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Man Utd ‘have shirt number ready’ if they seal Jadon Sancho transfer


Manchester United reportedly have a shirt number ready for Jadon Sancho if the Borussia Dortmund winger signs for them this summer.

United are confident they can lure Sancho to Old Trafford this summer – despite the coronavirus pandemic having halted negotiations with the 20-year-old.

There is a feeling at United that if Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side secure Champions League football, they will beat the likes of Chelsea, Liverpool, Manchester City and PSG to Sancho’s signature.

And in a bid to convince him star he can have a great future with United, club chiefs are ready to offer him the iconic number seven shirt, according to the Evening Standard.

Sancho would be following in the footsteps of United legends George Best, Eric Cantona, David Beckham and Cristiano Ronaldo by wearing seven.

Jadon Sancho is Manchester United’s top target this summer

The current incumbent, Alexis Sanchez, has been less successful than his predecessors in the shirt and was shipped out to Inter Milan on loan last summer.

United hope to sell the Chilean this summer, but if they fail to do so they could strip him of the seven shirt anyway and hand it to Sancho, according to Metro.

Sancho has been in superb form again this season, with the player scoring 17 goals and creating 17 assists in all competitions for the Bundesliga side.

It is thought Dortmund would be willing to let him go if they receive an offer they can’t refuse, and they value the 20-year-old at around £130m.

United are set to offer Sancho the iconic number seven shirt worn by Cristiano Ronaldo

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United and PSG could therefore be set for a bidding war for Sancho, who is one of the most highly-sought after young players in the world.

Liverpool have also been linked with a swoop for Sancho in recent months, but it is understood Jurgen Klopp is prioritising a move for RB Leipzig star Timo Werner.





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Man dies and his wife is in critical care after they ‘took fish tank cleaner to cure coronavirus’


Man who tried to treat himself with hydroxychloroquine DIES: Couple ate fish tank cleaner thinking it was the malaria drug that Trump is touting as a miracle coronavirus remedy

  • The couple, both in their 60s, were hospitalized after ingesting chloroquine phosphate, an additive often used at aquariums to clean fish tanks
  • The man died and his wife was left in critical condition as a result  
  • It’s believed that they confused the chemical with hydroxychloroquine, an antimalaria drug that’s shown promising results in treating coronavirus patients 
  • Banner Health, a non-profit hospital system based in Arizona, issued a statement about the shocking case on Monday 
  • In the statement experts warned the public against the use of inappropriate medications and household products to prevent or treat COVID-19  
  • President Trump drummed up excitement over hydroxychloroquine when he called the drug a ‘game changer’ last week
  • But the drug has not yet been proven as effective in treating coronavirus  
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

A man has died and his wife is under critical care after they ingested a chemical found commonly found in fish tank cleaner thinking it was the miracle coronavirus cure President Donald Trump touted at a press conference last week.  

Banner Health, a non-profit hospital system based in Arizona, issued a statement urging the public against the use of inappropriate medications and household products to prevent or treat COVID-19 on Monday. 

To emphasize the importance of the warning, officials disclosed a few details of what happened with an unnamed couple that ignored the advice and took their medical care into their own hands.  

The couple, both in their 60s, were rushed to the hospital about 30 minutes after ingesting chloroquine phosphate, according to the statement. 

It’s believed that they confused the chemical – an additive often used at aquariums to clean fish tanks – with hydroxychloroquine, an antimalaria drug that’s shown promising results in treating COVID-19 patients.  

President Donald Trump touted chloroquine as a 'miracle drug' at a press conference last week, but Dr Anthony Fauci, the White House coronavirus expert, quickly followed Trump's comments by saying more work was needed before it could be heralded as a solution

President Donald Trump touted chloroquine as a ‘miracle drug’ at a press conference last week, but Dr Anthony Fauci, the White House coronavirus expert, quickly followed Trump’s comments by saying more work was needed before it could be heralded as a solution

Dr Fauci (center) has not been at the White House coronavirus task force briefing for two days

Dr Fauci (center) has not been at the White House coronavirus task force briefing for two days

A man has died and his wife is under critical care after they ingested chloroquine phosphate, a chemical found commonly found in fish tank cleaner, thinking it was the miracle coronavirus cure President Donald Trump has been touting at his press conferences

A man has died and his wife is under critical care after they ingested chloroquine phosphate, a chemical found commonly found in fish tank cleaner, thinking it was the miracle coronavirus cure President Donald Trump has been touting at his press conferences

Banner Health experts emphasized that people should not take chloroquine under any circumstances unless it’s prescribed by a doctor.  

‘Given the uncertainty around COVID-19, we understand that people are trying to find new ways to prevent or treat this virus, but self-medicating is not the way to do so,’ said Dr Daniel Brooks, Banner Poison and Drug Information Center medical director. 

‘The last thing that we want right now is to inundate our emergency departments with patients who believe they found a vague and risky solution that could potentially jeopardize their health.’ 

Experts noted that the majority of people diagnosed with the novel coronavirus would recover without complications, and that  ‘the routine use of specific treatments, including medications described as “anti-COVID-19”, is not recommended for non-hospitalized patients’.  

‘We are strongly urging the medical community to not prescribe this medication to any non-hospitalized patients,’ Brooks said. 

The statement did not say whether the couple who ingested chloroquine phosphate had been diagnosed with COVID-19 prior to doing so. 

As of Monday there are nearly 42,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in the US and 576 deaths

As of Monday there are nearly 42,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in the US and 576 deaths

New York state officials are expected to begin trials with hydroxychloroquine on Tuesday, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced at a press conference Monday (pictured)

New York state officials are expected to begin trials with hydroxychloroquine on Tuesday, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced at a press conference Monday (pictured)

Hydroxychloroquine has not yet been proven as effective in battling COVID-19, but President Trump drummed up excitement over it when he called it a ‘game changer’ last week. 

Dr Anthony Fauci, the White House coronavirus expert, quickly followed Trump’s comments by saying more work was needed before it could be heralded as a solution.  

New York state officials are expected to begin trials with the medication on Tuesday, according to Governor Andrew Cuomo.  

Meanwhile, many people across the US have praised the drug and credited it with saving their lives – albeit after they were prescribed it by doctors.  





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Birmingham murders: Police arrest man after two women stabbed to death



A 40-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of a double murder after two women were found stabbed to death in neighbouring houses.

Detectives described the incident in Birmingham as “domestic-related” and said they believed the suspect and the victims were known to each other.

The first woman, aged 43, was found with stab injuries after officers were called to house in the Mosely area of the city at 11am on Monday.


She was pronounced dead at the scene in Belle Walk from stab injuries.

A second woman, aged 52, was found seriously injured in the house next door and died shortly after arriving at hospital.

West Midlands Police said they had launched a double murder inquiry. 

“The tragic events of this morning appear to be domestic related as it’s thought the suspect and the two victims are known to each other,” said Detective Inspector Nick Barnes.

“We’ve closed the area while forensic examinations are carried out and we’ve got specially trained officers supporting the families at this devastating time.

“Two women have lost their lives and we’re doing all we can to understand the circumstances of this tragedy.”

West Midlands Ambulance Service (WMAS) said two ambulances, an advanced paramedic in a critical care car and the West Midlands CARE Team were sent to the scene.

“On arrival, crews found one woman who was sadly confirmed deceased on scene,” the WMAS said in a statement.

“A second woman sustained serious injuries and was in a critical condition. She was given advanced life support before being taken by land ambulance on blue lights to hospital.

“Sadly, despite the best efforts, nothing could be done to save her, and she was confirmed dead at hospital a short time later.”



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How a man convicted of his high school girlfriend’s killing was freed by decades-old DNA evidence


Before Leah Freeman’s body was found outside of her hometown of Coquille, Oregon, in 2000, her gym shoes, one of them bloody, were virtually the only physical clues police had to figure out what had happened to the missing 15-year-old.

Nearly 20 years later, one of those same shoes has played a key role in freeing from prison the only person who has ever been convicted of killing her: Freeman’s high school boyfriend Nick McGuffin.

To this day, no other arrests have been made in Freeman’s case.

“That’s the reason why I’m here…to keep Leah’s name in the light. To bring her name forward, to get somebody to come forward with the truth of what happened. To get resolution for myself, for her family,” said McGuffin, who is now 37.

“I’m an innocent person,” he added. “They found…vindicating DNA evidence that finally shows what I’ve been saying for nearly 20 years.”

Watch the full story on “20/20” Friday, Feb. 28, at 9 p.m. ET on ABC.

McGuffin was a high school senior when he and Freeman, a freshman, were dating.

“I asked Leah if she’d go to the prom with me,” he said. “She had a gorgeous white dress, she had her hair done perfectly… I’m glad we went and got the pictures that we did together.”

But Freeman’s mother, Cory Courtright, had concerns about their relationship. In a 2010 interview with “20/20,” she said she thought McGuffin “seemed like an OK kind of guy,” but she said their age difference bothered her.

“I found out that they were being sexually active, and that was disturbing to me,” Courtright said at the time. “It caused some conflict between Leah and I…because she wanted him to be her boyfriend and I didn’t.”

On the night of June 28, 2000, McGuffin dropped off Freeman at her friend Cherie Mitchell’s house with plans to pick her up a couple of hours later for a double date.

Mitchell said she and Freeman got into an argument about how much time Freeman was spending with McGuffin. She said that Freeman, who was upset, took off on foot after storming out of the house.

“I followed her out to the road and that’s when I told her, ‘It’s just, it’s not about you,’” Mitchell told “20/20” in a 2010 interview. “He was trying to take her away and take her away to do things that I wasn’t really welcome [to join].”

When McGuffin came to pick up Freeman at around 9 p.m., Mitchell told him that Freeman had already left. Freeman was last seen walking alone near her high school in downtown Coquille, according to witness testimony, but she never made it home.

McGuffin said he drove around for hours looking for her.

“I went back to Fast Mart probably five or six times,” he said. “There was different people there every time… They didn’t see Leah. I didn’t see Leah.”

McGuffin said he spoke to police officers on two separate occasions that night as he drove around in his 1967 Ford Mustang. The officers had pulled him over for having a broken headlight.

After the second time, McGuffin said he asked his friend at the time, Kristen Steinhoff whom he said he had run into earlier, to help him look for Freeman. He said he and Steinhoff drove around for about an hour or so in her car.

“I dropped Kristen off. … I think it was around 2:00 [in the morning], probably. I decided to go by Leah’s house one more time,” McGuffin said. “I saw a glare on her window, thought it was her TV. … It was 2000. It’s not like she could send me a text. She couldn’t call me on a cellphone. So I thought she was home, and I went home after that.”

The next day, when Freeman hadn’t turned up, her mother and McGuffin went to the police, who initially treated the 15-year-old’s disappearance as a runaway teen case.

“I knew something was wrong,” Courtright told “20/20” in 2010. “Again, this girl had no reason to run away.”

The night she went missing, a mechanic found and picked up one of her gym shoes by a cemetery near the high school. He believed it may have belonged to one of his kids – but days later, realized it may be connected to the missing girl and turned it into police. Her other shoe was found about a week later, outside of town – with blood on it.

About five weeks after she disappeared, on August 3, 2000, Freeman’s decomposing body was found on a steep wooded embankment, eight miles away through back roads from where the first shoe was found.

When he heard the news, McGuffin said, “It was like my world was over.”

“I broke down,” he continued. “That’s the saddest moment that I’ve ever gone through.”

McGuffin said he voluntarily went to the police to be interviewed and turned over his Mustang in hopes it would help with the investigation.

“[I] tried to give them any information that I knew that may be helpful,” he said.

After his initial meeting with police, McGuffin said he was called in again for questioning. He allowed officers to take photos of him, and later learned that they were checking for defensive wounds.

As time passed, the case went cold. McGuffin said he tried to move on with his life, but that he wasn’t able to grieve for Freeman while people suspected he was responsible. With public perception turned against him, he also said it was “hard to go out in public.”

“You’re basically looking over your shoulder to try to figure out who’s gonna come around the corner, who’s gonna start yelling at you,” he said.

Within two years after her death, McGuffin said he was hospitalized for anxiety and tried to end his life.

“It was just a buildup… It’s like when a tea kettle boils and it starts to make that hum, that’s what it was like, you just get an overload,” he said.

Eventually, McGuffin found a passion for cooking and graduated from culinary school, later becoming head banquet chef at The Mill Casino in North Bend, Oregon. After starting a new relationship, he had a daughter in 2007. He said she brought a sense of renewal into his life.

“I was very excited that I was gonna be a father,” he said. “My daughter helped me through a lot.”

As the years dragged on, police could not make any arrests in Freeman’s case, and the small community of Coquille — a town of about 4,000 residents — became more furious that her killer hadn’t been caught. Freeman’s mother, especially, was upset the case remained unsolved.

In 2008, the town got a new police chief, Mark Dannels, who pushed to have the case re-examined.

“When I arrived in Coquille…everybody was talking about the Leah Freeman case. And one of the expectations as a new police chief was, ‘What are you going to do about it, chief?’” Dannels said. “That’s pretty uncommon, number one, to have a 15-year-old teenager killed in a small community town like that. So you can see where the people were upset. Why hadn’t this been solved? And the more I looked into it, the more I felt I had to do something on this case.”

Dannels assembled a team from across the state to organize and consolidate all the old files and re-examine the case with fresh eyes.

They were surprised to discover how scattered the evidence was, with some of it even as far away as Scotland Yard in London, where it had been sent years ago for testing. Police also discovered rolls of undeveloped film from the original investigation, and spent months working overnight just to figure out what evidence they had to start to reinvestigate the case.

Coquille Police went back through the evidence, interviewing hundreds of witnesses, combing through old witness statements — including McGuffin’s — and retesting old evidence to re-examine it with assistance from the new team of forensic experts.

“When they reopened the investigation…I just figured the truth will come out and the real person or persons would be found. And so, yeah. I mean, I didn’t see any of this coming,” McGuffin said, referring to his eventual arrest.

During this round of investigating, police questioned Steinhoff, the friend who helped McGuffin look for Freeman on the night she disappeared.

Steinhoff told authorities that McGuffin had stopped by her house around midnight, they had done drugs, and when he then tried to have sex with her she says she told him to stop.

McGuffin admitted that he did smoke marijuana and kissed Steinhoff that night, but he said everything else she claimed wasn’t true.

“The things Kristen and I did that night, when we were kissing, was wrong. I accept that,” McGuffin told “20/20.” “It doesn’t mean just because I did that…that I didn’t care about [Leah]. It’s not an easy thing to deal with.”

After hearing from more than 100 witnesses, a grand jury returned an indictment against McGuffin. He was arrested on Aug. 23, 2010, and charged with murder.

At McGuffin’s trial in July 2011, a witness said he had seen McGuffin and Freeman together some time after she left Mitchell’s home. The prosecution argued that the couple quarreled and when it turned physically violent, McGuffin killed her.

McGuffin claims he never saw Freeman after he dropped her off at Mitchell’s home at 7 p.m. that night.

Ten of the 12 jurors voted to convict McGuffin on the lesser charge of manslaughter instead of murder. At the time, Oregon was only one of two states that allowed non-unanimous jury verdicts in criminal felony cases.

“My trial came down to people’s words,” McGuffin said. “My story has really never changed.”

McGuffin was sentenced to 10 years in prison, which he first spent at Snake River Correctional Institution before being sent to a labor camp in Oregon’s Tillamook State Forest due to good behavior.

Steinhoff died five years after McGuffin’s conviction.

In 2014, after McGuffin had been incarcerated for four years, attorney Janis Puracal decided to take up McGuffin’s case.

During her review, Puracal said bombshell evidence was revealed — an unidentified man’s DNA on Leah Freeman’s shoes — that eventually led to McGuffin’s conviction being overturned.

When Freeman’s shoes were first tested in 2000, the Oregon State Police crime lab discovered something that DNA technology 20 years ago could not conclusively characterize. They did not mention it in the official report.

“At the time, we used interpretation guidelines that didn’t necessarily discern or distinguish really low levels of DNA,” Chrystal Bell, Forensic Services Division director for the Oregon State Police, told ABC News. “As a result of that, the analysts at the time chose to be very conservative and chose not to actually call out that potential male DNA because she couldn’t decide what it was. So she made no conclusions or statements about that DNA because it was at a very, very low level.”

At the time, Bell said, it was entirely up to the analyst’s “discretion over what they were going to report.”

When McGuffin went to trial in 2011, the DNA technology had advanced enough that the sample could have been re-analyzed to determine that it was a man’s DNA. But no one connected to the case had asked for retesting because they had no idea the sample existed.

“Had they asked us to re-examine that evidence, we would have done so,” said Bell of the Oregon State Police crime lab. “We don’t always have an automatic trigger to go back and do re-examination every time we get additional evidence, whether it’s two years later or five years later or 10 years later.”

In 2017, however, Puracal made that request.

“Finding that exculpatory DNA on the shoes, that was a huge moment for our case,” Puracal told “20/20.” “That was a game-changer for us. We were looking for DNA that would tell us who actually committed this crime. And here, there was DNA of some other man on the victim’s bloodstained shoe … and never reported. That changed everything for us.”

“I was overly excited to find the DNA,” McGuffin added. “It didn’t match me. … I told my attorneys, I told Janis, ‘Let’s go find out what happened… Let’s solve this case once and for all. I mean, that was my push.”

Judge Patricia Sullivan agreed with Puracal that the revelation of this DNA was a game-changer. In December 2019, she ruled that there is a “reasonable probability” that McGuffin’s guilty verdict would have been different had the presence of the unidentified man’s DNA been disclosed to law enforcement, prosecutors and the defense.

“However, without the DNA evidence, Trial Counsel was reduced to showing that (Nick McGuffin) could not have committed the crime and was not able to produce any evidence of an alternative theory,” wrote Judge Sullivan.

The judge set aside McGuffin’s conviction and remanded it back to the trial court.

Coos County District Attorney Paul Frasier told “20/20” he decided not to seek a retrial for McGuffin for several reasons, including the lab’s report, the fact that key witnesses had died and the jury had been split on the verdict, and Courtright’s wishes.

“She just flat told me, ‘I cannot take the strain of another trial. I can’t do it,’ and she asked me not to try the case again,” Frasier said of Courtright. “That was probably the biggest factor.”

“Nick’s already served, 97 percent of his sentence,” Dannels said. “So we go back, put this all back together, retry it. You put the family back through this again. For what? To say we were right?”

Nine years after he was convicted for a crime that he has always maintained he never committed, McGuffin was able to walk out of prison a free man.

“I just knew that we had to fight and we had to fight for what’s right,” McGuffin said.

However, Judge Sullivan also said in her ruling overturning the conviction this did not demonstrate his innocence.

“There have been cases in the United States where the evidence clearly shows, beyond any doubt, that the person in jail or prison didn’t do it, and that person needs to get out. That’s an exoneration, in my book,” Frasier said. “What happened here was [McGuffin] was ordered to [get] a new trial. I made the decision not to go forward for a new trial. I still stand behind the investigation of this case… There’s evidence in this record to find this defendant guilty. But we have decided, for a variety of reasons, not to go forward at this time. It’s not that I believe he’s not guilty or innocent, it’s I believe it is not appropriate to proceed.”

Puracal said it was “disappointing” that police and prosecution “continue to say that Nick is guilty in this case.”

“The Department of Justice could have appealed the post-conviction court’s ruling and they chose not to,” she said. “It’s important to recognize where the DNA was found. The DNA was found inside Leah’s shoe as well as outside Leah’s shoe. And it’s found in and around bloodstains on her left shoe. That’s important to know.”

In the weeks since his release, McGuffin has tried to piece his life back together.

“After my exoneration…I had an idea of what it was going to be like, and I was wrong. It’s not easy. It’s actually really hard,” he said.

“[The] D.A., law enforcement, a crime lab…should have some accountability for what they did,” he added. “All I’m asking is for accountability and for them to do their jobs properly.”

“There are not enough markers to put it into the database to see if we can identify somebody that way,” Frasier explained. “If we have a suspect, we can get a DNA sample from them send it in and have them compare it. And that’s what we did with the other potential suspects in the case. And they all came back as not being the donor of that DNA.”

The central problem is that even though authorities now definitively have a sample of male DNA, the sample is so small that it can only exclude matches, but it cannot be used to confirm there is a match with a suspect.

“[The sample] is not suitable to put into the FBI’s database for forensic samples and convicted offenders,” Bell added, “The quality of the DNA was not good enough in 2000, it was not good enough in 2010, and it is still not good enough.”

Today, McGuffin is doing his best to reclaim his life, getting accustomed to keyless cars and talk-to-text on a smartphone. He’s also working on re-establishing his relationship with his daughter, who is now 12.

“I look at her with the strength that she has at her age, I think that helps me,” McGuffin said.

Even though his conviction was overturned, McGuffin said finding a new job has been difficult, which has been hard on him because he said he was looking forward to resuming his career as a chef once he was released.

“It’s not an easy feat. The stigma, even now, trying to get a job. … I want to work. I’m passionate about my career,” McGuffin said. “I remain an innocent man. That’s not going to change.”

McGuffin said he still thinks about Freeman and the life she could have had.

“She should be, what, 35 now? … She would have had a family,” he said.

Now that he’s out, McGuffin said he is determined to fight for the truth for Freeman and get answers as to who killed her.

“I want people to come forward with the truth. I just want the truth. I want to know what happened,” he said. “[We] have a chance right now to clean the slate to make it right. I mean, I’m pretty sure a lot of people would want that. I know Leah would. I know her family wants that. I want the truth for them. What more can I ask for?”



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Ole Gunnar Solskjaer speaks out on angry rant at Jesse Lingard during Man City clash


Ole Gunnar Solskjaer was furious with Jesse Lingard during Manchester United’s win over Man City (Sky Sports)

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer insists his angry tirade towards Jesse Lingard during Manchester United’s Carabao Cup clash against Manchester City on Wednesday evening was ‘in the heat of the moment’.

The incident occurred during the second half of their match at the Etihad Stadium as United were chasing a second goal after Nemanja Matic had scored in the first half.

But Lingard’s wayward pass for Fred in the 58th minute was intercepted and City quickly countered to create a one-on-one chance for Raheem Sterling.

Sterling was unable to equalise for City but Lingard’s error sparked a strong reaction from Solskjaer on the touchline.

More: Football

Television cameras which were directed towards the dugout caught Solskjaer shouting: ‘Jesse. One more time and you’re f****** off.’

Lingard was substituted shortly after in the 65th minute.

When asked about the incident after the match, Solskjaer replied: ‘Ah, it was just heat of the moment.

‘Once in a while when you lose the ball just make sure we try to play more.

Solskjaer hugged Jesse Lingard after substituting him (Sky Sports)

‘In the next moment him and Victor [Lindelof] grew in confidence.

‘Once in a while you’re going to make mistakes.

‘But if you’re going to come here and just defend you’ve got no chance.

‘Yes, we created one or two dangerous moments with the way we tried to play our way out.

‘But that’s the way we want the boys to express themselves that we have to do that to release the pressure.’

More: Football

United were unable to score their second goal and were reduced to 10 men with 14 minutes remaining following Matic’s red card.

City won the tie 3-2 on aggregate and Pep Guardiola’s side will play Aston Villa in the final on March 1.

More: Manchester United FC





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Man ordered to perform contract for sale of lands where he lives in Co Dublin


A man has been ordered to perform a contract for the €460,000 sale of lands in Co Dublin where he lives in a house with his partner and father.

The Court of Appeal on Wednesday upheld a High Court order directing specific performance of the 2014 contract executed by Gavin Crowley concerning lands at Newbarn, Kilsallaghan.

In circumstances including that Mr Crowley has a debt of some €1 million to Start Mortgages, the High Court had not erred in refusing to award damages in lieu of specific performance, it held. On the application of David Allen BL, for Brian Leggett, purchaser of the lands, it lifted a stay imposed by the High Court, pending appeal, on the specific performance order.

Giving the Court of Appeal judgment, Ms Justice Caroline Costello said Mr Crowley, a builder, bought the lands in 2002 and constructed a house there. He later provided the property as security for loan facilities advanced to him by Bank of Scotland(Ireland) in 2006 and 2008. After he experienced financial difficulties and defaulted on his loan obligations, the bank demanded repayment of almost €1 million.

In late 2012, after the bank sought possession, Mr Crowley’s solicitors advised the property was for sale. Mr Leggett, who was anxious to buy a home for his family, viewed the property twice and a purchase price of €460,000 was agreed.

A contract for sale was executed about February 24th/25th 2014 with a closing date of March 4th, 2014. After Mr Crowley failed to complete that sale, Mr Leggett issued proceedings for specific performance.

In opposing those, Mr Crowley alleged the contract was illegal and unenforceable because he and Mr Leggett had allegedly agreed on a €65,000 “under the table” cash payment along with the purchase price, thereby under-declaring the stamp duty payable. He also alleged there was a boundary dispute and his house was partly constructed on lands of an adjoining owner in respect of which there were outstanding proceedings.

He further alleged he and his father would suffer hardship for reasons including his father would get no compensation for sums advanced to help Mr Crowley buy the lands in 2002.

The High Court’s Mr Justice Tony O’Connor rejected the claim of an under the counter payment rendering the contract illegal and unenforceable, a finding which was not appealed. He also dismissed the other grounds of defence.

Ms Justice Costello noted trespass proceedings by an adjoining landowner against Mr Crowley were adjourned generally in July 2006 with no further steps taken although a notice of intention to proceed was served in 2012. Mr Crowley had previously specifically confirmed there was no litigation pending or threatened concerning the property and no boundary dispute regarding it, she said.

The High Court accepted Mr Leggett’s evidence he only became aware in 2017 of a possible boundary dispute. It concluded there was no evidence of a continuing dispute in relation to the boundary or alleged trespass and Mr Leggett was aware of the risk in that regard. Ms Justice Costello said a purchaser can elect to take whatever title the vendor has to give. Hardship was never pleaded in advance of the trial and no case was made Mr Crowley and his partner and father will have nowhere else to live, she said.

The High Court had not erred in refusing to order specific performance on the basis of Mr Crowley’s claim he had to sell his family home by reason of his indebtedness and this amounted to hardship.

The High Court finding Mr Crowley had entered the contract willingly was binding on the Court of Appeal, she added.

Mr Crowley was registered as sole owner of the folio and no case was made out of hardship in respect of the father, she held. Mr Crowley had entered into a “binding and enforceable” contract for sale and the purchaser was “entitled to what he bargained for”.



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Man, 58, who went missing in the Grand Canyon for 11 days is found ALIVE


Man, 58, who went missing in the Grand Canyon for 11 days in subzero temperatures is found ALIVE and rescued by helicopter

  • Texas man Martin Edward O’Connor, 58, was found alive on Thursday 
  • He was last seen on December 22 and was found on a rugged South Rim trail 
  • Officials won’t say whether he was injured in temps that dropped to 8 below 

Martin Edward O'Connor, 58, was rescued on Thursday from the Grand Canyon

Martin Edward O’Connor, 58, was rescued on Thursday from the Grand Canyon

A man who had been missing at the Grand Canyon for 11 days has been found alive.

Martin Edward O’Connor, 58, of La Porte, Texas, was located on Thursday morning and flown out of the canyon in a helicopter, National Park Service officials said.

O’Connor was undergoing a medical evaluation, and authorities said he is in stable condition.

Officials declined to release information on whether he suffered injuries as a result of being missing in the park for more than a week during wintry conditions and brutal subzero temperatures.

A view is seen from the New Hance Trail, the rugged path on the South Rim where O'Connor was rescued by helicopter after going missing for 11 days

A view is seen from the New Hance Trail, the rugged path on the South Rim where O’Connor was rescued by helicopter after going missing for 11 days

Temperatures in the area sank as low as -8 degrees overnight during the period he was missing. 

National Park Service rangers found O’Connor on the rugged New Hance Trail, one of the most difficult trails on the canyon’s South Rim.

Rangers warn that the primitive trail is not maintained, and may be the most difficult established trail on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.

Before being located, O’Connor was last seen at a lodge in Grand Canyon Village on December 22.

The lodge is some 18 miles from the trail head of the New Hance Trail where O’Connor was located. 

Before being located, O'Connor was last seen at this lodge in Grand Canyon Village

Before being located, O’Connor was last seen at this lodge in Grand Canyon Village

 



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Ole Gunnar Solskjaer confirms Man Utd transfer interest in Erling Haaland


Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has confirmed that Manchester United are interested in signing his fellow Norwegian Erling Braut Haaland.

The Red Bull Salzburg forward, 19, has been in prolific goalscoring form this season, scoring 24 goals in 20 games in all competitions including eight in the Champions League.

That has led to him being linked with several clubs across Europe, but United are always said to have had an advantage due to Solskjaer’s knowledge of the teenager from their time together at Molde.

Haaland has also been linked with a move to Borussia Dortmund as well as staying within the Red Bull framework at RB Leipzig, but Solskjaer appeared hopeful of signing the teenager when he spoke after United’s 3-0 win over Colchester United in the Carabao Cup on Wednesday.

Haaland has been strongly linked with a move to United

“He is a player I like,” Solskjaer told Norwegian TV channel Viasport .

“We are looking for good players all the time.

“Erling has had a good development, so he has to develop further wherever he decides.

“I don’t need to talk so much about him, but we as a team always look for players who can complement the others we have, and then we see what we end up with.”

Solskjaer has confirmed the interest

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Solskjaer has previously stated that he believes Haaland has already made his mind up about where his future will lie, and says that the crucial thing is that the forward goes to the club that is best for him.

“It’s the most important thing with all the players, after all, wherever they go, that they thrive where you are.” he said.

United will face Manchester City in the two-legged semi-finals of the Carabao Cup in the New Year, with Aston Villa taking on Leicester in the other last four tie.





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Man dies after setting fire to keep warm in Cudahy, authorities say



A man died Monday night in Cudahy after apparently starting a fire in an enclosed dumpster area in an attempt to keep warm, authorities said.

Firefighters responded to a report of a fire behind a store in the 4500 block of Santa Ana Street about 10:30 p.m. and found two dumpsters burning. They put out the flames and discovered the man’s body.

Preliminary investigation indicates that the man climbed into a walled-in and gated enclosure where dumpsters are stored and set a fire beside them to heat himself, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Lt. Derrick Alfred said. He then caught fire, suffering significant burns and probable smoke inhalation, Alfred said.

The man is believed to have been homeless. His name was not immediately released.





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Nebraska man on death row for killing 4 – but Texas woman says she’ll marry him: report


A 33-year-old Nebraska man on death row for killing four people within 10 days in 2013 has at least one friend still in his corner: a 46-year-old Texas woman who reportedly has confirmed that she and the killer plan to marry.

But Dawn Arguello of Lubbock isn’t happy that Nikko Jenkins – who authorities say committed the murders within three weeks of being released from prison on a robbery and assault conviction – recently had her name tattooed on his face.

CALIFORNIA SHOOTOUT, STANDOFF WITH COPS RESULTS IN DEATHS OF WOMAN, 2 CHILDREN

“I was very (ticked) off that he did that,” Arguello told the Omaha World-Herald. “He doesn’t need to be self-mutilating like that.”

Arguello added she isn’t happy about the way her husband-to-be has been portrayed in the local press.

“If you believe the media,” she said, “he’s the most hated man in Nebraska besides Charles Starkweather.”

Nikko Jenkins has been linked to four murders committed within 10 days in 2013, authorities say.

Nikko Jenkins has been linked to four murders committed within 10 days in 2013, authorities say.

The reference was to the 1950s serial killer of 11 people whose story inspired several movies, including “Badlands” in 1973 and “Natural Born Killers” in 1994. After his conviction in one of the murders, Starkweather was executed in Nebraska in 1959 at age 20.

Jenkins is not like Starkweather at all, she said.

“He’s not what the media has made him out to be,” she told the World-Herald. “He’s an enigma. He has feelings. He’s very sensitive.

“He’s not what the media has made him out to be. He’s an enigma. He has feelings. He’s very sensitive.”

— Dawn Arguello, fiancee of death-row inmate

“He’s very intelligent,” she added, “and, yes, he’s very manipulating.”

According to authorities, Jenkins received help from family members in executing the four murders to which he’s been linked. They say he convinced his sister and a female cousin to lure two men with a promise of sex acts in an Omaha park, then Jenkins himself appeared and suddenly blasted the two men in their heads with a shotgun.

A few days later, Jenkins, his sister and another man went to a neighborhood in Omaha, supposedly to commit a robbery. Instead, Jenkins killed the man, authorities said.

Then a few days after that, Jenkins pulled a mother of three out of her SUV and killed her, according to authorities.

Jenkins’ death sentence, issued in 2017, was Nebraska’s first since the state’s voters reinstated capital punishment in a November 2016 vote.

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In 2014, however, the Nebraska Legislature ordered a special investigation into Jenkins’ case because some critics noted that, while in prison prior to the murders, Jenkins had spent more than half of his sentence in solitary confinement. The critics claimed the isolation may have had an effect on his mental health, possibly resulting in the killing spree so soon after he was released.

Arguello met Jenkins while doing volunteer work for a nonprofit organization that advocates for death-row inmates and their families. She also has a criminal record of her own, with convictions for misdemeanor domestic violence, felony child abuse and felony credit card abuse, the World-Herald reported.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.



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