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House of Lords ‘could be moved to York’ by Boris Johnson


House of Lords could be moved to YORK as Boris Johnson ‘reconnects with the country’ and shifts power to Tories’ new northern heartlands

  • Ministers are considering moving the House of Lords to the north or midlands
  • York and Birmingham have been identified as potential sites for the chamber
  • Boris Johnson is determined to reconnect new Tory heartlands with politics 

The House of Lords could be moved to York as Boris Johnson shifts power to his new Tory political heartlands.

The government is considering permanently relocating the second chamber to the north or midlands, in a signal that he is determined to give a voice to the areas that delivered his election victory.

Ministers have hailed efforts to ‘connect with the whole of the country’ after the PM ordered detailed work on the practicalities of putting the Lords in Yorkshire. 

The plans have gone as far as identifying disused land owned by the government near York railway station as a potential site, according to the Sunday Times. 

The Commons could also go ‘on tour’, holding debates away from London, in a bid to reconnect democracy to the wider UK.

International Development Secretary Alok Sharma said he was ‘supportive’ of the relocation and in principle it would be a ‘very good thing’.   

And Tory chairman James Cleverly told Sky News’ Ridge on Sunday: ‘What we are looking at is a whole range of options on making sure the whole of the UK feels properly connected to politics.’

Pressed on whether the government would move the Lords, he said: ‘We might. It is one of a range of things that we are looking at.’  

Boris Johnson is believed to have ordered detailed work on the practicalities of relocating peers (pictured at the state opening last month) to Yorkshire

Boris Johnson is believed to have ordered detailed work on the practicalities of relocating peers (pictured at the state opening last month) to Yorkshire

Relocating the Lords out of London would be a signal of intent from Mr Johnson (pictured) after the Tories created a new powerbase in the north and midlands at the election

Relocating the Lords out of London would be a signal of intent from Mr Johnson (pictured) after the Tories created a new powerbase in the north and midlands at the election

The Lords proposals would use the huge restoration project currently getting under way at Parliament as a springboard for change,

MPs and peers are already due to move out of the building for around six years in 2025 while the multi-billion pound overhaul takes place.

But the idea being mooted in Downing Street is that peers would end up in a new purpose-built building away from London.  

If York was chosen, the city would become a centre of political power for the first time since the English Civil War – when it played host to the Council of the North. 

The three-hour travel time is seen as manageable, with technology deployed to minimise the need to be in the same location as MPs and ministers. 

One senior government source told the Sunday Times: ‘The York proposal is much further along. 

‘The PM is also keen to have parliamentary sessions in the regions, be it Sunderland or Manchester, so people get a chance to feel democracy in action first hand.’ 

James Cleverly

Alok Sharma

Tory chairman James Cleverly (left) and International Development Secretary Alok Sharma (right) confirmed that the Lords relocation is on the cards  

The Commons (pictured) could also go 'on tour', holding debates away from London, in a bid to reconnect democracy to the wider UK

The Commons (pictured) could also go ‘on tour’, holding debates away from London, in a bid to reconnect democracy to the wider UK



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‘You ain’t seen nothing yet’: Boris Johnson  gathers new Cabinet


How Boris’s week in Westminster shapes up

TODAY:  Boris Johnson has held the first meeting of his new Cabinet.

The Speaker will be formally elected – with Lindsay Hoyle expected to be installed without a vote.  

The process of swearing in all 650 MPs – apart from Sinn Fein who don’t take their seats – will begin, and take two days.

THURSDAY: Queen’s Speech sets out the government’s legislative programme. 

FRIDAY: The Commons sits formally and the government will put forward the EU Withdrawal Bill for its second reading vote. 

Boris Johnson gathered his new ‘people’s Cabinet’ today after sending an emphatic message to Brussels that he will not countenance any further delays to Brexit.

The PM and his top team met in Downing Street after it was revealed that withdrawal legislation is being amended to rule out any extension of the transition period beyond December 2020.

Mr Johnson said the Tory victory in the election was ‘seismic’ and he was determined to lead a ‘people’s government’.

‘The voters of this country have changed this government and our party for the better, and we must repay their trust now to change our country for the better,’ he said.

He added: ‘You ain’t seen nothing yet.’ 

Mr Johnson told ministers they should have ‘no embarrassment about saying we are a people’s government and this is a people’s Cabinet’. 

The meeting came after Mr Johnson moved to scotch speculation that he could embrace a softer Brexit in the wake of his election landslide.

His official spokesman said he would insist on a ‘Canada-style free trade agreement with no political alignment’ – abandoning the closer ties planned by Theresa May.

And parliament will lose its veto over the negotiating mandate Mr Johnson will take into next year’s trade talks.

The tough line cast a dampener on the ‘Boris Bounce’ that has seen markets surge in the wake of the Tory landslide. 

The Pound lost ground against the US dollar and euro this morning, while the FTSE 100 stalled – reflecting fears that a full trade deal might not be ready in time for the end of the ‘standstill’ period when the UK will still be within EU rules. 

Boris Johnson told his Cabinet this morning that the Tory victory in the election was ‘seismic’ and he was determined to lead a ‘people’s government’

The cameras were briefly allowed in to record the start of the first Cabinet meeting since Mr Johnson secured his historic landslide last week

The cameras were briefly allowed in to record the start of the first Cabinet meeting since Mr Johnson secured his historic landslide last week

Earlier, Brexit minister Michael Gove played down the prospects of the UK leaving without a full trade agreement at the end of the transition period. 

‘We are going to leave the European Union on 31 January because of the Withdrawal Agreement,’ he told BBC Breakfast. 

‘And then the political declaration, which goes alongside the withdrawal agreement, commits both sides to making sure that the follow-up conversations are concluded by the end of 2020.’

Asked if the UK could end up on limited World Trade Organisation terms, he said: ‘No. We are going to make sure we get this deal done in time.’

Pushed on the issue again he said: ‘We will get a deal and the political declaration commits both sides to that.’ 

Mr Johnson posed with 109 newly-elected Conservative MPs in Parliament last night as the surging Tories flexed their muscles and the Prime Minister started to shape his new administration.  

A Downing Street source said the Withdrawal Agreement Bill would ‘legally prohibit the Government from agreeing any extension’ to the transition, which takes effect once the exit legislation is passed.

It means that the transition period – during which free movement and EU laws continue to operate – will definitely end in December 2020.

The agreement struck with the EU left wriggle room on the end date of the implementation phase, and that was reflected in the previous text of the legislation. In part that was because Mr Johnson needed the broadest possible support among MPs to have a hope of getting the Bill through. 

Geoffrey Robinson

Esther McVey

Geoffrey Robinson (left) and Esther McVey (right) were among the ministers in Downing Street for Cabinet today

The PM's maverick aide Dominic Cummings was at work today as the government ramped up its Brexit stance

The PM’s maverick aide Dominic Cummings was at work today as the government ramped up its Brexit stance

Boris Johnson posed with dozens of newly-elected Conservative MPs in Westminster Hall in Parliament on Monday

Boris Johnson posed with dozens of newly-elected Conservative MPs in Westminster Hall in Parliament on Monday 

The 109 new Tory MPs with Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Numbered from 1-11 are Sara Britcliffe, Jonathan Gullis, Chris Loder, Imran Ahmad Khan, Aaron Bell, Mark Fletcher, Elliot Colburn, Lee Anderson, Antony Higginbotham, Dehenna Davison and Virginia Crosbie

The 109 new Tory MPs with Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Numbered from 1-11 are Sara Britcliffe, Jonathan Gullis, Chris Loder, Imran Ahmad Khan, Aaron Bell, Mark Fletcher, Elliot Colburn, Lee Anderson, Antony Higginbotham, Dehenna Davison and Virginia Crosbie

The mass of MPs stood behind Mr Johnson showed just how much his fortunes have changed with the PM now in control of 365 seats in the House of Commons

The mass of MPs stood behind Mr Johnson showed just how much his fortunes have changed with the PM now in control of 365 seats in the House of Commons

However, the Tory majority of 80 in the wake of the election means there is no danger that the government will struggle to get its tougher version through.  

The move is designed to show Brussels that the PM will not soften his stance when trade talks begin next year.

Michel Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator, has warned that securing a complete deal by next December is unrealistic. EU sources yesterday said only a ‘bare bones’ agreement could be nailed down by then – leaving some sectors facing ‘partial No Deal’ terms. 

The latest moves are designed to end speculation in Brussels that, cushioned by his 80-seat majority, Mr Johnson will now turn his back on Eurosceptic MPs and adopt a softer approach to Brexit.

A No 10 source said: ‘Within a couple of hours of the exit poll last week, there were people in Brussels briefing that we would extend the implementation period and go for a high-alignment model.

‘The reality is that the PM wants a Canada-style free trade agreement, with the freedom to diverge where it suits our economy. And he has given a binding commitment on the campaign trail that we are not extending.

‘People in Brussels need to process that and schedule the talks and their expectations accordingly.’

The implementation period is due to run until the end of December 2020. It is designed to secure a smooth switchover, giving business time to prepare.

A loophole negotiated by Mrs May allows the UK to extend the transition period up until the end of December 2022 to allow more time to complete trade talks.

It was retained in Mr Johnson’s deal in the autumn but he has always insisted that he had no intention of using it.

Mr Johnson looked in high spirits as he mixed with fans and the newly-appointed MPs and posed for selfies in Westminster today

Mr Johnson looked in high spirits as he mixed with fans and the newly-appointed MPs and posed for selfies in Westminster today

The PM met with the cohort of fresh-faced MPs in Westminster Hall in a show of strength to their opponents after last week's election landslide

The PM met with the cohort of fresh-faced MPs in Westminster Hall in a show of strength to their opponents after last week’s election landslide

Prime Minister Boris Johnson poses for photographs as he welcomes the newly elected Conservative MPs at the Houses of Parliament in Westminster

Prime Minister Boris Johnson poses for photographs as he welcomes the newly elected Conservative MPs at the Houses of Parliament in Westminster

Ministers had pledged to give MPs a vote next summer on whether to extend the transition period. But sources said this provision had been removed from the withdrawal legislation and replaced with a clause specifically ruling out an extension.

Senior Tories are stressing Mr Johnson is not pursuing the kind of ‘high alignment’ deal envisioned by Mrs May, which would have seen the UK follow EU rules on goods in return for frictionless trade.

Instead, he is seeking a comprehensive free trade deal, where both sides keep barriers to trade at a minimum but reserve the right to diverge on regulations in certain sectors.

A No 10 source said: ‘We will determine the areas where we want to align with the EU. 

‘There may well be areas where we want to, but it will be our decision.’

Former Brexit secretary David Davis told BBC Radio Four’s Today programme: ‘Boris himself does want to diverge. 

‘We both resigned from Theresa May’s cabinet because we wanted divergence.’

Mr Davis said he would not expect to see divergence in sectors like the car industry, where global standards operate. 

But he said it was vital to break with Brussels in the growth areas such as big data.

A senior EU official said: ‘You could get a partial or basic deal done but it would be hugely damaging to the British economy, because you’ll be leaving on a partial No Deal. 

‘Which sectors will obviously depend on what bits we can agree on before December 2020, but it can’t all be done.

‘We have heard Mr Johnson say things before that he hasn’t followed through on, so I think we will wait and see if the transition period is extended.’

Brussels is said to be keen to extend the transition period and is considering offering a discount on the UK’s £10billion annual membership fee as a lure.   

Prime Minister Boris Johnson addresses newly-elected Conservative MPs at the Houses of Parliament today after winning his huge majority

Prime Minister Boris Johnson addresses newly-elected Conservative MPs at the Houses of Parliament today after winning his huge majority

A smiling Boris Johnson poses for a selfie as he greets newly-elected Conservative MPs at the Houses of Parliament today

A smiling Boris Johnson poses for a selfie as he greets newly-elected Conservative MPs at the Houses of Parliament today

Prime Minister Boris Johnson poses for a selfie as he greets newly-elected Conservative MPs at the Houses of Parliament, London

Prime Minister Boris Johnson poses for a selfie as he greets newly-elected Conservative MPs at the Houses of Parliament, London

The PM met with the cohort of fresh-faced MPs in Westminster Hall in a show of strength to their opponents after the Conservatives sensationally succeeded at redrawing the UK’s political map at the election last week. 

The mass of MPs stood behind Mr Johnson showed just how much his fortunes have changed with the PM now in control of 365 seats in the House of Commons and a majority of 80.

He will now be able to deliver on his ‘Get Brexit Done’ mantra and take the UK out of the EU by January 31.

Downing Street today announced that MPs will be asked to vote on the PM’s Brexit deal on Friday so that the process of delivering an orderly departure from Brussels can begin before Christmas and can then be finalised next month. 

Meanwhile, Mr Johnson tonight moved to shore up his top team as he handed Nicky Morgan a life peerage to allow her to continue as Culture Secretary as he also appointed Simon Hart to be his new Welsh Secretary.  

Mrs Morgan stepped down as an MP at the election but Downing Street said this evening she would be made a peer in the House of Lords which will allow her to continue in the Cabinet. 

Meanwhile, Mr Hart, previously a junior minister at the Cabinet Office, will fill the position vacated by Alun Cairns who resigned at the start of the election campaign over claims he knew a Conservative candidate had sabotaged a rape trial.  

The two announcements mean Mr Johnson now has a full slate of secretary of states in his new administration.  

Mr Johnson called a General Election to break the parliamentary deadlock over Brexit and was rewarded with a clear majority of 80

Mr Johnson called a General Election to break the parliamentary deadlock over Brexit and was rewarded with a clear majority of 80

The Prime Minister took time to share some wisdom with his new MPs, on a day where he also announced a mini-reshuffle of his cabinet

The Prime Minister took time to share some wisdom with his new MPs, on a day where he also announced a mini-reshuffle of his cabinet

Mr Johnson was given a warm welcome by the newly-elected MPs, speaking to them before they posed for photos together

Mr Johnson was given a warm welcome by the newly-elected MPs, speaking to them before they posed for photos together

The PM has decided not to make any further changes to his Cabinet, keeping his powder dry for a major shake-up after Brexit which could see up to a third of existing ministers axed along with a major overhaul of Whitehall departments. 

Mrs Morgan’s elevation to the upper chamber means junior culture ministers will be tasked with representing the government in the House of Commons. 

The move by Number 10 to make Mrs Morgan a peer sparked a furious reaction from some Labour MPs who said the decision ‘stinks’ and represents ‘two fingers up to democracy’. 

The appointment of Mrs Morgan and Mr Hart came after Mr Johnson vowed to bring back his Brexit divorce deal for MPs to vote on at the end of this week as he looks to hit the ground running after his election victory. 

The premier’s new ‘people’s government’ will immediately start work on implementing key campaign pledges on tougher border controls, extra cash for the NHS and a big infrastructure boost for the north of England.  

But his key focus will be making sure he is able to ‘get Brexit done’ and he today laid the groundwork for MPs to vote on his EU accord on Friday – the day after the Queen’s Speech. 

Mr Johnson insisted during the election campaign that he wanted to make Brexit progress before Christmas and Downing Street has identified Friday as the day to make that happen. 

The plan is to re-introduce the Withdrawal Agreement Bill and then ask MPs to vote to give it a second reading with the rest of the legislative stages then taking place in January.

In order for the vote to take place Number 10’s proposed timetable will have to be signed off by new Commons Speaker Lindsay Hoyle who is expected to be installed when parliament returns tomorrow.  

Nicky Morgan has been made a life peer so that she can continue to serve in Boris Johnson's Cabinet as Culture Secretary

Nicky Morgan has been made a life peer so that she can continue to serve in Boris Johnson’s Cabinet as Culture Secretary

Simon Hart, pictured in Whitehall today, has been made Welsh Secretary in Mr Johnson's new administration

Simon Hart, pictured in Whitehall today, has been made Welsh Secretary in Mr Johnson’s new administration

Mr Johnson (pictured at Downing Street today) is welcoming 109 new Tory MPs to Westminster with a message that addressing voters' concerns now could see the Tories win a record fifth term in 2024

Mr Johnson (pictured at Downing Street today) is welcoming 109 new Tory MPs to Westminster with a message that addressing voters’ concerns now could see the Tories win a record fifth term in 2024

However, the Tories are hopeful Mr Hoyle will back the plan so MPs can vote and then head home for a brief Christmas break before then finishing the passage of the bill next month ahead of the January 31 divorce deadline. 

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: ‘We plan to start the process before Christmas and will do so in the proper constitutional way in discussion with the Speaker.’ 

The PM met with key ministers and aides in Downing Street today as he got back to work after the Conservatives smashed Labour at the ballot box last week, making the passage of his Brexit deal a formality.

Speaking to reporters outside No10, Chancellor Sajid Javid said: ‘Welcome to the people’s government.’ 

Mr Johnson welcomed the 109 new Tory MPs to Westminster this afternoon with a message that addressing voters’ concerns now could see the Tories win a record fifth term in 2024 – and rule throughout the 2020s.  

Speaking to reporters outside No10, Chancellor Sajid Javid said: 'Welcome to the people's government.'

Dominic Raab

Speaking to reporters outside No10, Chancellor Sajid Javid said: ‘Welcome to the people’s government.’ Foreign Dominic Raab was also in Downing Street today

Jacob Rees-Mogg was in Whitehall today as the government moved back into action after the election battle

Jacob Rees-Mogg was in Whitehall today as the government moved back into action after the election battle

The PM is pictured as the election results came in, his chief strategist Dominic Cummings watches on in the background. will carry out a minor reshuffle today to fill gaps left by the departures of former culture secretary Nicky Morgan and former Welsh secretary Alun Cairns.

The PM is pictured as the election results came in, his chief strategist Dominic Cummings watches on in the background. will carry out a minor reshuffle today to fill gaps left by the departures of former culture secretary Nicky Morgan and former Welsh secretary Alun Cairns.

A massive reshuffle in February is also expected to coincide with a big shake-up of Whitehall. 

Tory sources said last night the PM is considering splitting up the Home Office to create a new Department for Borders and Immigration to deliver on his pledge to cut the number of low-skilled migrants coming to the UK. 

The new department will focus on putting in place an Australian-style points-based immigration system and toughening up the UK’s borders – leaving the Home Office to focus on the fight against crime.

A number of other Whitehall departments are also expected to be overhauled to make the government ‘match fit’ for Brexit. 

The PM’s top aide Dominic Cummings, who was pictured arriving in Downing Street this morning in one of his now trademark casual outfits, will play a key role in the shake-up of the machinery of government. 

It emerged today that Mr Cummings will also take aim at the Ministry of Defence to improve the way in which the UK spends money on its armed forces.

Jeremy Corbyn ally Andy McDonald accuses the BBC of ‘consciously’ trying to help the Tories win

A close ally of Jeremy Corbyn today accused the BBC of ‘consciously’ trying to get the Tories elected.

Shadow transport secretary Andy McDonald was condemned by colleagues after making the extraordinary claim during an interview as the party goes into meltdown after its election rout.

Mr McDonald initially paid lip service to the idea that the Labour leadership was to blame for the drubbing – its worst performance since the 1930s.

But when asked by presenter Justin Webb whether Jeremy Corbyn’s unpopularity had been a factor, Mr McDonald said: ‘Don’t get me started on the media, Justin. I’m very worried about our public service broadcaster.’ 

Mr McDonald then referred to a moment in the run up to the election when BBC political correspondent Alex Forsyth had referred to Boris Johnson potentially winning a ‘majority that he so deserves’. 

The BBC later said the incident was a ‘slip of the tongue’ but Mr McDonald suggested it was evidence of bias against Labour.  

Mr Johnson will also use a £100billion infrastructure fund to reward voters in the Midlands and the North who voted Conservative for the first time.

His strategy of ‘Boosterism’ will involve pumping cash into neglected regions in an attempt to increase opportunity.

In a message to supporters yesterday, he said: ‘Let’s unite this country, let’s spread opportunity to every corner of the UK, with superb education, superb infrastructure and technology. Let’s get this done and move forward.’

On Thursday, he will unveil his Queen’s Speech which will legislate to deliver an extra £34billion funding for the NHS.

His programme will also include a framework for the immigration system, together with new laws to increase the amount that migrants pay to use the NHS.

Other measures will include longer sentences for terrorists and serious criminals, laws to limit the impact of strikes in the public sector and measures to end no-fault evictions for renters – addressing day-to-day concerns of voters.

Commuters using Northern Rail and South West Trains have been hit by damaging strikes this year. A new Minimum Service Agreement Bill would force unions to guarantee a certain level of services – probably 50 per cent – to reduce the impact on commuters. 

Speaking ahead of the PM’s meeting with new Tory MPs, a No 10 source said: ‘The seismic events on Thursday returned Conservative MPs in Bolsover, in Blyth and in Bishop Auckland to name but a few.

‘This election and the new generation of MPs that have resulted from Labour towns turning blue will help change our politics for the better.

‘The PM has been very clear that we have a responsibility to deliver a better future for our country and that we must repay the public’s trust by getting Brexit done.

‘Our job is to serve the people of this country, and the ‘People’s Government’ will deliver on the people’s priorities.’

Dominic Cummings, pictured arriving in Downing Street this morning, is expected to play a leading role in a Whitehall shake up next year

Dominic Cummings, pictured arriving in Downing Street this morning, is expected to play a leading role in a Whitehall shake up next year

Mr Cummings, who arrived at Number 10 wearing what has become one of his trademark casual outfits, has long called for big changes to be made to the way in which Whitehall works

Mr Cummings, who arrived at Number 10 wearing what has become one of his trademark casual outfits, has long called for big changes to be made to the way in which Whitehall works

Nicky Morgan

Alun Cairns

He will carry out a minor reshuffle today to fill gaps left by the departures of former culture secretary Nicky Morgan and former Welsh secretary Alun Cairns

Jubiliant Tory MPs are descending on Parliament today after the ‘blue tsunami’ of the election.

Triumphant Conservatives are reporting for duty in Westminster after demolishing Labour’s ‘Red Wall’ of Leave-backing strongholds in the North, Midlands and Wales.

Dehenna Davison – the first Tory ever to represent Bishop Auckland – tweeted a picture of herself with a backpack having been given her induction by Commons staff – joking that was like Paddington Bear. 

How Boris’s week in Westminster shapes up

TODAY: MPs are returning to Parliament after the drama of the election.

They will go through inductions, and start being allocated equipment and offices.

This evening Boris Johnson is due to hold a reception on the estate for the 109 new Tory MPs returned in his landslide victory.

TOMORROW: The process of swearing in all 650 MPs – apart from Sinn Fein who don’t take their seats – will begin.

THURSDAY: Queen’s Speech sets out the government’s legislative programme. 

FRIDAY: The Commons sits formally and the government will put forward the EU Withdrawal Bill for its second reading vote. 

Others shared photos of their trips to the London and at Parliament, clearly excited to start fulfilling their promises to secure Brexit. 

Mr Sunak told the BBC’s Andrew Marr show yesterday that the Government’s focus was on delivering Brexit and then ‘levelling up across the United Kingdom, making sure that opportunity is spread’. 

Mr Gove told Sky News: ‘We need to make sure that economic opportunity is more equally spread across the whole country and we need to invest in the infrastructure and also the improvement for skills and education necessary in order to make sure that opportunity is more equal.’

New Bishop Auckland MP Dehenna Davison, Stockton South MP Matt Vickers, Darlington MP Peter Gibson, Sedgefield MP Paul Howell and Redcar MP Jacob Young dubbed themselves ‘the Blue Wall’ as they caught the train down to London together from the North East.

Just days after Mr Johnson’s historic landslide, Tory strategists already have their eye on the next election. A senior source said: ‘The first six to 12 months are key. People have got real expectations of change and we have got to show we are delivering it.

‘People need to feel this first term has worked for them, they need to be able to point to things locally that have changed, they need to feel that their lives have got better – otherwise they will not vote for us again. That is not easy and we need to refocus the whole of government to do it.

‘A lot of people are putting their faith in us for the first time and we sure as hell have to make sure we don’t let them down.’

MPs will be sworn in over the next two days ahead of the Queen’s Speech which will be dominated by meeting Mr Johnson’s election pledges. The new programme will also include amendments to the Human Rights Act to prevent ‘vexatious claims’ against British troops, and a new Sentencing Bill to introduce a mandatory minimum 14-year term for adults convicted of serious terrorist offences.

Measures will also be brought forward to guarantee greater funding for schools. And there will be an end to automatic early release for serious violent offenders. 

Boris Johnson warns new MPs: We’ve only got 18 months to repay voters’ trust 

The Prime Minister has told his army of new MPs they have just 18 months to show first-time Tory voters that they will ‘repay their trust’.

In a rousing address at Westminster, Boris Johnson told his 109 new MPs that he was ‘in awe’ of their achievements last week, when many of them overturned big Labour majorities to help him secure a landslide victory.

Sources in the behind-closed-doors meeting revealed that Mr Johnson repeatedly stressed the need for the Conservatives to ‘repay the trust of the millions who voted for us’.

The premier said it had ‘not been easy’ for many lifelong Labour supporters in the Midlands and the North to abandon their tribal loyalties and support the Conservatives.

But he added: ‘They have changed our party for the better – and they have allowed us to begin the work of changing the country for the better.’

The PM also singled out former Remainers who backed the Conservatives because they recognised the need to deliver on Brexit. He said that it was vital that the new relationship with the EU demonstrated the ‘warmth, sympathy and love’ many felt for Europe.

And he predicted that leaving the EU would be the trigger for a national healing process after three-and-a-half years of rancour and division. According to one source in the room, he declared: ‘We need to get on with the healing. Let the healing fountain of Brexit juices start! Let people come together.’

But Mr Johnson also warned his audience that the Government needed to act quickly to show that it was responding to the concerns of its new voters, not just by delivering on Brexit, but also by meeting pledges on the NHS and schools and investing billions in improving the infrastructure and opportunities in left-behind areas.

Stressing the need for urgency, he said: ‘Time is a wasting asset. The future of this government will be set in the first 18 months. We have got to get it right now. It is vital that we get off on the right foot.’ As Mr Johnson left the reception, one member of parliamentary catering staff told him she voted for him. He said: ‘Thank you very much.’

The speech came as the PM hosted a reception for MPs on the Commons terrace, attended by Sajid Javid, Liz Truss, Matt Hancock, Alok Sharma, former prime minister Theresa May and Gavin Williamson.

Speaking after the event, former Brexit secretary David Davis said: ‘That room hasn’t been that full for one of those functions since the year I came in, ’87. That was the last time we had a majority this big, and that was the triumphant Thatcher after her third election when Labour was flat on its back.’

He added: ‘The one thing about our prime minister is he absolutely knows how to work a crowd. I think the substantive thing he had to say was we have to justify their trust. We have to earn their trust.

‘A lot of people in there did not expect to be there.

‘These are seats where you wouldn’t have gone in thinking I’m going to win, or even I’ve got a decent chance.

‘These are Labour communities, not just Labour voters and that was why we all sort of didn’t believe it. So when it happened, it was a sociological change as much as a political one. We have to entrench it.’

Fellow Tory Mark Francois said: ‘He made a particularly good joke, we turned Redcar to Blue… Unsurprisingly it was very upbeat and went down very well down there.’

Asked how the speech was, Sajid Javid said afterwards: ‘Fantastic. People’s government.’

Meanwhile, Matt Hancock said that it was ‘very cheerful’.

Earlier, Mr Johnson told his new army of MPs in Westminster Hall after a photograph that they had ‘changed our party for the better’.

And he asked his colleagues about his Brexit deal, in full Christmas pantomime style: ‘What culinary characteristic does it have?’ They replied: ‘Oven ready!’

ANDREW PIERCE: The Tories’ latest cohort couldn’t provide a better portrait of contemporary Britain

Among the wave of 109 new Tory MPs who demolished Labour’s ‘Red Wall’, there isn’t a single Old Etonian in sight. Instead, the Tories’ latest cohort couldn’t provide a better portrait of contemporary Britain…

Youngest Tory MP

Sara Britcliffe, 24

Constituency: Hyndburn, majority of 2,951.

Family: Her victory was sweet revenge for her father Peter, who twice tried and failed to win the constituency for the Tories.

Education: Modern languages graduate from Manchester University

Occupation: Used to run a sandwich shop.

Fun fact: The Tories’ youngest MP, at the age of 22 she took a gap year from university to be the youngest Mayoress in the country – when she officiated by the side of her father, a councillor for more than 30 years, in Hyndburn.

The 109 new Tory MPs with Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Numbered from 1-11 are Sara Britcliffe, Jonathan Gullis, Chris Loder, Imran Ahmad Khan, Aaron Bell, Mark Fletcher, Elliot Colburn, Lee Anderson, Antony Higginbotham, Dehenna Davison and Virginia Crosbie

The 109 new Tory MPs with Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Numbered from 1-11 are Sara Britcliffe, Jonathan Gullis, Chris Loder, Imran Ahmad Khan, Aaron Bell, Mark Fletcher, Elliot Colburn, Lee Anderson, Antony Higginbotham, Dehenna Davison and Virginia Crosbie

Trade union rep

Jonathan Gullis, 29

Constituency: Stoke-on-Trent North, majority of 6,286. First Tory MP since the constituency was created in 1950.

Family: Father was a cleaner at the local school who went to night school and ended up at Durham University gaining a Masters degree. His grandfather was a lorry driver.

Education: Local state school. Joined Tory Party aged 18.

Occupation: Birmingham secondary school teacher. Unusually for a Tory, he is the school’s trade union representative.

Fun fact: Hours after being made an MP, he rushed back to the classroom to teach his pupils.

Former rail guard

Chris Loder, 38

Constituency: West Dorset, majority of 14,106 and a swing of 4.5 per cent.

Family: Grew up on a fourth-generation family farm in Dorset where he still lives.

Education: Attended the local state comprehensive and never went to university.

Occupation: Worked as a train guard and eventually became head of new trains at South Western Railway.

A member of the RMT union, he crossed a picket line last month to try to keep South Western trains running.

Fun fact: Is a church organist and church bell ringer.

The mass of MPs stood behind Mr Johnson showed just how much his fortunes have changed with the PM now in control of 365 seats in the House of Commons

The mass of MPs stood behind Mr Johnson showed just how much his fortunes have changed with the PM now in control of 365 seats in the House of Commons

The openly gay Muslim

Imran Ahmad Khan, 47

Constituency: Wakefield, majority of 3,358. The first time the constituency has voted Tory since 1931.

Family: His father was a doctor, his mother an NHS nurse. Made history as the first openly gay Muslim elected politician in the world.

Education: Privately educated, he studied Russian at the Pushkin Institute in Moscow and War Studies at King’s College London.

Occupation: Worked for the United Nations, advertising agency M&C Saatchi and as a counter-terrorism expert.

Fun fact: As a late replacement candidate, he was accused by Labour of being parachuted into Wakefield. The local lad’s response? By literally parachuting in.

TV quiz show winner

Aaron Bell, 39

Constituency: Newcastle-under-Lyme, majority of 7,446. First time Labour has relinquished the seat in more than 130 years.

Family: Married with three children.

Education: St Olave’s grammar school, Kent. Then studied Politics, Philosophy and Economics at Oxford.

Occupation: Business analyst who launched a financial technology firm.

Fun fact: He is a brainiac who has appeared on various TV quiz shows and walked away with £25,000 on Deal or No Deal. Reached the University Challenge final in 2001.

The LGBT activist

Mark Fletcher, 34

Constituency: Bolsover, majority of 5,299. Defeated Dennis Skinner, the so-called Beast of Bolsover, 87, the MP since 1970.

Family: Grew up in Doncaster. Lived on his own after his mother died when he was 17. Outspoken LGBT activist who met his partner at university.

Education: Went to a local state school and was president of the Cambridge University Students’ Union for two years.

Occupation: Worked for a private health company and as chief adviser to Lord Popat of Harrow.

Fun fact: Helped write a book called: ‘A British Subject. How to make it as an immigrant in the best country in the world.’  

The PM met with the cohort of fresh-faced MPs in Westminster Hall in a show of strength to their opponents after last week's election landslide

The PM met with the cohort of fresh-faced MPs in Westminster Hall in a show of strength to their opponents after last week’s election landslide

Campaigning since 13

Elliot Colburn, 27

Constituency: Carshalton and Wallington, majority of 629.

Family: Brought up by working class parents in the area. After enduring homophobic abuse during the campaign, he delivered a smacker of a kiss on the lips of his partner Jed at the count.

Education: Local comprehensive and studied politics at Aberystwyth University. Knocked on his first door for the Tories aged 13.

Occupation: Public affairs officer for the NHS.

Fun fact: His partner edits a poultry magazine and they regularly take their own poultry to shows.

Joined miners’ strike

Lee Anderson, 52

Constituency: Ashfield, majority of 5,733. The second time the constituency has ever had a Tory MP.

Family: Son of a coal miner. His wife Sinead was subjected to abuse by hard-Left activists, despite undergoing a double lung transplant on the NHS.

Education. Attended the local state school.

Occupation: A miner for 12 years, he was a member of Arthur Scargill’s National Union of Mineworkers and went on strike in 1984. Later worked in homeless hostels before becoming office manager for the Labour MP Gloria De Piero. Frustrated with Labour’s Brexit stance, he quit last year and joined the Tories.

Fun fact: Caught staging a doorstep encounter while on the campaign trail with Michael Crick for Mail Plus.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson addresses newly-elected Conservative MPs at the Houses of Parliament today after winning his huge majority

Prime Minister Boris Johnson addresses newly-elected Conservative MPs at the Houses of Parliament today after winning his huge majority

Trained in army cadets

Antony Higginbotham, 30

Constituency: Burnley, majority of 1,352. First Tory MP in the town since 1910.

Family: Grandmother was a nurse and his mother was a trade union representative. Father held two jobs to try to make ends meet. Single and openly gay.

Education: Local state school and the first of his family to go to university. Studied politics at Hull.

Occupation: Worked in the NHS and then joined NatWest to help customers prepare for life after the EU.

Fun fact: Claims his political outlook was inspired by his time in Lancashire’s Army Cadet Force.

Father killed in a pub fight

Dehenna Davison, 26

Constituency: Bishop Auckland, majority of 7,962. First time seat has been represented by the Tories since it was created in 1885.

Family: Grew up on a council estate in Sheffield. Her father, a stone mason, was killed by a blow to the head in a pub fight when she was 13. She is separated from her husband John Fareham, who is 35 years her senior. They appeared last year in a Channel 4 documentary, Bride and Prejudice, about couples overcoming opposition from family and friends to their marriage.

Education: Privately educated at Sheffield High School after winning a scholarship. Studied politics at Hull University.

Occupation: Former computer game shop worker who spent a year working for Commons leader Jacob Rees-Mogg.

Fun fact: Has a tattoo of her dog mocked up as a Harry Potter character.

The dolphin trainer

Virginia Crosbie, 50

Constituency: Ynys Mon, majority of 1,968. First Tory in the constituency since 1979.

Family: Grandfather was a coal miner in Merthyr Tydfil. Mother worked in a jam factory in Essex. Married with three children.

Education: Colchester County High, a grammar school, becoming first person in her family to take A-levels. Studied microbiology at Queen Mary, University of London, and management at the University of Westminster.

Occupation: Worked for a pharmaceutical company before moving to HSBC. Retrained as a maths teacher working with young adults in north London.

Fun fact: Worked as a dolphin trainer at Woburn Safari Park with the presenter Terry Nutkins on the BBC’s Animal Magic show.

The ‘Blue Wall’ arrives at Parliament: Boris Johnson’s army of new Tory MPs begin their first day at the House of Commons as PM vows to ‘northernise’ government

An incredible 109 new Tory MPs have descended on Parliament today after the ‘blue tsunami’ of the election.

Triumphant Conservatives are reporting for duty in Westminster after demolishing Labour’s ‘Red Wall’ of Leave-backing strongholds in the North, Midlands and Wales.

Dehenna Davison, 26 – the first Tory ever to represent Bishop Auckland – tweeted a picture of herself with a backpack having been given her induction by Commons staff – joking that she was like Paddington Bear. 

Ms Davison previously featured on Channel 4’s Bride & Prejudice alongside 59-year-old Tory councillor John Fareham in 2018, in a bid to convince her grandfather they were a good match. 

Others MPs shared photos of their trips to the London, clearly excited to start fulfilling their promises to secure Brexit.

Many of the Tories who swept away decades of Labour dominance in traditional working class areas are in their 20s, and they were clearly enjoying the fruits of their success.  

The arrivals came as Boris Johnson looked to get his new government off to a flying start, with a mini-reshuffle to fill gaps in his senior team.

Allies have suggested he wants to ‘northernise’ the Cabinet as he seeks to cement his hold on working class areas that have put their ‘trust’ in him. 

Dehenna Davison - the first Tory ever to represent Bishop Auckland - tweeted a picture of herself with a backpack having been given her induction by Commons staff

Dehenna Davison – the first Tory ever to represent Bishop Auckland – tweeted a picture of herself with a backpack having been given her induction by Commons staff

New Welsh Tory MP Fay Jones posted a photograph of herself with colleagues Virginia Crosbie and Sarah Atherton today

New Welsh Tory MP Fay Jones posted a photograph of herself with colleagues Virginia Crosbie and Sarah Atherton today

Gary Sambrook travelled to London today from Birmingham Northfield after winning the seat held by Labour since 1992

Gary Sambrook travelled to London today from Birmingham Northfield after winning the seat held by Labour since 1992

Alicia Kearns, who succeeded Alan Duncan as MP for Rutland and Melton, has already been to Parliament

Alicia Kearns, who succeeded Alan Duncan as MP for Rutland and Melton, has already been to Parliament

Dehenna Davison, 26, who became Bishop Auckland's first Tory MP in the constituency's 134-year history, shared this photograph with her fellow new representatives from the north-east

Dehenna Davison, 26, who became Bishop Auckland’s first Tory MP in the constituency’s 134-year history, shared this photograph with her fellow new representatives from the north-east

The arrivals came as Boris Johnson (at Downing Street today) looked to get his new government off to a flying start, with a mini-reshuffle to fill gaps in his team

The arrivals came as Boris Johnson (at Downing Street today) looked to get his new government off to a flying start, with a mini-reshuffle to fill gaps in his team

Some of the new MPs even joined up with each other en route as they rode a train together from the north-east.

One photo was posted by Ms Davison – first Tory MP Bishop Auckland’s 134-year history – showed her alongside Matt Vickers, MP for Stockton South, Peter Gibson from Darlington, Paul Howell, MP for Sedgefield and Jacob Young for Redcar.

Each new MP was wearing a blue scarf as they made their way to Parliament.  

Mr Johnson will undertake a limited reshuffle this afternoon as he fills gaps in his Cabinet left by the departures of former culture secretary Nicky Morgan and former Welsh secretary Alun Cairns. 

But he will then turn his attention to making sure he is able to stick to his ‘get Brexit done’ mantra by laying the groundwork for MPs to vote on his EU accord on Friday – the day after the Queen’s Speech. 

Mr Johnson insisted during the election campaign that he wanted to make Brexit progress before Christmas and Downing Street has identified Friday as the day to make that happen. 

The plan is to re-introduce the Withdrawal Agreement Bill and then ask MPs to vote to give it a second reading with the rest of the legislative stages then taking place in January.

In order for the vote to take place Number 10’s proposed timetable will have to be signed off by new Commons Speaker Lindsay Hoyle who is expected to be installed when parliament returns tomorrow.  

However, the Tories are hopeful Mr Hoyle will back the plan so MPs can vote and then head home for a brief Christmas break before then finishing the passage of the bill next month ahead of the January 31 divorce deadline. 

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: ‘We plan to start the process before Christmas and will do so in the proper constitutional way in discussion with the Speaker.’ 

The PM met with key ministers and aides in Downing Street today as he got back to work after the Conservatives smashed Labour at the ballot box last week and won a 80-seat majority, making the passage of his Brexit deal a formality.

Speaking to reporters outside No10, Chancellor Sajid Javid said: ‘Welcome to the people’s government.’ 

Mr Johnson will welcome the new Tory MPs to Westminster this afternoon with a message that addressing voters’ concerns now could see the Tories win a record fifth term in 2024 – and rule throughout the 2020s. 

Today’s reshuffle is expected to be a small-scale affair before a much more radical shake-up in February which could see up to a third of existing ministers axed along with a major overhaul of the Whitehall machine.

Sajid Javid

Dominic Raab

Chancellor Sajid Javid (left) and Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab (right) were also reporting for duty in Whitehall this morning

Dehenna Davison (second right) gives a thumbs up alongside Paul Howell (left), Matt Vickers (second left), Jacob Young (centre) and Peter Gibson (right)

Dehenna Davison (second right) gives a thumbs up alongside Paul Howell (left), Matt Vickers (second left), Jacob Young (centre) and Peter Gibson (right)

Duncan Baker, the new MP for North Norfolk, has travelled down to London with Jerome Mayhew, MP for Broadland

Duncan Baker, the new MP for North Norfolk, has travelled down to London with Jerome Mayhew, MP for Broadland

Paul Bristow, another new Tory MP who won a seat from Labour, has already visited Parliament and learned where to hang his sword

Paul Bristow, another new Tory MP who won a seat from Labour, has already visited Parliament and learned where to hang his sword

Andy Carter is the new MP for Warrington South

Ruth Edwards has taken over from Ken Clarke as MP for Rushcliffe

Andy Carter (left), the new MP for Warrington South, and Ruth Edwards (right), who has taken over from Ken Clarke as MP for Rushcliffe, have already toured the Commons

Andrew Bowie, a returning MP, posted a video of himself outside Parliament as the election results were implemented

Andrew Bowie, a returning MP, posted a video of himself outside Parliament as the election results were implemented 

Ms Davison said: ‘#TeamTees are officially on our way to Parliament. Couldn’t be happier to be sharing my journey to Westminster with these four amazing lads.’

Other MPs said they had already been to the Commons to receive their instructions, with one saying he learned where to hang his sword.

Many of the new representatives tweeted #GetBrexitDone, Boris Johnson’s election slogan which clearly resonated with the electorate.

The MPs will now have no time to waste to fulfill the election promise as Mr Johnson looks to secure Brexit within the coming weeks thanks to his massively increased majority. 

Dehenna Davison made the headlines in 2015 with her marriage to 59-year-old John Fareham (pictured together)

Dehenna Davison made the headlines in 2015 with her marriage to 59-year-old John Fareham (pictured together)

Shaun Bailey, the new representative for West Bromwich West, is the first non-Labour MP to hold the seat

Shaun Bailey, the new representative for West Bromwich West, is the first non-Labour MP to hold the seat

Alexander Stafford won the Labour safe seat of Rother Valley which had been red since its creation in 1918

Alexander Stafford won the Labour safe seat of Rother Valley which had been red since its creation in 1918

Richard Holden is driving down to London after winning the seat of North West Durham, another constituency which has never previously been won by a Tory

Richard Holden is driving down to London after winning the seat of North West Durham, another constituency which has never previously been won by a Tory

Simon Jupp, the new MP for East Devon, tweeted that he has completed his induction in Parliament

Simon Jupp, the new MP for East Devon, tweeted that he has completed his induction in Parliament

Jane Stevenson who was elected in Wolverhampton North East, attended a Christingle service before heading to Westminster

Jane Stevenson who was elected in Wolverhampton North East, attended a Christingle service before heading to Westminster

Boris’s BABIES: New breed of 20-something Tory MPs includes tattooed video gamer whose dad was killed when she was 13, an ex-dolphin trainer and an NHS worker 

The new Tory MPs include a gang of 20-somethings nicknamed ‘Boris’s babies’ who stormed Labour’s traditional fiefdoms in the North and Midlands.

This new breed of Conservative is more working class than toff and will leave behind jobs in the NHS, schools and some more exotic professions such as training dolphins or running a microbrewery. 

Here are some of the Tories’ new faces in Parliament:

The poster girl for Boris Johnson’s election campaign and friend of Carrie Symonds whose father was killed by a single punch in a pub when she was just 13

Dehenna Davison was just 13 when she learned her father Dominic had been killed by a single blow to the head in the pub and is now a Tory MP in Bishop Auckland

Dehenna Davison was just 13 when she learned her father Dominic had been killed by a single blow to the head in the pub and is now a Tory MP in Bishop Auckland

On the campaign trail: Dehenna Davison, right, with Boris Johnson¿s partner Carrie Symonds

On the campaign trail: Dehenna Davison, right, with Boris Johnson’s partner Carrie Symonds

Dehenna Davison was just a young teenager when she learned her father Dominic had been killed by a single blow to the head in the pub.

Ms Davison, a Tory winner last night in a Co Durham seat which has never elected a Conservative MP, recalled how she sat in a hospital waiting room as doctors battled for 45 minutes to save her father’s life.

‘I can still picture it. I can tell you what the colour the walls were and everything,’ she said. ‘They [the doctors] stopped and I went to see my dad’s body, which is not something you expect to do at such a young age.’

The Sheffield-born 26-year-old beat Labour Remainer Helen Goodman. 

She studied politics at Hull University and spent a year as an aide to Jacob Rees-Mogg. 

Ms Davison made the headlines when she appeared on Channel 4’s Bride & Prejudice alongside 59-year-old Tory councillor John Fareham in 2018, in a bid to convince her grandfather they were a good match.

She received support on the campaign trail from Mr Johnson’s girlfriend Carrie Symonds, said politics was about helping people ‘get their benefits claim through, getting a pothole filled’.

The former computer game shop worker admitted the ‘poster girl thing’ was probably due to her tragic backstory and her ‘slightly unusual demographics’. But she added: ‘I just want to get stuff done.’

Carrie Symonds tweeted her congratulations after her victory, saying she was thrilled to hear her friend had become the first Conservative MP for Bishop Auckland.  ‘She will be fantastic,’ she wrote. 

Graduate who seized Tom Watson’s old West Bromwich East seat  

Nicola Richards now represents West Bromwich East, a former fortress for Tom Watson

Nicola Richards now represents West Bromwich East, a former fortress for Tom Watson

Nicola Richards has become one of the youngest MPs in Parliament after shocking Labour in the seat of its deputy leader.

The 24-year old now represents West Bromwich East, a former fortress for Tom Watson.

Mr Watson stood down at the election, but Labour had been widely expected to hang on to the constituency.

 Ms Richards, who won by 1,593 votes, graduated from Birmingham University and was previously a councillor in Dudley and a caseworker for a Tory MP.  

Tory candidate aged 24 who took seat last held by the Tories in 1987

Conservative candidate Sara Britcliffe gained the constituency of Hyndburn from from Labour’s Graham Jones with a majority of almost 3,000 at the age of 24. 

Conservative activists sang ‘I’m dreaming of blue Christmas’ as they celebrated the result.

Ms Britcliffe’s father, Peter Britcliffe, was a long-serving Tory councillor in Accrington until he stood down in 2018.

Mr Jones had held the seat since 2010, and the seat was last won by a Tory in 1987.

Speaking before the result was announced, Ms Britcliffe said: ‘What I found on the doorstep are people are fed up with the situation we have been in for three years, which you can completely understand.

‘People want to get Brexit done and it has shown in the polls that it wasn’t just the Conservative Party saying that, it’s what everybody was feeling.

‘I think we have worked very hard on the campaign and I think the message has got across that Hyndburn is ready for something different and someone who listens to the constituents.

‘Not matter how people voted at this election, I will work for everybody.’

Daughter of Indian immigrants who came to work in the NHS 

Claire Coutinho, 34, lives in her now East Surrey constituency with her partner Julian, 32, having met working in the world of finance. 

The daughter of two Indian doctors who came to Britain with £100 in the 1970s, spent two years working for the Treasury after a career in the City.

She said before the election: ‘My perfect weekend would be wandering round a food market, going for a walk in the hills and watching a good crime documentary’. 

But she decided to stand as an MP after backing Leave in the 2016 EU referendum. 

Ms Coutinho said she was ‘so delighted’ and ‘absolutely honoured’ at winning the seat previously held by Sam Gyimah, who defected to the Lib Dems. 

She said: My parents, Maria and Winston, thought Britain would give them a better life, and that if you work hard you will be rewarded. I wasn’t one of those children who dreamt of becoming an MP. I started out in banking, working on a trading floor where there were just eight women out of 200 people’. 

Chemical factory worker bent on delivering Brexit

Jacob Young, 26, is a Brexit-loving chemical engineer who beat Labour in their own backyard.  

The aptly-named factory worker won the North Yorkshire seat of Redcar for the first time since it was created in 1974.

Tory candidate Jacob Young polled 18,811 votes, beating Labour’s Anna Turley into second place with 15,289.

Mr Young, aged just 26, increased the Tory vote share by 12.9 percentage points. Ms Turley had held Mo Mowlam’s old seat since 2015.  

NHS worker off to London on Monday to help Boris take Britain out of the EU 

Mental health support worker Ian Levy shocked his Tory bosses after winning a north-east seat from Labour.

In his victory speech, the new Tory MP for Blyth Valley Ian Levy said: ‘I would like to thank Boris because I’m going to be on that train on Monday, I’m going to London. We’re going to get Brexit done.’ 

He is the first to win the sear for the Conservatives since 1935. 

Michael Gove also admitted that he was ‘surprised’ the Conservatives won Blyth Valley.

Mr Gove said he was ‘delighted’ for Ian Levy, a mental health worker and the new Tory MP for the constituency. ‘But I’ll be honest, I didn’t necessarily expect that we would win that seat.’

Micro brewery manager who gave up making booze to win Wrexham for the Tories

Sarah Atherton was among the first-ever female Conservative MPs elected in Wales last night. 

The former nurse and social worker ran her own microbrewery in Wrexham before bidding to be MP.

But she was celebrating to be the very first woman MP in Wales by winning the traditional socialist seat from Labour. She won her seat with a majority of 2,131.

Sarah – filling the seat vacated by Labour’s Ian Lucas – said she was ‘delighted and privileged’ to be the first Welsh female Conservative MP.

‘The people of Wrexham wanted Brexit done and delivered. I think that’s why we have got a majority of 2,000 tonight,’ she said.

Former dolphin trainer chosen by Tory HQ just a DAY before nominations closed 

Virginia Crosbie was a last minute choice of candidate having been chosen less than 24 hours before nominations closed – and won the Ynys Mon seat on the isle of Anglesey.

She is from Essex but has promised to make her home in Ynys Mon if elected.

A former Maths teacher and dolphin trainer, Crosbie has been prominent in ‘Women to Win’, a Tory group set up under Theresa May to try to get more Conservative MPs into parliament.

She won her seat with a majority of 1,968 from Labour.

Virginia said: ‘It’s a real privilege to represent this beautiful constituency and community, the people have really welcomed myself and my family and I’m really honoured.’

Marathon and triathlon addict who is daughter of a former Tory MP

Fay Jones won the Brecon and Radnor seat from the Liberal Democrats with a majority of 7,131.

Fay has worked as an assistant to an MEP in Brussels and as a researcher for the Prince of Wales.

She is the daughter of Gwilym Jones, who was Conservative MP for Cardiff North between 1983 – 1997 and served as a Welsh Office minister.

Fay said: ‘I am over the moon. It’s hard to describe but basically, thrilled and completely delighted.’

‘It’s beyond our wildest expectations the majority we’ve ended up with. I think it’s that cut through that people want us to get Brexit done and they heard the message that Boris Johnson is about which is getting on with it.’

She said the reality of becoming MP is yet to hit her fully.

‘It’s incredibly exciting and a very, very, nice problem to have. I want to live up to expectations.’

It comes after a by-election in August, which Lib Dem Jane Dodds won, taking the seat from Conservative MP Chris Davies who had been convicted of a criminal offence after falsifying his expenses.

Estranged wife of sexting Tory MP who stood in his seat without telling him first 

Andrew Griffiths, 49, threw his support behind his estranged wife Kate, 48, - whose back he went behind when sexting the much younger women last year -

Andrew Griffiths, 49, threw his support behind his estranged wife Kate, 48, – whose back he went behind when sexting the much younger women last year – but she refused his support

Kate Griffiths was selected as the Conservative candidate for Burton in Staffordshire following her husband Andrew’s decision to stand down from politics.

He said he was backing his wife – but Mrs Griffiths said she was divorcing her husband and suggested she had suffered from domestic abuse.

She said she left him following newspaper stories he had bombarded two women with thousands of sexual messages, weeks after the birth of the couple’s first child. 

She said: ‘I want to make it clear that I have not sought, nor do I accept, Andrew’s offer of political support.’ 

Mrs Griffiths, 48, said her husband did not know in advance that she would be standing in his former seat.

Tory teacher and union rep who won Labour seat by promising to ‘work his bum off’ !

Jonathan Gullis is the new Conservative MP for Stoke-on-Trent North.

He works as a teacher at a secondary school in Birmingham and is even his school’s trade union representative for the NASUWT, usually the preserve of more left-wing staff.

Mr Gullis, who joined the party in his teens, was back at his West Midlands school for work on the morning of his election win. 

He said: ‘I’m absolutely over the moon to even have had the shot for Stoke-on-Trent North, from a young age all I’ve wanted to do is make a difference in people’s lives.

‘That’s why I became a teacher, and the reason I want to be an MP is to do it on a much larger scale. I know I’ve set myself a very big challenge, a lot of people have lent me their vote from the Labour Party. 

‘My dad failed school and went back to that school to be a cleaner and did night school, he ended up working hard to get himself a masters from Durham.

‘My mum was off a council estate in London and got herself into a grammar school. I’m not saying we have had the hardest life in the world, I have certainly had many more advantages than many other people’.

 



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Boris Johnson takes victory lap of newly won north of England seats – Channel 4 News


Boris Johnson has promised former Labour voters he will ‘repay’ their trust as he visited the northeast of England to congratulate newly elected Tory MPs. He declared he wanted to spread opportunity to everyone.

Meanwhile Jeremy Corbyn has faced more fury from former Labour MPs who lost their seats, claiming he had ‘failed as a communicator’ and warning that if the party didn’t sort itself out, it could spell the end of the Labour movement altogether.



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Boris Johnson sees ‘wonderful adventure’ after Brexit. But Scotland and Northern Ireland brace for a bumpier ride.



The constituency was once held by a former Labour prime minister, the centrist and close Bill Clinton ally, Tony Blair. It swung behind the Conservatives big time in Thursday’s general election — whose outcome handed Johnson a clear path to steer Britain out of the European Union.

Yet even as Johnson leaned forward with promises of good times to come, many are wondering which of the United Kingdom’s four parts — England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland — Johnson was appealing to.

Scotland on Thursday overwhelmingly voted for a nationalist party that wants its own breakaway plan: secede from the United Kingdom and stay in the European Union.

In Northern Ireland, for the first time in its history, the region elected more nationalist lawmakers, who support unification with the Republic of Ireland, than unionists, who emphatically demand to remain a part of Britain.

Ever since England and Wales voted in 2016 to leave the European Union, while Scotland and Northern Ireland did the exact opposite, the sides have worried or wondered when the union might crack up over Brexit.

The next few years may tell us.

In England, Johnson’s Conservatives won new seats across the opposition Labour Party’s former working-class heartlands, giving his party its largest parliamentary majority since Margaret Thatcher in 1987.

Johnson acknowledged that the former Labour supporters who backed him were tentative, still skeptical crossovers. Yes, they swiped Tory-curious — but they were not true believers ready to back the traditional Conservative doctrine of lower taxes, less government, fewer services, and more free-market capitalism.

Instead, these former Labour-leaners were driven to vote for Johnson over their frustration that the Brexit they had voted for in June 2016 was not delivered.

“I can imagine people’s pencils hovering over the ballot paper and wavering, before coming down for us and the Conservatives,” Johnson said in Sedgefield.

“And I know that people may have been breaking the voting habits of generations to vote for us, and I want the people of the northeast to know that we in the Conservative Party, and I, will repay your trust,” the prime minister said.

In Scotland, the task of healing is arguably greater. The first time Johnson was there as prime minister in July, he was booed.

On Friday, Johnson spoke to Nicola Sturgeon, the first minister of Scotland, and rejected her calls for a second referendum on Scottish independence, which she says she now has a mandate for, following her own party’s triumph this past week. (In 2014, Scottish voters solidly turned down an independence question.)

The Scottish National Party, which wants Scotland to break free, nearly swept the board in Scotland, winning more than 80 percent of the seats, higher than even optimistic predictions.

But the Scottish government can’t unilaterally call an independence referendum — they need the support of Parliament. And Westminster, now controlled by Johnson’s Conservatives, does not appear in the mood for another divisive referendum.

Next week, Sturgeon said, she will publish her case to transfer powers from Westminster, so that Scotland can hold a referendum. Johnson has made it clear he will reject the request, setting up a battle to come. Given the Conservative landslide, the battle could rage for many years to come.

“It would take massive and sustained protests — think Hong Kong — to be able to get Westminster government to change its position on this,” said Thomas Lundberg, a lecturer in politics at the University of Glasgow.

Johnson’s cunning, clever campaign that successfully united the pro-Brexit vote in Wales and England — and created an existential crisis for the Labour Party and Liberal Democrats — swept him into office with a mandate to “get Brexit done.”

For the past three years, British politics has been dominated by Brexit, which Britons voted in favor of 52 percent to 48 percent in June 2016.

Johnson is keen to push the Brexit process to the next phase. Starting Monday, Johnson is expected to announce his new leadership team, and then Queen Elizabeth II will formally open Parliament on Thursday.

Johnson wants to hold a vote on his Brexit withdrawal agreement before Christmas. If it passes and then is ratified by the European Parliament, Britain will leave the European Union in January, entering a year-long transition period.

When he was asked whether the dreams of those who want to remain in the European Union were over, Michael Heseltine, a former Conservative deputy prime minister and a prominent pro-European, said that the debate was over.

“We have lost. Let’s not muck about with the language,” he told the BBC on Saturday. “Brexit is going to happen and we have to live with it.”

Heseltine said that it could be 20 years or more before the issue of rejoining the European Union is raised again, but he added: “You can’t escape the devastating results on Scotland and Northern Ireland, so the agenda is not going away.”

The divisions that existed last week have not disappeared overnight. Hundreds of protesters descended on the prime minister’s official residence at 10 Downing Street on Friday night, some waving E.U. flags and others carrying placards that read “Defy Tory Rule” and “No to Racism.”

Johnson’s Conservative Party won 44 percent of the vote share. In Britain’s first-past-the-post system, that is enough for a thumping victory. But an autopsy of the results also suggests challenges that lie ahead.

“Boris has won his gamble in England definitely and also in Wales, but the price is that you exacerbate divisions and you create a state crisis. The whole future, the territorial integrity of the state, is clearly in question in Scotland in Northern Ireland,” said Richard Wyn Jones, a politics expert at Cardiff University.

Johnson is fond of calling the four territories of the union the “awesome foursome.” But unionists in Northern Ireland say that Johnson’s “oven ready” Brexit deal will leave Northern Ireland in the E.U.’s economic space, which they say changes the terms of the union for Northern Ireland.

In Scotland, meanwhile, Johnson’s elite, old Etonian schoolboy persona goes down poorly. Sturgeon’s SNP has called him a “recruiting tool” for their cause. Polls in Scotland show that an uptick in support for independence over the past year have come largely from those wanting to remain in the European Union.

Sturgeon on Friday acknowledged that the election results do not mean that all those who voted for the party “necessarily support independence, but there has been a strong endorsement in this election over Scotland having a choice over our future.”



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Brexit-Backing Billionaire Gains $300 Million After Johnson Win


(Bloomberg) — Champagne was flowing in London’s Mayfair as the news hit.

Boris Johnson’s Conservatives weren’t just winning, they were trouncing Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour across the U.K., including working-class Northern towns far removed from the West End.

Michael Spencer, founder of interdealer broker Icap and longtime Tory donor, threw a celebration at Scott’s, an upscale seafood restaurant in London, according to a person familiar with the matter. About 200 guests toasted Johnson’s triumph.

The result was a “crushing national repudiation of the dangerous and divisive neo-Marxist policies” embraced by Labour’s leadership, Spencer said in a statement.

Spencer and his peers had plenty to celebrate. Corbyn consistently attacked the ultra-wealthy during the campaign, as well as pushing for nationalization of utilities, higher taxes and another referendum on a deal to leave the European Union.

Peter Hargreaves, one of the biggest supporters of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union, said he was relieved by Johnson’s victory. He blamed Labour’s dismal showing on Corbyn’s lack of appeal even in the northern heartlands.

“I was in contact with lots of friends in the North and they were quite surprised how many Labour voters weren’t going to vote for Corbyn. They were petrified of Corbyn.”

The Lancashire-born billionaire had another reason to be cheerful. He owns about a third of online investment platform Hargreaves Lansdown Plc, whose shares rose 2.4% on Friday, boosting the value of his fortune by $200 million to $4.5 billion.

His wealthy peers also had a bumper day. In total, the 16 Brits on the Bloomberg Billionaires Index — including Jim Ratcliffe and James Dyson — added about $2 billion to their combined net worth.

“I don’t need to celebrate — I’m just very, very happy with the result,” said John Caudwell, who founded Phones 4U, the mobile-phone retailer. “If Labour had got a majority or there was a hung parliament, which wasn’t impossible, I would have been devastated. Far from celebrating, I would probably have been in a corner somewhere sobbing.”

That’s exactly what some Corbyn fans were doing across town.

The mood was grim at the Three Compasses, a pub in Hackney where Labour supporters, mostly in their 20s and 30s, waited for the results with beer and burgers. There was a collective groan when it came and party veterans were ashen-faced.

“I’m devastated,” said Penny Wrout, a Labour member of Hackney Council. “I’m very fearful because this is the most right-wing Conservative Party that I’ve known in my lifetime and I lived through Thatcher. It’s a catastrophe.”

That sentiment is rare within financial circles. Many had come to believe a Corbyn victory would do even more damage to the British economy than a hard Brexit with no transition deal.

“Business in general will really appreciate the clarity,” said Jeremy Isaacs, financier and founding partner of private equity firm JRJ Group. “Markets should react positively that the Corbyn risk is gone and we should see foreign direct investment flowing into the country.”

While Hargreaves had said he would stay in the U.K. no matter the result, many wealthy families based in Britain had made plans to relocate to more tax-friendly regimes such as Monaco or Switzerland if Corbyn came to power. Now those plans are instantly gone, says John Elder, a founding partner of Family Office Advisors LLP, a London-based firm that provides advice to wealthy families. Instead, he expects family offices will look for bargains in myriad asset classes in the U.K., from property to stakes in companies.

“There is political stability and clarity,” Elder said. “The U.K. is now an undervalued country to invest in for at least the next five years.”

Read more: U.K. Plc Cheers Johnson Election Win, But Brexit Still Looms

The London property market in particular could see a boost, according to Liam Bailey, global head of research at Knight Frank.

“It will release a lot of pent up demand in the market,” he said. “One group that may want to move on with things quite quickly are overseas buyers. With the pound rising they’ll experience an erosion of their buying power, which may well encourage transactions,” although he cautioned that Brexit would still hover above the market.

It isn’t just foreign capital that might flow back into the British property market. Mark Stephen, the founder and managing director of Reditum Capital, a London-based real estate investment firm, said a major domestic pension fund is poised to place 50 million pounds to 100 million pounds ($134 million) to work in his fund now that Johnson and the Tories have won control of Parliament.

Reditum plans to invest the fund in land earmarked for new housing developments north of London and in Newcastle. “They premised the investment on the result going the way it did, so hopefully we can wrap that up in the next year,” Stephen said.

Boris and Brexit

Others money managers were more circumspect.

Ever since the Brexit referendum was passed in June 2016, Seven Investment Management LLP, an investment firm in London with 13 billion pounds in assets, had been weaning its portfolios of U.K. stocks and looking abroad to fill the gap. Now its portfolio managers will take a serious look at ramping up British equities, said Ben Kumar, an investment strategist with the firm.

But he’s telling clients he remains cautious because after Brexit no one knows whether Johnson will succeed in negotiating new free trade agreements with Brussels by December, and another with Washington.

“The problem with Boris is that he doesn’t care what he’s promised before, deadlines just go flying by, so will he get it done by December?” Kumar said. “The point is, uncertainty hasn’t gone away.”

As well as Brexit, Johnson has to deliver on his promises to “unleash the potential” of the economy.

The government will have to commit significant resources to bolster the National Health Service, schools and other infrastructure, said Amanda Staveley, founder of PCP Capital Partners. These are issues more commonly associated with Labour but that shouldn’t stop Johnson from embracing them, she said.

“The country has entrusted him with this astonishing vote, and you’ve got to make sure the whole system works,” Staveley said.

Hargreaves is focusing on how the next stage of Brexit negotiations proceed now that Johnson has the biggest Tory majority since 1987, when Margaret Thatcher was prime minister.

“It’s like a game of poker,” he said. “You have a hand that you’ve got to play well.”

Still, the prevailing expectation was that the new government’s mandate would restore some zip to an economy that’s largely been in a holding pattern since the U.K. voted to leave the EU in 2016.

Mobile-phone billionaire Caudwell said now is the moment to make some big bets on the economy as a whole.

“There has definitely been a reluctance on my part to press buttons to further investments,” he said. “Now I can go full steam ahead.”

(Updates with Amanda Staveley comment in 27th paragraph)

–With assistance from Ambereen Choudhury, Nishant Kumar and Thomas Buckley.

To contact the reporters on this story: Tom Metcalf in London at [email protected];Edward Robinson in London at [email protected];Ben Stupples in London at [email protected];Viren Vaghela in London at [email protected]

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Pierre Paulden at [email protected], Steven Crabill

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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How many seats for a majority? Boris Johnson wins election landslide



Boris Johnson is set to win a landslide Tory majority of 86 in the House of Commons, according to an exit poll for the general election.

The poll, conducted by Ipsos Mori for the BBC, ITV and Sky News, suggested the Conservatives would win 368 seats, with Labour on 191 and the SNP on 55.

If the forecast is correct, the Prime Minister will return to power with a commanding mandate enabling him to drive through his Brexit deal.

​It would represent the largest majority for a Tory leader since Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s, as well as Labour’s heaviest defeat since 1935.

How many seats are needed for a majority?

There are a total of 650 seats in the House of Commons, so a party needs to win 326 seats in order to command a majority and have a realistic chance of getting its laws through parliament.

However, when the speaker is removed from this number, and the Irish republican party Sinn Fein who do not take their seats, the number is slightly altered.

For example, including the speaker and the seven seats won by Sinn Fein in 2017, a majority could be achieved in that parliament with 322 seats.

The 2010 and 2017 elections both ended in hung parliaments, underscoring deep political divisions in the country.

Mr Johnson entered this election without just 298 Tory MPs, after some quit the party and he withdrew the whip from others when they rebelled over Brexit.

The result will be seen as a triumph for his tightly controlled election campaign, which was largely gaffe-free until the final week.

It will, however, be a significant set-back for the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, who will have twice led his party to defeat at the polls.

Additional reporting by PA



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UK election: Johnson pledges to put limits on unskilled migration | UK News


British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has refused to say whether he would resign if he fails to win a majority in Thursday’s general election.

In a TV interview, Johnson also insisted he wants to cut back on the European Union immigration.

Al Jazeera’s Catherine Stancl reports from London.





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BBC TV debate: Who won the TV debate tonight? Boris Johnson vs Jeremy Corbyn | Politics | News


The difference between results is similar to a preliminary survey which asked people who they thought would win, with 33 percent in favour of Boris Johnson and 28 percent in favour of Jeremy Corbyn.

The latest debate comes as another win for Boris Johnson, who according to more data from YouGov has had a consistently slim lead in television debating. 

In November, when the leaders had their first debate on ITV, YouGov asked people who they believed performed best on television. 

Their snap analysis of 1,646 people found 51 percent believed Boris Johnson performed best, while 49 percent favoured Jeremy Corbyn. 



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Boris Johnson, Jeremy Corbyn trade blame for London Bridge knife attacker’s release



Khan, who was freed on parole 11 months ago with an electronic tracking device on his ankle, began his attack Friday afternoon as he was entering a conference intended to rehabilitate violent offenders and terrorists. He stabbed at least five people before he was tackled by members of the public and shot dead by police. The queen honored the bystanders who intervened as heroes.

Police on Sunday named the second victim of Khan’s attack: Saskia Jones, 23, a volunteer with the Cambridge University program that hosted the conference in London. Police had earlier named Jack Merritt, 25, who worked for the program. Three other victims were in the hospital recovering from their wounds.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, appearing on a BBC political affairs show, said “the reason this killer was out on the streets was because of automatic early release, which was brought in by a lefty government.” He was referring to the government of former Labour prime minister Gordon Brown, which ended in 2010.

Host Andrew Marr repeatedly challenged Johnson, reminding his guest — and viewers — that Johnson’s Conservative Party has been in power for nearly 10 years.

Johnson refused to concede any responsibility. Whatever the Tories failed to do in the past, his government will fix it if he wins a majority in the Dec. 12 elections, he said.

“I think it is ridiculous, I think it is repulsive, that individuals as dangerous as this man should be allowed out after serving only eight years, and that’s why we are going to change the law,” Johnson vowed.

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn, Johnson’s principal opponent in the elections, called the government’s early release of Khan “a complete disaster” and called for a “very full investigation.”

In a speech in York on Sunday, Corbyn took aim at the cuts to police forces since the Conservatives came into power — a deficit of some 20,000 officers compared to years before.

“A failure to recruit has left huge staffing shortfalls and staff supervising more cases than ever expected, posing again a serious risk to our security,” Corbyn said. “You can’t keep people safe on the cheap.”

Into this febrile mix, President Trump is scheduled to arrive for a meeting of NATO leaders on Tuesday and Wednesday. Trump in the past has found it irresistible to wade into British electoral politics, and all sides expect him to do so again.

As Johnson, a Trump ally, was swatting back blame, the Justice Ministry revealed that 74 people convicted of terrorist offenses are living under supervision in British society.

The Sunday Times reported that Khan “had been granted permission by his parole officer to travel to London even though he was one of 3,000 extremists” on the MI5 “watch list.” The MI5 is Britain’s domestic intelligence service.

Ian Acheson, a former top counterterrorism official, wrote that he had warned Conservative officials for years that they were treating released terrorists with “jaw-dropping” naivete.

Corbyn, who has long spoken out against military action, said Britain’s foreign interventions have fueled conflict and brought terrorism to Britain.

He told supporters he had warned against the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and “we are still living with the consequences today.”

“The war on terror has manifestly failed,” Corbyn said. “Britain’s repeated military interventions in North Africa and the wider Middle East, including Afghanistan, have exacerbated rather than resolved the problems.”

Johnson has often accused Corbyn of siding with militant groups, such as Hamas and Hezbollah.

Opinion surveys of voting intent for the coming election have consistently shown Johnson’s Conservatives with a solid lead and clear path to majority government. But pollsters warn the electorate is still making up its mind — divided not only over parties and ideologies but Brexit — and they note that former prime minister Theresa May squandered her 20-point lead in days in the 2017 election.

Jo Swinson, the leader of the Liberal Democrats, accused Johnson of “politicizing” the terrorist attack, of turning it into a “distasteful” election issue.

Johnson said he would seek much tougher sentences for convicted terrorists.

“The suggestion that there’s some immediate law change, that you can do this with some tough rhetoric and, as he has done, link majority government to success in tackling terror, I just think it leaves a nasty taste in the mouth,” Swinson told the BBC.

Khan killed two of the very people who were tasked with helping him and other prisoners return to society as peaceful, productive citizens. Jones and Merritt were Cambridge graduates.

“What should have been a joyous opportunity to celebrate the achievements of this unique and socially transformative programme, hosted by our Institute of Criminology, was instead disrupted by an unspeakable criminal act,” university Vice Chancellor Stephen Toope said in a statement.

David Merritt, Jack’s father, described his son as a “beautiful spirit” who “always took the side of the underdog.”

He said his son would “not wish his death to be used as the pretext for more draconian sentences or for detaining people unnecessarily.”

Shami Chakrabarti, a top member of the Labour Party and an attorney, told the BBC, “I’m not prepared to say that any political party could have prevented what happened on Friday.”

Karla Adam contributed to this report.



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General elections 2019: Boris Johnson will become Donald Trump’s ‘poodle’ if he wins, warns Chuka Umunna



Boris Johnson will become Donald Trump’s “poodle” if the Tories win the election and take the UK out of the EU, Chuka Umunna will warn.

In a speech on Monday, the Liberal Democrats spokesman on foreign affairs is expected to say that Mr Johnson will become more reliant on the US president if the Tories return to power next month.

Mr Umunna’s party is committing to spending extra money on defence and aid, claiming that the defence budget will be almost £1 billion more in 2024-25 under the Lib Dems than under the Tories.

The Lib Dems will commit to spending 2 per cent of GDP on defence, and will also maintain the current commitment to spend 0.7 per cent of GDP on International Aid.

Mr Umunna said Mr Johnson will become Mr Trump’s ‘poodle’ (AP)

The party said that thanks to the economic boost which they say will result from staying in the EU, this will mean they will outspend the Tories by £340 million in 2024-25.

In his speech in Watford, Mr Umunna is expected to say: “Not only will we cease to be that important bridge between the EU and the US but by withdrawing from the European Union, inevitably Johnson will become more reliant on Trump in the short term if he is re-elected.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson as they meet at the United Nations (REUTERS)

“Johnson is desperate to secure a US trade deal to make up for the damage done to our global standing if Brexit happens.

“From my own contacts with the US Government, it is clear a high price will be demanded and close alignment with US rules and regulation demanded – we risk becoming a vassal state of the US if Boris Johnson gets a majority.

“Leave the EU and the UK under Johnson will become President Trump’s poodle. That is what is at stake at this election.”

Mr Umunna is expected to say Mr Johnson is “following the Trump playbook” and has become part of “this global network of populist, right wing, authoritarian nationalists”.

He will add: “Giving Johnson a majority is to give carte blanche to this type of politics in the UK – something which should worry us all.”



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