Posted on

Miguel Angel Lopez hits out to claim Tour de France stage as Primoz Roglic tightens grip on yellow



Once beyond the intermediate sprint, I wouldn’t be surprised if a breakaway clipped off after the heavier fastmen eased up, before the stage really lights up. Pierre Rolland (B&B Hotels-Vital Concept) will be keen non adding some more points to his account in the mountains classification, but does he have the legs to take him all the way to the final climb? The 33-year-old has been very lively over the past few stages, and is not quite at the level of the real big hitters, and so I think once Rolland goes over the col de la Madeleine, his day will most likely be done.

Don’t be surprised if EF Pro Cycling put two or three riders — Hugh Carthy, Daniel Martínez and Neilson Powless — in the break, while Mitchelton-Scott may fancy their chances with Esteban Chaves or Mikel Nieve. Ineos Grenadiers, surely, will also get involved? That said, there will be an awful lot of other that will ‘ fancy their chances’, but will they be able to get into the breakaway should one form and if so, will the have the legs to finish it of on the final climb of the day?

So, will today’s stage be won by a breakaway rider? If so they will need a decent lead by the time it reaches the bottom of the final climb of the day. The final kilometres of the col de la Loze will be contested on what has been described as a cycle path and so it is very narrow, meaning positioning will be absolutely key. Get stuck behind somebody who has a mechanical or a crash and that’s it, your Tour de France hopes could be over. Also, the gradients are insanely steep. Very un-Tour de France like, with pitches reaching 24% in places and long stretches at over 11% this really is terrain for those with an explosive edge. Someone like Tadej Pogacar (UAE Team Emirates). Anyway, enough of this idle speculation, racing starts in 10 minutes.





Source link

Posted on

France expecting intensive care spike in quarantine blow as Glasgow KFC forced to shut


FRANCE are facing another blow in their bid to become Covid-safe as their intensive care units expect a spike in cases.

They have been on the UK’s quarantine list since last month, and this will not be happy news for British holidaymakers.

Meanwhile, Glasgow have had to shut a KFC branch in the Scottish city after six members of staff tested positive for coronavirus – with the store now closed for two weeks as employees self-isolate.

And, Leeds could have new lockdown measures introduced following a spike in cases throughout the city.

Councillors have warned people in the city must make a “collective effort” to avoid being plunged back into a local lockdown.

The UK death toll increased by 13 yesterday to a total 41,537, and cases hit 342,351.

Follow our coronavirus live blog for all the latest news and updates…





Source link

Posted on

France Covid-19: Paris compulsory face-mask rule comes into force


A woman wearing a protective face mask leaves after her swab samples are taken by volunteering firefighters at a test station for Covid-19 coronavirus in Marseille, France,Image copyright
EPA

Image caption

Masks were made compulsory in Marseille and Paris is now likely to have the same rule

Wearing a face-mask in public has become mandatory across Paris and several surrounding areas, amid a surge in Covid-19 cases in France.

The move comes a day after the country recorded 6,111 new infections – its highest number since early May.

The number of “red zones” where the virus is in active circulation has risen from two to 21.

Announcing new local curbs on Thursday, PM Jean Castex said he wanted to avoid another general lockdown.

He said the coronavirus was “gaining ground” across France, and that if the government did not act fast infection growth could become “exponential”.

Despite a sharp rise in cases in recent weeks, daily death tolls have remained low. Overall, more than 30,500 people have died and almost 300,000 have been infected in France.

A number of European countries are seeing a surge in new cases, and Germany is also planning tighter rules.

Chancellor Angela Merkel warned on Friday that in the coming months things would become “even more difficult than now”, as people have been able to enjoy life outdoors over the summer.

Masks for Paris

The French prime minister said all pedestrians would have to wear face masks in public areas in the capital from 08:00 on Friday (06:00 GMT).

While individual streets and areas of the capital already have rules on wearing face-coverings, this new rule will be far more extensive, covering not only Paris but its inner ring of Seine-Saint-Denis, Hauts-de-Seine and Val-de-Marne.

Last-minute reprieve for cyclists and joggers

Mask-wearing has taken over the streets of Paris by stealth over the past few months, and the blanket enforcement of face-masks in and around the capital from 08:00 triggered little real outcry, except for one thing: the new rules were originally designed to apply to cyclists and runners, along with pedestrians.

By the time the regulation came into force this morning, Paris city hall had intervened, and won a reprieve, saying it was “dangerous” and “counterproductive” to force these two groups to wear masks, especially when the mayor has been encouraging people to cycle to work to relieve pressure on public transport.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

While cyclists have been given a reprieve, the rules still stand for motorcyclists and people on scooters

Runners and cyclists aside, only a handful of people were still out without a mask in my neighbourhood this morning, and there seems to be a lot of support for the measure around the capital.

“It’s better than being locked down,” one woman said. Another resident said the government should have brought it in earlier, so that “the situation wouldn’t have got as bad as it is now”.

Paris is already a red zone, along with the southern area of Bouches-du-Rhône, where France’s second-largest city Marseille made masks compulsory from Wednesday evening.

A broad expanse of the Mediterranean coast and the Gironde area around Bordeaux are also red zones.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionHow not to wear a face mask

Masks will also become part of normal life for French schoolchildren aged 11 and over. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended use of masks in school from the age of 12.

Masks are already required in most enclosed public spaces and will be mandatory in workplaces from next week.

However, the two biggest cities in the Netherlands have decided to scrap a pilot scheme for compulsory masks in their busiest areas on Monday.

The Amsterdam and Rotterdam authorities say they may bring back the requirement if necessary, but they believe that as the warm weather and high tourist season come to an end it will be easier to maintain social distancing of 1.5m (5ft).

What has Germany decided?

Masks are a key part of Germany’s tougher restrictions aimed at curbing a renewed rise in cases.

Although Germany has not seen the scale of Covid-related deaths as many other Western European countries, the federal government and 16 states have reached a deal on new measures:

  • A minimum €50 (£45) fine will be slapped on anyone breaking rules on face-coverings – in shops, public transport or elsewhere; Lower Saxony in the north-west will not impose fines but Bavaria in the south will set higher penalties
  • Big events will be banned until the end of the year, although regions will be exempt if they have a low infection rate and participants are limited to those areas
  • A working group will be set up to discuss Bundesliga football matches, but no spectators will be allowed in until at least the end of October
  • There will be an end to free tests for holidaymakers returning from high-risk countries after 15 September. Travellers already have to self-isolate for 14 days. Bavaria will continue free testing until 1 October.

During her summer press conference on Friday, Mrs Merkel said Germans would “have to live with this virus for longer” and maintain vigilance, especially as the number of infections had risen in recent weeks. Another 1,571 cases and three more deaths were reported on Friday.

  • Germany extends coronavirus pay top-up scheme
  • Germany puts on crowded concerts to study Covid

Meanwhile, a group called “Querdenken” (Think outside the box) is challenging a Berlin ban on a march on Saturday against Covid-19 restrictions. The protest has already seen 22,000 people sign up.

A march on 1 August attracted around 20,000 people, made up of mainly Covid-deniers and far-right activists.



Source link

Posted on

Brazil virus death toll hits 28,834, surpassing hard-hit France


Brasília (AFP) – Brazil on Saturday reached 28,834 coronavirus fatalities, authorities said, surpassing hard-hit France and becoming the country with the world’s fourth-highest death toll.

At the epicenter of South America’s coronavirus outbreak, Brazil also saw an increase of 33,274 cases in the past 24 hours — a new daily record, the Health Ministry said.

That number brings Brazil’s total caseload to 498,444, the second-highest in the world, lagging only behind the United States.

Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro remain the hardest-hit states in Brazil in terms of sheer numbers, while per capita rates are higher in the country’s impoverished north and northeast, where health facilities are reaching capacity.

Brazil’s Ministry of Health has indicated “there is no way to foresee” when the country’s outbreak will peak, and experts say the number of cases could be 15 times higher than the confirmed figure because there has been no widespread testing.

The pandemic is spreading across Brazil under a cloud of confrontation, as governors and mayors implement restrictive measures while President Jair Bolsonaro, who has pinned his hopes of re-election on a booming economy, has berated them for imposing what he calls “the tyranny of total quarantine.”

The US death toll now stands at 103,685. The United Kingdom, meanwhile, has a toll of 38,376 and Italy stands at 33,340, according to a latest count by AFP.



Source link

Posted on

100 Jewish graves were desecrated in France. A search for the websites that fueled the hate led to the US


But in early December, that is exactly what happened in the small village of Westhoffen in the Bas-Rhin region of Alsace, in eastern France. No one knows exactly when swastikas and anti-Semitic graffiti were spray-painted onto 107 tombstones in the village’s ancient Jewish cemetery — the 42nd anti-Semitic attack in the region in just 18 months.

French authorities are taking the matter extremely seriously. France’s Interior Minister Christophe Castaner visited Westhoffen the day after the swastikas were discovered and French President Emmanuel Macron paid his respects at the cemetery of Quatzenheim after it was desecrated earlier this year. And yet, no one has been caught.

A source close to the investigation told CNN that locals are believed to be responsible for the recent spree and that they may have been incited by global websites. Extra police resources have been allocated to the search for the culprits and several officers are working on the cases full-time. Part of the difficulty is that the villages are remote and very quiet. And according to the man in charge of the investigation in the Bas-Rhin, the culprits are not your average criminals.

“Normally,” says Colonel Francois Despres, “it is about following the money, but this is another type of criminal and people who are used to adopting a low profile both in society and when they commit acts. So that’s why it’s a question of patience and we are patient and that patience will pay.”

For now, 42 attacks — on graveyards, town halls, schools and cultural centers — remain unpunished and the threat of more remains. While the hunt for the culprits continued on the ground, CNN began to investigate who might be influencing them from afar. What we found was a trail that led us from Alsace, through the Bahamas and Panama, and on to the United States.

People look at tombs at Westhoffen cemetery near Strasbourg after they were desecrated.

Searching the internet, CNN found two French-language websites posting celebratory articles and photographs about the attacks in Alsace. “White Europe” and “Participatory democracy,” are both domiciled outside of France — in the Bahamas and Panama — and therefore beyond the reach of France’s anti-hate speech laws. Both are openly anti-Semitic, with “White Europe” hailing the work of “the proud people of Alsace who are leading the way.”

In response to CNN’s questions, “White Europe” said that although they didn’t know who was responsible, they did support such actions. “Participative democracy” told us that whilst they did not condone the crimes, they believed that the attacks were staged as part of a Jewish conspiracy. Both sites promote the theories of the late American white supremacist David Lane, whose 14-word slogan — “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children” — is a rallying cry for parts of the extreme right. A reference to it was made in the attack at Westhoffen: one of the tombs had been graffitied with the number 14.

Both sites use the American internet infrastructure company Cloudflare — which not only allows websites to get online but helps them stay there, by shielding them from cyberattacks. In the wake of the El Paso mass shooting this summer, Cloudflare discontinued its service to 8chan after a user believed to be the killer was found to have posted a rant on it. Cloudflare also said it stopped its service to the US neo-Nazi blog Daily Stormer in 2017. Not because any laws obliged it to but because it chose to following the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.
Cloudflare said it stopped its service to the US neo-Nazi blog Daily Stormer in 2017 after Charlottesville.

CNN asked the company why it was not doing the same against hate speech that happens to be in French, and much of which is illegal in France, but received no reply.

We also found that posts from the French sites stayed up for a while on Facebook before they were taken down, while Facebook says posts from Daily Stormer are blocked from being shared. After CNN reached out to ask about Facebook’s policy, the company began blocking the French sites too. Twitter, for its part, allows the sharing of posts from both the French sites and Daily Stormer. In response to CNN’s questions, the company said it will start blocking certain content in the future. Twitter also said that they take action on content that violates their policies, including hateful conduct.

The trouble is that for the time being, with hate speech on the internet so far beyond the reach of national laws, the only restrictions that apply to it are decided by private companies and on a case-by-case basis. Guillaume Debré says it is time that this global problem received a global solution. “Without it,” he says, “you’re going to have more Westhoffens, more Quatzenheims and others and not just in France but in New Zealand and in America.”

It is an issue on which France is seeking to lead the way in the wake of the Christchurch attack, live-streamed on the internet. Soon after, the French government announced a bill, now working its way through the parliament, that seeks to force social media platforms to be responsible for the content they distribute. Companies like Facebook would have 24 hours to take hate speech down after users flagged it or face a hefty fine.

In an exclusive interview with France’s Interior Minister, we asked whether the United States, where so many of the internet giants are based, was doing enough. “No. And my answer is clear,” said Castaner, “because there is a clear difference of culture.”

“It is not about opposing French or European culture to American culture, but clearly on these subjects there is a belief in the freedom to say anything and everything. I believe that there is no freedom when it is us and our fundamental values that are being attacked.”

French Interior Minister Christophe Castaner, center, visits the Jewish cemetery at Westhoffen after the attack this month.
In the meantime, the French government says it is doing what it can. After visiting Westhoffen, Castaner announced a national taskforce dedicated to investigating and fighting hate crimes. This in a country that has Europe’s largest Jewish population — 550,000 people — and where in 2018 the number of anti-Semitic attacks, which includes both threats and assaults, rose by about 75%, according to the latest interior ministry figures.

One question is why these attacks have happened in this particular area of France. Positioned on France’s border with Germany and Switzerland, Alsace has changed hands several times over the centuries. A history reflected in its local dialect — far closer to German than to French — and in its culture. It is also a region that has one of the oldest Jewish populations in Europe, first documented in the 12th century.

Long confined to the villages by edicts that banned them from the cities, the Jewish community was an important part of rural life in the Bas-Rhin region. Relations between the communities were not always calm — there were regular pogroms and sectarian tensions between local Protestants and Catholic populations — but for 1,000 years they lived side by side. By the 20th century though, local Jews were migrating to Strasbourg, a rural exodus hastened by World War II, and leaving behind only their cemeteries. In all, there are just 45 cemeteries of them in the Bas-Rhin.

Inside one of the largest — and heavily guarded — synagogues in Europe, the chief rabbi of Strasbourg, Harold Weill, told us that it was because Alsace had such a vibrant and well-integrated Jewish population that those on the extreme fringes chose to target it, warning that “hatred that begins with the Jews, never ends with the Jews.”

Yoav Rossano, is on the frontline of that hatred. In his role as the head of Jewish heritage in the Bas-Rhin he is often the first on the scene of attacks and the first to be confronted by the symbols of hate.

“It is awaking the history,” he says of the recent spate of attacks. “Part of the family line died in Auschwitz so to see here in my region, you feel a big responsibility.”

That responsibility both protects the history of the Jewish population here and ensures its future.

But it is a lonely and difficult battle with ancient regional tensions now being fed by an international white supremacy movement facilitated by technology.

Global hate is now fanning local flames and that may be harder for Rossano to stop.



Source link

Posted on

France braces for further strikes over pension changes | World news


French unions are staging a second round of mass street demonstrations as the country entered its sixth day of a nationwide strike and transport standstill over proposed plans to change the pensions system.

The government’s standoff with unions continued as the prime minister, Édouard Philippe, said he would stand firm and announce details of the pension changes on Wednesday, with speculation over possible concessions on the start date in order to diffuse growing tensions on the streets.

The government was watching Tuesday’s turnout after being caught off-guard by the scale of last week’s street protests when at least 800,000 people took part in one of the biggest demonstrations of trade union strength in a decade.

Crucially, the number of protesters has been particularly high in small provincial towns, echoing the mood of the gilets jaunes anti-government protests earlier this year. People are angry not only with pensions but low salaries, worsening prospects, the state of public services and what one demonstrator called “the feeling of being forgotten”.

Commuters wait on a platform at the Gare du Nord RER station on Tuesday morning



Commuters wait on a platform at the Gare du Nord RER station on Tuesday morning. Photograph: Eric Gaillard/Reuters

One local MP for president Emmanuel Macron’s party said it would be hard to tackle a protest movement that spread from pensions to several different grievances at once.

Across the country, transport turmoil continued on Tuesday with trains at a virtual halt, some flights grounded, 10 lines of the Paris metro closed and more than 300km of traffic jams on roads around Paris by 7am. Teachers, hospital staff, fire officers, air-traffic controllers and other public sector workers were expected to walk out alongside train drivers and transport workers.

In the greater Paris area, where more than 9 million people depend on an already overburdened public transport system each day, there were dangerous crushes on packed platforms as crowds of commuters tried to push on to the very few banlieue trains running at rush-hour.

Commuters wait at Gare de l’Est train station in Paris during a strike by SNCF workers and the Paris transport network RATP as part of a second day of nationwide strikes.



Commuters wait at Gare de l’Est train station in Paris during a strike by SNCF workers and the Paris transport network RATP. Photograph: Christian Hartmann/Reuters

Macron, the pro-business president who has promised to deliver the biggest “transformation” of the French social model and welfare system since the postwar era, regards his pension reforms as a key test.

He has staked his political credibility on refusing to buckle in the face of street protests, accusing previous presidents of lacking the resolve to stand strong. With Macron potentially aiming to run for a second term in office the 2022 presidential election, backing down would be to risk losing his support-base. But demonstrators said they feared France’s social safety net was being unpicked.

Union members and employees of the Paris transport network RATP block a bus depot in Les-Pavillons-sous-Bois near Paris



Union members and employees of the Paris transport network RATP block a bus depot in Les-Pavillons-sous-Bois near Paris. Photograph: Lucien Libert/Reuters

The government argues that unifying the French pensions system – and getting rid of the 42 “special” regimes for sectors ranging from rail and energy workers to lawyers and Paris Opera staff – is crucial to keep the system financially viable as the French population ages. But unions say the changes are an attack on fundamental worker rights, and fear people will have to work longer for smaller pensions.

Police ordered all shops to close on the route of the demonstration in southern Paris. Other big marches were planned in cities including Grenoble, Lyon and Rouen.



Source link

Posted on

Leaders of UK, France, Germany, Turkey discuss Syria



Ahead of the two-day NATO summit in London, four countries discussed their efforts to end the conflict in Syria.

France’s President Emmanuel Macron, Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and German Chancellor Angela Merkel met at the prime ministerial residence in London.

According to a statement from the British Prime Minister’s office, the leaders agreed that attacks against Syrian civilians, including in the rebel-held area of Idlib, must end.

The leaders vowed to work for creating conditions for safe return of refugees, and agreed the fight against terrorism in all its forms must continue. They also discussed Turkey’s Operation Peace Spring targeting the terrorist YPG/PKK in northern Syria. Merkel described the meeting as “good and useful”.

Erdogan also described the meeting as good, and added that developments regarding the operation “will be evaluated”.

In October, Turkey launched Peace Spring to eliminate YPG/PKK terrorists from northern Syria, in order to secure Turkey’s borders and aid in the safe return of Syrian refugees. Later, the operation was paused to allow the withdrawal of the terrorists from the planned Syria safe zone, but they, instead, continued attacking soldiers and civilians.



Source link