Posted on

Alberta justice minister warns Edmonton and Calgary not to comply with calls to ‘defund the police’


Article content continued

“As minister of municipal affairs, (Madu) was very keen on scrubbing down our budgets,” Iveson said. “Now, as minister of justice, to suggest that we should not be looking at our largest cost centre — which is policing — seems a bit ironic to me.”

Iveson’s office did not respond to emailed follow-up questions about Madu’s specific comments by press time.

Alberta Justice Minister Kaycee-Madu: “An adequately funded police service is essential to ensure that all citizens are able to live safe and secure lives in our communities.” Photo by David Bloom/Postmedia/File

On Thursday, Calgary city council met with the police commission and Calgary police management about the state of policing in the city; the day before, the Calgary Police Service released a document detailing its commitment to anti-racism and equality.

The force argued there needed to be new policing models and would favour reallocating some funding — amounts are not specified — to other community agencies.

“We are in agreement with the community that better models of systems integration involving health, social services, justice, and policing could produce better outcomes and reduce demand on police,” the report reads.

In Edmonton, council voted in June to remove $11 million from the 2021 police budget of around $389 million and approved 20 proposals to reform policing in the city.

In his letter, Madu argues “an adequately funded police service is essential to ensure that all citizens are able to live safe and secure lives in our communities.”

“This is particularly true of racialized members of our communities, including Indigenous Albertans, who are often overrepresented as victims of crime,” he writes.



Source link

Posted on

Edmonton announces new fire chief – Edmonton


The City of Edmonton has announced Joe Zatylny as the city’s new fire chief.

Zatylny is currently a deputy chief with the Calgary Fire Department.

“With more than 25 years of emergency service experience, including over 10 years in senior fire leadership roles, we are fortunate and excited to have Joe lead Edmonton Fire Rescue Services and continue its legacy of exceptional work,” interim city manager Adam Laughlin said in a media release Tuesday morning.

Zatylny’s appointment comes after former chief of Edmonton Fire Rescue Services Ken Block announced his resignation in December.


READ MORE:
Chief Ken Block resigns from Edmonton fire department: ‘We are truly grateful’

Block was Edmonton’s fire chief for 10 years before announcing he was heading to Australia to become the first fire commissioner of soon-to-be established Fire Rescue Victoria in Victoria, Australia.

Story continues below advertisement

During his time with the Calgary Fire Department, Zatylny led the fire training academy, critical medical response support, technical teams support, 911 service management and hazardous materials response support.

He also focused much of his work on training sustainability, fostering a culture of empowerment and enhancing firefighter health and wellness, the City of Edmonton’s media release read.

“Building on the strengths of Edmonton Fire Rescue Services, incoming chief Zatylny has been given a clear mandate to evolve and enhance EFRS to meet the demands of a changing, growing and diverse city,” said Rob Smyth, deputy city manager of Citizen Services.

“We expect he will focus his leadership on strengthening our frontline fire rescue services, fire prevention programs and public education to make the city a safer and healthier place.”

Zatylny has a a Bachelor’s Degree from Lakeland College Canada in Applied Business of Emergency Services and an Advanced Certificate in Labour and Industrial Relations from Queen’s University. He also received a Master’s Certificate in Municipal Leadership from the Schulich School of Business at York University.

Zatylny will officially take over the role on June 1.




© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.







Source link

Posted on

Catholic Archdiocese of Edmonton joins TikTok social media video app – Edmonton


One of the oldest institutions has turned to one of the newest social media sites to help spread the Good Word.

The Catholic Archdiocese of Edmonton decided to join TikTok after noticing a drop in engagement on other social media sites like Instagram.

It is one of the first religious organizations to use the platform in Canada. Officials told Global News the decision was not an easy one, but that it is a natural step.

“Evangelization, you know, in different mediums is not a new thing,” social media strategist Lincoln Ho explained of the decision.

The app is one of the fastest-growing social networking sites in the world, accumulating 500 million active users worldwide since launching in 2016.


READ MORE:
Memes, dance challenges, social awareness: looking back on TikTok’s tumultuous year

Story continues below advertisement

In fact, it beat out a few of its more seasoned competitors, like Twitter and Snapchat, which boast about 330 million and 203 million active users, respectively.

The mobile TikTok app allows users to shoot and edit short videos set to music and has been downloaded more than 1.5 billion times.

The videos range in length from 15 to 60 seconds, and feature an array of content from comedy sketches and dance challenges to lip-syncing celebrities and pranks.

Many of the videos are adaptations of other trends on the platform. For the Archdiocese, the first video posted was meant to promote their Day of Confessions.

It showed St. Joseph’s Basilica pastoral counsel Scott Jenken walk into a confessional wearing jeans before coming out in robes.

Pastoral Counsel Scott Jenken can be seen in a TIk Tok video posted by The Catholic Archdiocese of Edmonton.

Pastoral Counsel Scott Jenken can be seen in a TIk Tok video posted by The Catholic Archdiocese of Edmonton.


Tik Tok

“I was serving for the Archbishop Sunday and my good friend Lincoln had approached me and said, ‘Scott, you’re going to do this.’ And I said, ‘Oh. Okay,’” Jenken explained.

Story continues below advertisement

The video has only been viewed a modest 300 times (as of Monday morning) but Jenken said it’s made its way to parishioners.

“I have heard a few people come and say, ‘I saw you on that TikTok’ and I thought, ‘Oh! Goodness!’”


Tweet This

While they’re happy to share the message with Catholics, the idea is to also break through to those who aren’t frequent attendees.

“You never really know who you’re going to reach with this and so you might capture someone’s attention who says, ‘Hey, I should go and maybe do confession,’” Jenken said.


READ MORE:
After thousands descend on Toronto Eaton Centre, concerns raised amid TikTok’s rising popularity

Ho plans to use the videos to do just that. He has already created others including a video based on a so-called Paper Towel Challenge spreading on the app.

It sees users write on two sides of a paper towel then put it on water, revealing two messages.

@archedmonton

Spring be late… typical #Edmonton weather right?#papertowelchallenge #timechange #yeg #pourtoi #archedmonton #catholic #alberta #tiktokcanada

♬ Originalton – qwestar


Tweet This

Story continues below advertisement

That kind of creativity doesn’t come easily.

“A TikTok actually takes way more planning than other ones that I’ve done.”


Tweet This

But Ho believes it is worth the effort.


READ MORE:
Teens love TikTok. Should parents be concerned?

Using social media to evangelize is not unprecedented — Pope Francis joined Twitter in 2012. In that time, he has amassed more than 18 million followers.

It’s why the Archdiocese of Edmonton believes he would be on board with their latest venture.

“I think he’d approve, certainly,” Jenken said.

The Catholic Archdiocese of Edmonton can be found on TikTok as @ArchEdmonton. You can also follow Global News @globalnews.ca.

TikTok and its parent company, Chinese technology company Bytedance, are not without controversy.

In early December 2019, TikTok admitted to suppressing the content of users it deemed ‘susceptible to bullying’, namely people with disabilities or those in the LGBTQ2+ community.

It also faced public scrutiny over allegations that the platform removed politically-sensitive content for users in China.


READ MORE:
‘Another Holocaust’: Viral makeup tutorial exposes China’s Muslim persecution

Story continues below advertisement

WATCH BELOW: Marc Saltzman explains the TikTok craze and shares this month’s tAPPworthy apps






What is TikTok?


What is TikTok?

— With files from Sara Hussein, Global News




© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.







Source link

Posted on

Students east of Edmonton take on project to build beds for children in need – Edmonton


A number of schools east of Edmonton have partnered with a local charity to help ensure children in the area who don’t have a proper bed will get one.

On Wednesday, Elk Island Public Schools (EIPS) issued a news release about the initiative, which sees Bev Facey Community High School, F.R. Haythorne Junior High School and Strathcona Christian Academy Secondary work with Sleep in Heavenly Peace, a charity that operates in Strathcona County.

EIPS said students at the schools had learned from the charity about sleeping conditions some families in the area are enduring and “agreed to turn their construction labs into bed-producing workshops to help the charity meet demand.”

“Each school pledged to build 60 beds, and under the guidance of their construction teachers, students of all grade levels got to cutting, routing and sanding bedframes and bundling the finished pieces for delivery,” Laura McNabb, director of communication services for EIPS, said in a news release.



Story continues below advertisement

READ MORE: Ontario man builds furniture for families in need

According to the school division, many students took part in assembling the beds themselves.

“Building these beds with my class made me realize how fortunate I am,” said Sarah Weidmann, a Grade 12 construction student at Bev Facey. “I can’t remember a time where I didn’t have a bed with pillows and blankets to sleep on.

“These families who are having trouble meeting their basic needs are out there and we don’t even realize it. By building these beds, I know we’re helping to make a difference for these kids.”

Students at F.R. Haythorne also planned a school dance and a “game-a-thon” to raise money to buy bedding for the initiative. EIPS said that fundraising campaign raised nearly $2,250 and was able to purchase 44 sets of bedding.

“The initiative students have shown in organizing this fundraiser is inspiring,” said Erin Clark, an assistant principal at F.R. Haythorne. “They were responsible for all of it, from the initial planning, to the organizing and running of the events.

“We’re so proud of what they’ve been able to accomplish.”


Tweet This

According to EIPS, some beds were already delivered to families but more are still to come.

Story continues below advertisement




© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.







Source link