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Person under 18 dies of coronavirus in Los Angeles, health experts report



Los Angeles County on Tuesday confirmed four more deaths linked to the coronavirus, including the first of a person under the age of 18.

The number of deaths in the county from the virus is now 11. Tuesday’s update also included a previously reported death in Long Beach. The young person who died was from Lancaster. No further details were immediately available.

“This is a devastating reminder that COVID-19 affects people of all ages,” L.A. County Public Health Department director Barbara Ferrer said.

Two of the people who died were between the ages of 50 and 70. One had underlying health issues and resided in the West Adams neighborhood, health officials said.

Officials also confirmed an additional 128 cases of coronavirus infections, bringing the county’s total to 662. Of those positive cases, 42% occurred in individuals between the ages of 18 and 40, and 39% were in people ages 41 to 65.

At least 119 residents, or 18% of all positive cases in the county, have been hospitalized for the virus.

In Orange County, officials announced 27 new coronavirus cases, bringing the total to 152. There have not been any deaths linked to COVID-19.

San Mateo County saw a jump of 19 new cases and its second fatality, pushing the county’s overall total to 161 positive tests. The number of cases increased by more than 10% in one day, according to Preston Merchant, a public information officer working in the county’s joint information center.

The county’s second death occurred Monday at the Atria Senior Living facility in Burlingame. The facility received news of confirmed COVID-19 cases in their community on March 15. A number of residents tested positive for the virus, and Monday’s fatality was the senior facility’s first coronavirus-related death at its Burlingame location.

“Our thoughts are with their family during this difficult time,” Atria said in a statement. “We remain in close communication with all our residents and their families and continue to provide our support as we navigate this unprecedented situation together.”

Atria said it is working closely with the San Mateo County Health Department, and officials have been on site to confirm proper health and safety measures are in place.

The number of coronavirus cases in California surged to nearly 2,500 Tuesday afternoon and the death toll climbed to 50 as officials issued urgent warnings about the need for more hospital beds and equipment as medical facilities begin to fill up.

Gov. Gavin Newsom says he believes California will need 50,000 hospital beds for patients suffering from the illness caused by the coronavirus. That marks a significant increase from the 20,000 beds his administration forecast last week. The Democratic governor said the state’s 416 hospitals were doubling their “surge plans,” a move that will result in 30,000 new beds across the system.

San Francisco officials warned that a surge in coronavirus infections was expected to come within a week or two, and voiced dismay over images of the public crowding beaches and parks across California.

“The worst is yet to come,” said Dr. Grant Colfax, San Francisco’s director of public health, at a news conference Monday.

San Francisco has already taken steps to decompress the healthcare system — banning almost all visitors to hospitals and long-term-care facilities, canceling elective surgeries and routine medical visits, ordering that appointments be done by phone or video if possible, and opening up tents to care for patients who have mild symptoms in order to keep hospital beds free for those more seriously ill.

A steep rise in people being hospitalized with COVID-19 in Los Angeles County likely signals the approach of a wave of extremely sick patients that could overwhelm hospitals in the coming weeks, experts say.

As of March 6, five people in the county had been hospitalized at some point with COVID-19. Two weeks later, on Friday, that figure had jumped to 48. By Monday, the total had climbed to 90.

Though the raw numbers remain relatively low, the rate of increase has set many doctors and nurses on edge after watching the disease’s alarming trajectory in China, Italy and, most recently, New York City.

Two Cal State Long Beach students tested positive for the virus and were in self-isolation off campus, the university announced in an email to students Tuesday morning.

One student had not been on campus for two weeks, the university said. In the second case, public health officials determined there was no opportunity for on-campus exposure. Students who might have come into close contact with the patients were being notified by health officials, according to the email.

As the number of cases continues to rise, officials throughout the state kept up their call for an increase in testing capacity and reporting.

Frustrated public health directors in six Bay Area counties have ordered an assortment of commercial, university and pop-up testing sites that are screening residents for COVID-19 to begin reporting not just the positive cases, but the negative results too.

Dr. Sara Cody said testing remains woefully inadequate as Santa Clara County wrestles with mounting deaths. As of Tuesday, 16 people had died in the county, more than half of the virus fatalities in California.

Santa Clara County’s Sheriff’s Office confirmed four cases among staff, including a deputy who is self-isolating at home.

California requires labs and hospitals to report known cases of COVID-19, but not the number of negative tests. Cody said that information is critical to tracking the spread of the virus. She warned that Santa Clara County’s current critical situation is a window into what will be seen in San Francisco and other Bay Area communities in the next one to two weeks.

Contra Costa County is one of the six counties that ordered new requirements. On Friday, health officer Chris Farnitano said the county would issue an order for negative tests to be reported as well.

Meanwhile, California remains largely shut down under state and local orders. L.A. County officials have cracked down on nonessential businesses, which Sheriff Alex Villanueva declared Tuesday includes gun stores. If gun sellers don’t close their doors, he said, they will be cited and face penalty, including the loss of their business licenses.

Officials previously closed beach parking lots, parks and hiking trials amid concerns some people were not staying at least six feet apart while in public. Laguna Beach took the restrictions a step further and closed its beaches entirely on Monday.

On Tuesday, Los Angeles City Councilman David Ryu called for the closure of Runyon Canyon Park and Lake Hollywood Park on weekends.

“Making this request pains me greatly. I grew up in a two-bedroom apartment off the 101 Freeway, and our city’s parks were my only access to outdoor space,” Ryu said of his recommendation to Michael Shull, the general manager of the city’s Department of Recreation and Parks. “I don’t make this recommendation easily, but closing Runyon Canyon Park on weekends, when we have seen the highest volume of visitors, should follow to keep everyone safe.”

In Sonoma County, all parks and open spaces were closed indefinitely, public health officials announced this week.

The closure includes city, county, state and federal parklands and recreational lands operated by private groups and nonprofits, according to a news release.

“Closing parks is a difficult decision, but it is the right decision at this time,” Sundari Mase, the county’s interim health officer, said in a statement. “Allowing crowded conditions in parks is not in our best interest during this health crisis. The best action we can take is to stay close to home and limit our outdoor time to our yards and neighborhoods.”

Mase announced the closure Monday after too many visitors flocked to outdoor spaces over the weekend.

Criminal and civil trials were discontinued in California for at least two months after a sweeping order was issued late Monday by the state’s chief justice that aimed to sharply reduce public traffic in state courthouses.

Chief Justice Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye said in her order that court facilities were “ill-equipped to effectively allow the social distancing and other public health requirements” that had been imposed across California to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.

“Even if court facilities could allow for sufficient social distancing, the closure of schools means that many court employees, litigants, witnesses, and potential jurors cannot leave their homes to attend court proceedings because they must stay home to supervise their children,” Cantil-Sakauye said in the order.

The 60-day delay — which puts the courts in California’s 58 counties on a uniform trial delay schedule — came the same day that the presiding judge of Los Angeles County Superior Court, Kevin C. Brazile, blocked public access to county courthouses except for attorneys, staff, defendants and “authorized persons,” a vague category that includes news reporters. The clerk’s office will still be available to accept filings and assist people by phone or electronically.

The California National Guard on Monday provided details about how personnel would be deployed across the state to assist in coronavirus aid. Officials said the guard was being used purely for humanitarian purposes, such as distributing food and medical supplies as well as helping at food banks and working with officials on the Grand Princess cruise ship, which docked in California after an outbreak of the virus on board.

With the coronavirus pandemic further stifling the efforts of California and other states to issue Real ID licenses, President Trump on Monday said he would extend the Oct. 1 deadline for people to apply for the identification cards to board domestic flights in the United States.

Times staff writers Priscella Vega, Paige St. John and Luke Money contributed to this report.





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Man dies and his wife is in critical care after they ‘took fish tank cleaner to cure coronavirus’


Man who tried to treat himself with hydroxychloroquine DIES: Couple ate fish tank cleaner thinking it was the malaria drug that Trump is touting as a miracle coronavirus remedy

  • The couple, both in their 60s, were hospitalized after ingesting chloroquine phosphate, an additive often used at aquariums to clean fish tanks
  • The man died and his wife was left in critical condition as a result  
  • It’s believed that they confused the chemical with hydroxychloroquine, an antimalaria drug that’s shown promising results in treating coronavirus patients 
  • Banner Health, a non-profit hospital system based in Arizona, issued a statement about the shocking case on Monday 
  • In the statement experts warned the public against the use of inappropriate medications and household products to prevent or treat COVID-19  
  • President Trump drummed up excitement over hydroxychloroquine when he called the drug a ‘game changer’ last week
  • But the drug has not yet been proven as effective in treating coronavirus  
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

A man has died and his wife is under critical care after they ingested a chemical found commonly found in fish tank cleaner thinking it was the miracle coronavirus cure President Donald Trump touted at a press conference last week.  

Banner Health, a non-profit hospital system based in Arizona, issued a statement urging the public against the use of inappropriate medications and household products to prevent or treat COVID-19 on Monday. 

To emphasize the importance of the warning, officials disclosed a few details of what happened with an unnamed couple that ignored the advice and took their medical care into their own hands.  

The couple, both in their 60s, were rushed to the hospital about 30 minutes after ingesting chloroquine phosphate, according to the statement. 

It’s believed that they confused the chemical – an additive often used at aquariums to clean fish tanks – with hydroxychloroquine, an antimalaria drug that’s shown promising results in treating COVID-19 patients.  

President Donald Trump touted chloroquine as a 'miracle drug' at a press conference last week, but Dr Anthony Fauci, the White House coronavirus expert, quickly followed Trump's comments by saying more work was needed before it could be heralded as a solution

President Donald Trump touted chloroquine as a ‘miracle drug’ at a press conference last week, but Dr Anthony Fauci, the White House coronavirus expert, quickly followed Trump’s comments by saying more work was needed before it could be heralded as a solution

Dr Fauci (center) has not been at the White House coronavirus task force briefing for two days

Dr Fauci (center) has not been at the White House coronavirus task force briefing for two days

A man has died and his wife is under critical care after they ingested chloroquine phosphate, a chemical found commonly found in fish tank cleaner, thinking it was the miracle coronavirus cure President Donald Trump has been touting at his press conferences

A man has died and his wife is under critical care after they ingested chloroquine phosphate, a chemical found commonly found in fish tank cleaner, thinking it was the miracle coronavirus cure President Donald Trump has been touting at his press conferences

Banner Health experts emphasized that people should not take chloroquine under any circumstances unless it’s prescribed by a doctor.  

‘Given the uncertainty around COVID-19, we understand that people are trying to find new ways to prevent or treat this virus, but self-medicating is not the way to do so,’ said Dr Daniel Brooks, Banner Poison and Drug Information Center medical director. 

‘The last thing that we want right now is to inundate our emergency departments with patients who believe they found a vague and risky solution that could potentially jeopardize their health.’ 

Experts noted that the majority of people diagnosed with the novel coronavirus would recover without complications, and that  ‘the routine use of specific treatments, including medications described as “anti-COVID-19”, is not recommended for non-hospitalized patients’.  

‘We are strongly urging the medical community to not prescribe this medication to any non-hospitalized patients,’ Brooks said. 

The statement did not say whether the couple who ingested chloroquine phosphate had been diagnosed with COVID-19 prior to doing so. 

As of Monday there are nearly 42,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in the US and 576 deaths

As of Monday there are nearly 42,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in the US and 576 deaths

New York state officials are expected to begin trials with hydroxychloroquine on Tuesday, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced at a press conference Monday (pictured)

New York state officials are expected to begin trials with hydroxychloroquine on Tuesday, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced at a press conference Monday (pictured)

Hydroxychloroquine has not yet been proven as effective in battling COVID-19, but President Trump drummed up excitement over it when he called it a ‘game changer’ last week. 

Dr Anthony Fauci, the White House coronavirus expert, quickly followed Trump’s comments by saying more work was needed before it could be heralded as a solution.  

New York state officials are expected to begin trials with the medication on Tuesday, according to Governor Andrew Cuomo.  

Meanwhile, many people across the US have praised the drug and credited it with saving their lives – albeit after they were prescribed it by doctors.  





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Baby with heart condition dies from mould exposure at hospital after open heart surgery



A baby with a serious heart condition has died after she received an infection from mould in a Seattle hospital’s operating room, her mother says. 

Elizabeth Hutt was born with a heart condition that she battled for the entirety of her six-month-long life. The young child underwent three open heart surgeries, and after the third one is when it’s believed she contracted an Aspergillus mould infection in the hospital’s operating room. 

Her mother, Katha Hutt, revealed in a Facebook post her daughter died early Wednesday morning at Seattle Children’s Hospital. 


“Elizabeth Vera Hutt gained her wings on her 175th day of life at 4:40 am. Late last night, Beth told us she was ready,” Mrs. Hutt wrote. 

“I cannot begin to express the gratitude we have for the team that worked through the night to make sure Beth’s transition was as painless and smooth as possible. We will post when we’ve had the chance to make plans for celebrating our brave, courageous, beautiful warrior.”

The mould in the hospital’s operating rooms was first detected in November, around the same time as the child’s third surgery. 

Ms Hutt created a Facebook page titled Beth’s HLHS Journey to keep people updated on her daughter’s condition throughout her surgeries. She revealed in January her daughter was battling an infection that stumped her doctors. 

It was later determined the infection was contracted from the mould discovered in three of the 14 operating rooms at the hospital in November. The mould came from the hospital’s air-handling units in the operating rooms, and 14 patients have developed infections from the mould since 2001, the hospital revealed. Seven of those 14 children have since died from their infections. 

“I’m always going to wonder if there were different interventions that could’ve taken place, had the Aspergillus not been there,” Ms Hutt said.

Aspergillus is a common mould typically present in the air that people breathe. It normally does not cause one to get sick, but it can be harmful to people who lack strong immune systems or those who are surgical patients. 

Ms Hutt and her husband, Micah Hutt, told WBTV they knew about the hospital’s Aspergillus problems in 2018, but they still picked the location for their daughter due to the quality of doctors and medical staff at the facility. 

At the time, the parents thought the mould problem was solved. 

They joined a class action suit against Seattle Children’s Hospital in January, which alleges facility managers knew about the mould since 2005 and failed to fix the problem. 

The hospital currently has 11 of its 14 operating rooms shut down, as new HEPA filtration units are installed. The other three operating rooms received the new air units and are open for use. 

Seattle Children’s Hospital said in response to the baby’s death: “Losing a child is incredibly devastating for everyone whose lives were touched by that child. Our deepest condolences go out to families and loved ones who have experienced a loss.”



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Daniel Arap Moi, Kenya’s Longtime Strongman, Dies At 95 : NPR


President of Kenya Daniel arap Moi, shown in a photo from 2002. Moi has died at 95.

Sayyid Abdul Azim/AP


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President of Kenya Daniel arap Moi, shown in a photo from 2002. Moi has died at 95.

Sayyid Abdul Azim/AP

Daniel Arap Moi, who ruled Kenya for nearly a quarter century marked by repression and widespread corruption before he eventually yielded to multiparty democracy and allowed a peaceful transfer of power, has died at age 95.

His death was announced by current President Uhuru Kenyatta, the son of the country’s founding father and first president, Jomo Kenyatta, whose death in office in 1978 paved the way for Moi’s rise.

“Our nation and our continent were immensely blessed by the dedication and service of the Late Mzee Moi; who spent almost his entire adult life serving Kenya and Africa,” Kenyatta said in a statement, using a Swahili term of respect.

Kenyatta announced that flags would be flown at half staff until Moi’s funeral.

“Daniel Toroitich arap Moi ran a good race, kept the faith, and now he is enjoying his reward in heaven,” he said.

There was no immediate word on the cause of death, but Moi had reportedly been in and out of the hospital in recent months with breathing difficulties.

Moi, a school teacher-turned-politician, served as home affairs minister before being appointed vice president in 1967.

After assuming the presidency in 1978, he soon dominated not only politics, but all aspects of Kenyan life.

He was a retail politician, who sought support by doling out favors to supporters. Moi’s ubiquitous ivory walking stick became a symbol of his one-man rule. Despite his intolerance of dissent, he long remained popular.

Inexperienced when he assumed the presidency, Moi became increasingly authoritarian as he found his feet in office. In 1982, his government pushed through a constitutional amendment that essentially legitimized one-party rule. And after a failed coup against him that same year, he sought to repress critics.

In 1987, London-based Amnesty International accused Moi’s government of a “deliberate program to silence or intimidate its political opponents.”

However, by the early 1990s, Moi had acquiesced to international pressure and begun to loosen his grip, allowing multiparty elections. Even so, the ruling Kenya African National Union (KANU) often ran unopposed and when challenged, was able to manipulate a disorganized opposition. Election violence and vote rigging were common.

Although a leading recipient of Western aid, Kenya under Moi fell ever-deeper into economic stagnation, with low or negative growth and periods of steep inflation. As corruption progressively ate away at Kenya’s economy, Moi sought to use the West – and even Asia — as a scapegoat for the country’s troubles.

By 2002, an aging Moi agreed to step down ahead of elections. In his last speech as president, he reiterated one of his frequent themes, warning against ethnic conflict, which he called “a cancer that has destroyed many nations in Africa.”

Musalia Mudavadi, who was Moi’s deputy, tells NPR that the long-time leader’s legacy should be his peaceful transfer of power. “To me, that is a tribute that we must never forget,” he said.

But another legacy is just as salient — and perhaps more enduring. After Moi relinquished the presidency, subsequent investigations documented torture cells at Nyayo House in Nairobi, where his political opponents were imprisoned, beaten and killed.

Speaking in October, Kenyan lawyer Miguna Miguna said Moi was “among the world’s most brutal tyrants.”

“He detained real and imagined critics without trial,” Miguna said.



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US Army Reserve soldier serving in Syria dies from injuries sustained in rollover accident


Spc. Antonio I. Moore, 22, was on his first deployment when he died.

A 22-year-old U.S. Army Reserve soldier serving in Syria has died from injuries he sustained in a vehicle rollover accident.

Spc. Antonio Moore was conducting route clearance operations as part of Operation Inherent Resolve in Deir ez-Zor Province in eastern Syria when he died Friday, according to the Army. It was his first deployment.

Moore, who is from Wilmington, North Carolina, enlisted in the Army in 2017 as a combat engineer, officials said. He was assigned to the 346th Engineer Company, 363d Engineer Battalion, 411th Engineer Brigade, in Knightdale, North Carolina.

About 750 troops are in eastern Syria, The Associated Press reported, citing military officials.

“The 363rd Engineer Battalion is deeply saddened at the loss of Spec. Antonio Moore,” Lt. Col. Ian Doiron, 363rd Engineer Battalion commander, said in a statement Saturday. “Antonio was one of the best in our formation. He will be missed by all who served with him. We will now focus on supporting his family and honoring his legacy and sacrifice.”

Moore’s awards and decorations include the National Defense Service Medal and the Army Service Ribbon. He is survived by his mother, stepfather, three brothers and a sister.

The accident is under investigation.



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Man dies after setting fire to keep warm in Cudahy, authorities say



A man died Monday night in Cudahy after apparently starting a fire in an enclosed dumpster area in an attempt to keep warm, authorities said.

Firefighters responded to a report of a fire behind a store in the 4500 block of Santa Ana Street about 10:30 p.m. and found two dumpsters burning. They put out the flames and discovered the man’s body.

Preliminary investigation indicates that the man climbed into a walled-in and gated enclosure where dumpsters are stored and set a fire beside them to heat himself, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Lt. Derrick Alfred said. He then caught fire, suffering significant burns and probable smoke inhalation, Alfred said.

The man is believed to have been homeless. His name was not immediately released.





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Marie Fredriksson of Swedish pop duo Roxette dies at 61


STOCKHOLM —
Marie Fredriksson, the female half of the Swedish pop duo Roxette, has died at age 61, her management agency said Tuesday.

Fredriksson formed Roxette with Per Gessle in 1986. The two released their first album the same year and went on to achieve international success in the late 1980s and 1990s.

The Dimberg Jernberg agency said Fredriksson died Monday “of the consequences of a long illness.”

It “is with great sorrow that we must inform you that one of greatest and most-loved artists is gone,” the firm said.

Fredriksson became ill in 2002 and was diagnosed with a brain tumour. She underwent radiation treatment and had continued health problems.

Fredriksson is survived by her husband, Mikael Bolyos, and their two children, Josefin and Oscar.



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Pete Frates, whose battle with ALS inspired the Ice Bucket Challenge, dies at 34


Pete Frates, the former college baseball star whose battle with ALS inspired the Ice Bucket Challenge, has passed away at the age of 34. 

Frates, of Massachusetts, was a symbol of hope for people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and helped raised awareness and over $200million for research on the neurodegenerative disease that weakens muscles and impacts movement. There is no cure for ALS.

The Frates family confirmed his death on Monday in a heartfelt statement. 

‘Today Heaven received our angel: Peter Frates. A husband to Julie, a father to Lucy, a son to John and Nancy, a brother to Andrew and Jennifer, Pete passed away surrounded by his loving family, peacefully at age 34, after a heroic battle with ALS,’ the statement said.

In 2014 he launched the ALS Bucket Challenge, a viral sensation in which people dumped buckets of ice on themselves, donated to ALS research, and nominated friends to do the same.

The challenge, in which more than 17million people participated, raised over a whopping $200million worldwide, according to the ALS Association.     

Pete Frates, the former college baseball star whose battle with ALS inspired the Ice Bucket Challenge, has passed away at the age of 34, his family announced Monday

Pete Frates, the former college baseball star whose battle with ALS inspired the Ice Bucket Challenge, has passed away at the age of 34, his family announced Monday

In 2014 he launched the ALS Bucket Challenge, a viral sensation in which people dumped buckets of ice on themselves, donated to ALS research, and nominated friends to do the same. The challenge raised a whopping $200million worldwide. Frates pictured above participating in the challenge surrounded by his family

In 2014 he launched the ALS Bucket Challenge, a viral sensation in which people dumped buckets of ice on themselves, donated to ALS research, and nominated friends to do the same. The challenge raised a whopping $200million worldwide. Frates pictured above participating in the challenge surrounded by his family

His alma mater Boston College, where he played baseball and graduated in 2007 and where he went on to become Director of Baseball Operations, shared a tribute for him on Monday

His alma mater Boston College, where he played baseball and graduated in 2007 and where he went on to become Director of Baseball Operations, shared a tribute for him on Monday

Former Red Sox player David Ortis shared this tribute to Pete on Monday saying: 'I'm so very proud to have called you my friend. Heart hurts a lot today but ur name and legacy will live on forever. Rest easy my friend - we’ll continue to spread your word'

Former Red Sox player David Ortis shared this tribute to Pete on Monday saying: ‘I’m so very proud to have called you my friend. Heart hurts a lot today but ur name and legacy will live on forever. Rest easy my friend – we’ll continue to spread your word’

‘A natural born leader and the ultimate teammate, Pete was a role model for all, especially young athletes, who looked up to him for his bravery and unwavering positive spirit in the face of adversity,’ his family shared in their statement. 

‘He was a noble fighter who inspired us all to use our talents and strengths in the service of others.’

His family noted that Frates, from Beverly, never complained about his illness, but dedicated his life to raising awareness about it.  

‘Instead, he saw it as an opportunity to give hope to other patients and their families. In his lifetime, he was determined to change the trajectory of a disease that had no treatment or cure. As a result, through his determination—along with his faithful supporters, Team Frate Train—he championed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge,’ the family statement said.  

In college Frates played baseball for Boston College and graduated in May 2007. 

After graduating he was named the director of baseball operations for Boston College Baseball in 2012. That same year at the age of 27 he was diagnosed with ALS. 

Frates pictured above back in 2006 when he played on Boston College's baseball team, six years before his ALS diagnosis

Frates pictured above back in 2006 when he played on Boston College’s baseball team, six years before his ALS diagnosis

Pete Frates pictured above with his wife Julie Frates and their daughter Lucy in 2017

Pete Frates pictured above with his wife Julie Frates and their daughter Lucy in 2017

Pete and his wife Julie married eight months after he was diagnosed and share a five-year-old daughter named Lucy.  

In 2014 he launched the ALS Bucket Challenge, which captured the attention of millions of people worldwide including big celebrities like Oprah Winfrey, Bill Gates, Will Smith and Lady Gaga. 

ALS is also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, named after a baseball player who was diagnosed with it in the 1930s. The progressive condition was first discovered by a French doctor back in 1869. 

Frates shared this snap holding his young daughter in September this year

Frates shared this snap holding his young daughter in September this year 

Family first! Pete smiles with his wife and daughter as they sport Boston College gear

Family first! Pete smiles with his wife and daughter as they sport Boston College gear

Julie and Pete Frates (pictured together in 2014 in New York City) tied the knot in 2013

Julie and Pete Frates (pictured together in 2014 in New York City) tied the knot in 2013

In October 2014 the New England Council named him the ‘New Englander of the Year for his pioneering work in raising ALS awareness. In December 2014 he was named one of Sports Illustrated’s Inspirations of the Year. 

What is ALS? 

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord.

The disease affects the nervous system, weakens muscles and impacts physical function. 

There is no cure for ALS, however medication and therapy can slow ALS and reduce discomfort. 

The 2014 Ice Bucket Challenge raised $200million worldwide towards ALS research in the search for a cure.

Doctor’s don’t usually know why ALS occurs but early warning signs include muscle twitching and slurred speech. 

In 2016 it was estimated between 14,000 and 15,000 Americans have ALS. 

It is a common neuromuscular disease worldwide.  

Source: The Mayo Clinic 

He also received the NCAA Inspiration of the Year Award in 2017. 

Life was difficult for the Frates family after Pete’s ALS diagnosis. He was hospitalized several times and in order to keep him living at home, the Frates faced daunting medical bills that reached $85,000 to $95,000 a month, as per CBS. 

To tackle the costs a friend created a pilot program called the Pete Frates Home Health Initiative in connection with the ALS Association. 

Tributes poured in from Boston figures, where Frates was hailed a hero in his home state, on Monday.

Boston College shared a tribute to the late athlete in light of his death on Monday. 

‘He accepted his illness and devoted the remaining years of his life to raising awareness of ALS and helping to raise money for a cure. He is a role model for all BC students and a beloved figure on our campus,’ the statement said.  

Former Red Sox player David Ortis shared this tribute to Pete on Monday saying: ‘I’m so very proud to have called you my friend. Heart hurts a lot today but ur name and legacy will live on forever. Rest easy my friend – we’ll continue to spread your word.’ 

Hockey team the Boston Bruins shared a tribute for Frates as well: 'His courage, determination, and fight made Boston - and the world - proud. The impact he made on all of us will never be forgotten'

Hockey team the Boston Bruins shared a tribute for Frates as well: ‘His courage, determination, and fight made Boston – and the world – proud. The impact he made on all of us will never be forgotten’

Major League Baseball shared this statement announcing Frates' death saying: 'All of us at Major League Baseball are proud that Pete and his family are members of the baseball family. we will remember Pete's example as we continue to support the pursuit of a cure for ALS'

Major League Baseball shared this statement announcing Frates’ death saying: ‘All of us at Major League Baseball are proud that Pete and his family are members of the baseball family. we will remember Pete’s example as we continue to support the pursuit of a cure for ALS’

Hockey team the Boston Bruins shared a tribute for Frates as well: ‘His courage, determination, and fight made Boston – and the world – proud. The impact he made on all of us will never be forgotten.’ 

He is survived by his wife Julie, daughter Lucy, and parents. 

The family offered those who would like to extend condolences and sympathy to consider making a donation to the Peter Frates Family Foundation, dedicated to aiding progressed ALS patients who want to stay at home. 

A funeral mass will be held at St. Ignatius of Loyola Parish in Chestnut Hill on Friday December 13 at 11am. A celebration of life will take place at a later date.



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Superfan Julia Kmiecik, 92, dies and Wisla Krakow will leave her seat empty in her memory – The Sun


POLISH top flight club Wisla Krakow have left a touching tribute to their superfan that tragically recently passed away.

Julia Kmiecik became a club icon for her unwavering and loyal support over an incredible 51 year period.

 Julia Kmiecik was a Wisla Krakow megafan

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Julia Kmiecik was a Wisla Krakow megafanCredit: [email protected]
 Tributes will remain on her seat at Wisla's stadium

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Tributes will remain on her seat at Wisla’s stadiumCredit: [email protected]

Her dedication was frequently recognised by the club and she was much beloved by her fellow supporters.

So when she recently passed away at the age of 92, tributes came flooding in for the loyal supporter.

But it didn’t stop there.

Having sat in the same seat for years, Wisla decided to lay out a scarf where she sat.

And they announced that the seat will always remain hers, and that nobody else will ever sit there.

Many Wisla fans posted heartfelt tributes on social media.

One labelled her as an: “Outstanding example to every fan in Poland”.

And sadly it’s not been a good season at all for Wisla.

Having lost 7-0 at Legia Warsaw in October, the Polish side find themselves bottom of the Ekstraklasa after 18 games.

And the last win that Kmiecik got to watch her beloved team pick up was a 4-2 triumph over Zaglebie all the way back in August.

But the poor results didn’t waver her commitment to the cause, as her love for the club transcended results on the pitch, and she will be greatly missed.

Frank Lampard is sure that John Terry will receive an amazing reception from Chelsea fans when he returns to Stamford Bridge





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Driver of car dies after collision with lorry in Co Cavan


A man in his 60s has died after a road crash near Belturbet, Co Cavan, on Saturday afternoon.

Gardaí are investigating a collision between the car the man was driving and a lorry which occurred in the Cloverhill area at about 2:20pm.

The driver was pronounced dead at the scene and his body has been removed to Cavan General Hospital.

Gardaí are appealing for anyone with information, particularly any road users with dashcam footage who may have been passing through at the time, to contact Cavan Garda station on 049 436 8800 or the Garda Confidential Line on 1800 666 111.



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