cities, streets and public squares. He cited the Soviet Union as an example of a country that underwent extensive name changes.


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Victoria’s council approved the removal of a statue of John A. Macdonald, Canada’s first prime minister, from the front entrance at city hall earlier this year.

Rose-Redwood said the two issues are similar.






City of Victoria removes John A. Macdonald statue


City of Victoria removes John A. Macdonald statue

“It speaks to what do we in the present hold as our values of who we choose to honour from the past,” he said. “How can we constructively engage with the past in the present to create a better future.”

He said the debate about to unfold in Port Alberni is healthy.

“We often learn our history, not by having monuments there, but by the debates that arise from people who suggest we should remove monuments.”

The Port Alberni school board will decide by next spring whether to make the name change, said Craig, adding the board is looking for public input.


READ MORE:
Cost to remove statue of John A. Macdonald from Victoria City Hall grows

Buchanan said she knows that people don’t like change.

“Some people have said to me, ‘that was just the way that was at that time.’ There is no get out of jail free card because it was said so many years ago. It is still incredibly racist.”

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Former Port Alberni mayor Mike Ruttan said he expects old history to collide with today’s values during the debate.






Cost of removing John A. Macdonald statue growing


Cost of removing John A. Macdonald statue growing

“I can tell you it isn’t going to be an easy conversation because it isn’t just the name,” said Ruttan, who was mayor when the council rejected a name change for Neill Street.

“Without a doubt, A.W. Neill was racist, but also, we have to think about that time. It was a very racist time and there were what people perceived as a lot of threats to the economy, a lot of threats to safety and all that kind of stuff.”

Neill was the MP during the Great Depression, the years of the Second World War and the growth of residential schools.

Ruttan, a retired school principal, said he went to A.W. Neill school as a youngster. He said he did not know about Neill’s history while growing up in Port Alberni.


READ MORE:
Controversial statue of Judge Begbie removed from outside New Westminster courthouse

“It’s going to be a really interesting community discussion and ultimately the decision, as I understand it, will be made by the school board,” Ruttan said. “Kudos to them if they can work through this decision without alienating people in the larger community.”

Prof. Ian Baird, a geography expert at University of Wisconsin-Madison, said Neill’s views were strong even for the time period.

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“Even for his day and age, and I think this is the very important thing to recognize, he was one of the most racist politicians around,” said Baird. “He was fundamentally against all Asians from the first moment he entered politics. Asians were seen as an economic threat to white people, or at least to him.”

Baird, who owns property in the Port Alberni area, said changing the name of the school is up to the people of Port Alberni, but “it doesn’t seem to me he’s worthy of an honorific.”




© 2019 The Canadian Press







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Greta Thunberg named Time magazine’s 2019 Person of the Year


Greta Thunberg named Time magazine’s 2019 Person of the Year originally appeared on abcnews.go.com

Greta Thunberg was named Time magazine’s 2019 Person of the Year on Wednesday morning. She is youngest figure to receive the distinction in its 92-year history.

The 16-year-old Swedish climate activist has become an iconic face in the fight to save the planet from climate change. Last year, she began spending her Fridays protesting by herself outside the Swedish parliament, and that effort grew to her leading a host of student-led climate strikes involving millions of people in over 170 countries.

Thunberg sailed from England to New York this fall for a United Nations climate summit instead of flying, emphasizing it’s less harmful to the environment. She then drew worldwide attention for her fiery speech at the U.N., where she accused world leaders of stealing her dreams and childhood with their inaction on climate change.

(MORE: Slain Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Capital Gazette staff and persecuted reporters are Time’s Person of the Year)

“Entire ecosystems are collapsing. We are in the beginning of a mass extinction, and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth. How dare you!” she asked at the U.N. in September. “The eyes of all future generations are upon you. And if you choose to fail us, I say — we will never forgive you.”

Thunberg has vowed the marches will continue until world leaders give serious attention to protecting the environment for future generations.

Time also named the World Cup-winning U.S. National Women’s Soccer Team as Athlete of the Year, Lizzo as Entertainer of the Year and Disney CEO Bob Iger as Business Person of the Year.

(MORE: The ‘silence breakers’ of #MeToo movement named Time magazine’s 2017 person of the year)

Known as “Man of the Year” or “Woman of the Year” until 1999, the annual issue of Time magazine profiles a person or group, idea or object, that “most affected the news and our lives, for good or ill, and embodied what was important about the year, for better or for worse,” former Time Managing Editor Walter Isaacson wrote in the 1998 issue. Though the outlet runs an online poll for People’s Choice, the final decision is made by editors.

The other finalists for the magazine’s annual title this year were President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the whistleblower and the Hong Kong protesters.

(MORE: Teen climate activist Greta Thunberg arrives in New York for UN summit on sailboat)

The top 10 contenders included Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, U.S. Women’s National Team Captain Megan Rapinoe, Chinese President Xi Jinping, Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern and Rudy Giuliani, the former mayor of New York City and Trump’s personal lawyer.

Time’s 2018 Person of the Year was “The Guardians” — journalists who have faced persecution, arrest or murder for their reporting — including Jamal Khashoggi, Maria Ressa and the staff of the Capital Gazette newspaper in Maryland.

Time’s first Man of the Year was aviator Charles Lindbergh following his trans-Atlantic flight in 1927.



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London Bridge terrorist named as 28-year-old man previously convicted for terrorism offenc | UK | News


He was arrested with eight other men after plotting to bomb the London Stock Exchange and build a terrorist training camp.

He was ordered to serve at least eight years in prison.

It was reported that Khan had planned to travel to Pakistan-controlled Kashmir and set up a terrorist group on a piece of land owned by his family.

Of the nine men arrested, Khan and two others were described by Judge Mr Justice Wilkie as “the more serious jihadists”.

The judge added that Khan shouldn’t be released until he and the others were considered to no longer be a threat to the public.

However, in 2013, Khan and three other men argued that they shouldn’t have received indeterminate sentences for public protection (IPPs) – special sentences intended to keep prisoners beyond their original minimum term.

The Court of Appeal eventually ruled that the indeterminate sentences originally given to Khan and the others should be replaced with fixed terms and extended licences.

The halfway point of the fixed terms, at which point the men were eligible to be released on license, matched the minimum they originally served before they could seek to leave prison.

JUST IN:London Bridge terrorist named as 28-year-old man previously convicted

Khan was 22-years-old at the time of his arrest in 2010 and had been living in Stoke.

He was ordered to serve at least eight years of his 16-year sentence.

He was told he would be subject to extended licenses of five years beyond his sentence, which are intended to allow the authorities to recall someone to prison.



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