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Coronavirus vaccine volunteer in Brazil’s AstraZeneca trial dies, but authorities say trial to continue


A volunteer in Brazil’s trial of AstraZeneca’s experimental coronavirus vaccine has died, the Brazilian health agency Anvisa announced on Wednesday, but organizers said there was no reason to stop the trial — an indication that the death is not linked to the vaccine.

Anvisa said that it was notified of the death on Monday but the International Evaluation and Security Committee overseeing the trial recommended that the trial continue. It was not clear whether the volunteer received the vaccine or a placebo shot as part of the trial, and Anvisa said no more information was being released for reasons of medical privacy.

“All significant medical incidents, whether participants are in the control group or the COVID-19 vaccine group, are independently reviewed. Following careful assessment of this case in Brazil, there have been no concerns about safety of the clinical trial and the independent review in addition to the Brazilian regulator have recommended that the trial should continue,” Oxford University told CNN in an emailed statement on Wednesday.

So far, the D’Or Institute, which is administering the clinical trial in Rio, said 8,000 volunteers had received either the vaccine or a placebo in the trial.

“The rigorous analysis of data collected up to now did not raise any doubts about the safety of the study, and thus recommended that it continue,” the Institute said in a statement.

A spokesman for vaccine maker AstraZeneca declined to comment specifically on reports that a volunteer in its trial of a coronavirus vaccine in Brazil had died, but indicated nothing had happened to justify stopping or pausing the trial.

“We cannot comment on individual cases in an ongoing trial of the Oxford vaccine as we adhere strictly to medical confidentiality and clinical trial regulations, but we can confirm that all required review processes have been followed,” the spokesman told CNN.

“All significant medical events are carefully assessed by trial investigators, an independent safety monitoring committee and the regulatory authorities. These assessments have not led to any concerns about continuation of the ongoing study.”

Vaccine experts note that volunteers in clinical trials can become ill or die for any number of reasons, and they may not be related to the vaccine.

“Without details it’s impossible to know what has happened in this case but as the trial is continuing, I think we can assume the circumstances of the death were such that it was clearly not vaccine related,” Ian Jones, a professor of virology at Britain’s University of Reading, said in a statement.

“What we have to remember is that in any large trial the normal processes of morbidity (sickness) and mortality are still operating and that sometimes an event will occur in a trial participant which would have occurred anyway, trial or not.”

 

AstraZeneca vaccine trial paused previously

A death in a trial requires investigation to confirm whether the volunteer received the vaccine or a placebo — and whether the death was due to trial participation or unrelated reasons.

AstraZeneca’s vaccine continues testing in tens of thousands of volunteers around the world, but the recent news of a death is now the third adverse announcement from the trial.

In July, AstraZeneca put its trial on a “brief pause” while a safety review took place to investigate a volunteer’s illness. That volunteer’s condition wasn’t announced until later, when AstraZeneca wrote in an email to CNN that the patient was found to have “an undiagnosed case of multiple sclerosis” and an independent panel concluded the condition was “unrelated to the vaccine.”

Then in September, AstraZeneca announced it had paused global trials of its coronavirus vaccine because of an illness in another volunteer. AstraZeneca’s Phase 3 US trial started August 31, and then the trial pause was announced September 8.

In mid-September, CNN obtained an internal safety report by AstraZeneca that shed light on the condition suffered by the volunteer.

The report detailed how the volunteer, a previously health 37-year-old woman, “experienced confirmed transverse myelitis” — an inflammation of the spinal cord — after receiving her second dose of the vaccine and was hospitalized on September 5.

The trial has resumed in the U.K. but remains on pause in the U.S.



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Biker in his 60s dies after collision with car in Co Carlow


A male motorcyclist has died after a road collision in Co Carlow on Saturday afternoon.

Gardaí are investigating the fatal crash involving a motorcycle and a car in the Mullawn area of Tullow, Co Carlow, at about 3:10pm.

The biker, a man ages in his 60s, was taken by air ambulance from the scene to Beaumont Hospital, where he has since died. The driver of the car was uninjured.

A technical examination of the crash location has taken place.

Gardaí are appealing for all those with information, particularly road users who may have collected dash-cam footage in the area, to contact them at Carlow Garda station on 059 913 6620 or the Garda Confidential Line on 1800 666 111.



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Bob Gibson, Hall of Fame Ace for Cardinals, Dies at 84



Hall of Famer Bob Gibson, the dominating St. Louis Cardinals pitcher who won a record seven consecutive World Series starts and set a modern standard for excellence when he finished the 1968 season with a 1.12 ERA, died Friday. He was 84.

The Cardinals confirmed Gibson’s death shortly after losing to San Diego 4-0 in the NL playoffs. Gibson had long been ill with pancreatic cancer in his hometown of Omaha, Nebraska.

Gibson’s death came on the 52nd anniversary of perhaps his most overpowering performance, when he struck out a World Series record 17 batters in Game 1 of the 1968 World Series against Detroit.

One of baseball’s most uncompromising competitors, the two-time Cy Young Award winner spent his entire 17-year career with St. Louis and was named the World Series MVP in their 1964 and ’67 championship seasons. The Cards came up just short in 1968, but Gibson was voted the National League’s MVP and shut down opponents so well that baseball changed the rules for fear it would happen again.

Gibson died less than a month after the death of a longtime teammate, Hall of Fame outfielder Lou Brock. Another pitching great from his era, Tom Seaver, died in late August.



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Ruth Bader Ginsburg, supreme court justice and champion of women’s rights, dies aged 87 – live | US news






Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg is dead, court announces

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First nurse in Ontario dies of COVID-19, province warns of new symptoms in kids


Ontario has lost its first nurse to COVID-19 and is amending the definition of the disease to include symptoms of a serious inflammatory syndrome that causes persistent fever and abdominal pain in children.

The registered nurse, Brian Beattie, worked at the Kensington Village long-term-care home in London, Ont. which declared an outbreak in early April and has lost five of its 78 residents to the highly contagious virus.

It’s not known how Beattie contracted the illness, which has also infected a handful of other staff at the home.

“He was the definition of dedication, and he considered his colleagues and residents to be his ‘other family,’” Ontario Nurses’ Association Vicki McKenna said Wednesday.

“While there will be much discussion about Ontario’s pandemic preparedness and protection of nurses and other health-care workers, this is not the time for speculation,” she added, noting the Ministry of Labour has been contacted to investigate the death.

More than 3,000 health-care workers, the majority of them in nursing homes, have contracted COVID-19, and several personal support workers have died from the illness. As of Tuesday, 180 nursing homes across the province were dealing with outbreaks.

Overall, the novel coronavirus has sickened more than 22,000 in Ontario since it first emerged here in late January and killed just over 1,800, including at least 1,239 long-term care residents.

Health Minister Christine Elliott said doctors are being advised to watch for a condition that is similar to Kawasaki Syndrome in children.

“Recent reports in Canada and internationally indicate that there may be an increase in multisystem inflammatory vasculitis, a rare but serious …illness that impacts children who have been diagnosed with COVID-19,” she said in a statement.

U.S. media have been reporting on this as an atypical presentation of the illness in children, which has appeared in a number of states.

Aside from the persistent fever and abdominal pain, symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and a rash.

“Parents should contact their health care providers immediately if their children are having these symptoms,” Elliott said, acting on the advice of chief medical officer Dr. David Williams.

While recent data suggests the majority of COVID-19 infections in children are mild, the province will begin tracking this new condition. The Ministry of Health said people under 19 account for five per cent of coronavirus cases and none are known to have died.

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Doctor who warned PM about need for more protective equipment for NHS workers dies from coronavirus


Doctor, 53, who warned Boris Johnson about ‘urgent’ need for more protective equipment for NHS workers dies from coronavirus after 15 day battle

  • Abdul Mabud Chowdhury died at Queens Hospital, Romford, after fighting virus
  • He told the PM health workers also needed ‘to live in this world disease free’ 
  • Family of Dr Chowdhury urged others to ‘please keep my brother in your prayers’

A doctor who warned Boris Johnson about the need for more personal protective equipment (PPE) for NHS workers has died from coronavirus. 

Abdul Mabud Chowdhury, 53, passed away in hospital after a 15-day battle against the virus. 

Just three weeks ago, he wrote to the Prime Minister, asking him to ‘urgently’ ensure PPE was available for ‘each and every NHS worker in the UK’.  

Abdul Mabud Chowdhury, 53, pictured left, passed away in hospital after a 15-day battle against the virus

Abdul Mabud Chowdhury, 53, pictured left, passed away in hospital after a 15-day battle against the virus

The Muslim Doctors Association said it was deeply saddened by the death of Dr Abdul Mabud Chowdhury, pictured right

The Muslim Doctors Association said it was deeply saddened by the death of Dr Abdul Mabud Chowdhury, pictured right

The doctor, pictured with his wife, worked as a Consultant Urologist at Homerton Hospital in east London

The doctor, pictured with his wife, worked as a Consultant Urologist at Homerton Hospital in east London

The doctor, known to friends and family as Faisal, worked as a consultant urologist in east London and leaves behind a wife and two children.

He died at 1am this morning at Queens Hospital in Romford, according to his brother, who wrote: ‘I ask you humbly my dear brothers and sisters to please keep my brother in your prayers.’ 

The Muslim Doctors Association paid tribute to him in a statement, which reads: ‘We are deeply saddened by the death of Dr Abdul Mabud Chowdhury, Consultant Urologist at Homerton Hospital, after fighting for his life from Covid-19.

‘He leaves behind his wife and two children. Our thoughts and prayers are with them.

‘Two weeks before his admission to hospital he wrote a message to the Prime Minister urging for better PPE.

‘May he rest in peace.’

In his letter to the PM, Dr Chowdhury wrote: ‘Please ensure urgently PPE for each and every NHS health worker in the UK. 

The family of the doctor, pictured left, urged people to 'please keep my brother in your prayers'

The family of the doctor, pictured left, urged people to ‘please keep my brother in your prayers’

Dr Chowdhury, pictured left, warned Boris Johnson children are at risk of being put off wanting to go to medical school in future

Dr Chowdhury, pictured left, warned Boris Johnson children are at risk of being put off wanting to go to medical school in future

The 53-year-old, pictured, died at 1am this morning at Queens Hospital in Romford, east London

The 53-year-old, pictured, died at 1am this morning at Queens Hospital in Romford, east London

‘Remember we may be doctors/nurses/HCAs/allied health workers who are in direct contact with patients, but we are also human beings to practice human rights like others, to live in this world disease free with our family and children.

‘People appreciate us and salute us for our rewarding job which are very inspirational but I would like to say, we have to protect ourselves and our families/kids in this global disaster/crisis by using appropriate PPE and remedies.

‘I hope we are by default entitled to get this minimal support for our safe medical practice.

‘Otherwise in future our children will lose interest to go to medical school.

‘We also should get first track facilities for coronavirus testing to help our patients to prevent the disease spreading.’



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Person under 18 dies of coronavirus in Los Angeles, health experts report



Los Angeles County on Tuesday confirmed four more deaths linked to the coronavirus, including the first of a person under the age of 18.

The number of deaths in the county from the virus is now 11. Tuesday’s update also included a previously reported death in Long Beach. The young person who died was from Lancaster. No further details were immediately available.

“This is a devastating reminder that COVID-19 affects people of all ages,” L.A. County Public Health Department director Barbara Ferrer said.

Two of the people who died were between the ages of 50 and 70. One had underlying health issues and resided in the West Adams neighborhood, health officials said.

Officials also confirmed an additional 128 cases of coronavirus infections, bringing the county’s total to 662. Of those positive cases, 42% occurred in individuals between the ages of 18 and 40, and 39% were in people ages 41 to 65.

At least 119 residents, or 18% of all positive cases in the county, have been hospitalized for the virus.

In Orange County, officials announced 27 new coronavirus cases, bringing the total to 152. There have not been any deaths linked to COVID-19.

San Mateo County saw a jump of 19 new cases and its second fatality, pushing the county’s overall total to 161 positive tests. The number of cases increased by more than 10% in one day, according to Preston Merchant, a public information officer working in the county’s joint information center.

The county’s second death occurred Monday at the Atria Senior Living facility in Burlingame. The facility received news of confirmed COVID-19 cases in their community on March 15. A number of residents tested positive for the virus, and Monday’s fatality was the senior facility’s first coronavirus-related death at its Burlingame location.

“Our thoughts are with their family during this difficult time,” Atria said in a statement. “We remain in close communication with all our residents and their families and continue to provide our support as we navigate this unprecedented situation together.”

Atria said it is working closely with the San Mateo County Health Department, and officials have been on site to confirm proper health and safety measures are in place.

The number of coronavirus cases in California surged to nearly 2,500 Tuesday afternoon and the death toll climbed to 50 as officials issued urgent warnings about the need for more hospital beds and equipment as medical facilities begin to fill up.

Gov. Gavin Newsom says he believes California will need 50,000 hospital beds for patients suffering from the illness caused by the coronavirus. That marks a significant increase from the 20,000 beds his administration forecast last week. The Democratic governor said the state’s 416 hospitals were doubling their “surge plans,” a move that will result in 30,000 new beds across the system.

San Francisco officials warned that a surge in coronavirus infections was expected to come within a week or two, and voiced dismay over images of the public crowding beaches and parks across California.

“The worst is yet to come,” said Dr. Grant Colfax, San Francisco’s director of public health, at a news conference Monday.

San Francisco has already taken steps to decompress the healthcare system — banning almost all visitors to hospitals and long-term-care facilities, canceling elective surgeries and routine medical visits, ordering that appointments be done by phone or video if possible, and opening up tents to care for patients who have mild symptoms in order to keep hospital beds free for those more seriously ill.

A steep rise in people being hospitalized with COVID-19 in Los Angeles County likely signals the approach of a wave of extremely sick patients that could overwhelm hospitals in the coming weeks, experts say.

As of March 6, five people in the county had been hospitalized at some point with COVID-19. Two weeks later, on Friday, that figure had jumped to 48. By Monday, the total had climbed to 90.

Though the raw numbers remain relatively low, the rate of increase has set many doctors and nurses on edge after watching the disease’s alarming trajectory in China, Italy and, most recently, New York City.

Two Cal State Long Beach students tested positive for the virus and were in self-isolation off campus, the university announced in an email to students Tuesday morning.

One student had not been on campus for two weeks, the university said. In the second case, public health officials determined there was no opportunity for on-campus exposure. Students who might have come into close contact with the patients were being notified by health officials, according to the email.

As the number of cases continues to rise, officials throughout the state kept up their call for an increase in testing capacity and reporting.

Frustrated public health directors in six Bay Area counties have ordered an assortment of commercial, university and pop-up testing sites that are screening residents for COVID-19 to begin reporting not just the positive cases, but the negative results too.

Dr. Sara Cody said testing remains woefully inadequate as Santa Clara County wrestles with mounting deaths. As of Tuesday, 16 people had died in the county, more than half of the virus fatalities in California.

Santa Clara County’s Sheriff’s Office confirmed four cases among staff, including a deputy who is self-isolating at home.

California requires labs and hospitals to report known cases of COVID-19, but not the number of negative tests. Cody said that information is critical to tracking the spread of the virus. She warned that Santa Clara County’s current critical situation is a window into what will be seen in San Francisco and other Bay Area communities in the next one to two weeks.

Contra Costa County is one of the six counties that ordered new requirements. On Friday, health officer Chris Farnitano said the county would issue an order for negative tests to be reported as well.

Meanwhile, California remains largely shut down under state and local orders. L.A. County officials have cracked down on nonessential businesses, which Sheriff Alex Villanueva declared Tuesday includes gun stores. If gun sellers don’t close their doors, he said, they will be cited and face penalty, including the loss of their business licenses.

Officials previously closed beach parking lots, parks and hiking trials amid concerns some people were not staying at least six feet apart while in public. Laguna Beach took the restrictions a step further and closed its beaches entirely on Monday.

On Tuesday, Los Angeles City Councilman David Ryu called for the closure of Runyon Canyon Park and Lake Hollywood Park on weekends.

“Making this request pains me greatly. I grew up in a two-bedroom apartment off the 101 Freeway, and our city’s parks were my only access to outdoor space,” Ryu said of his recommendation to Michael Shull, the general manager of the city’s Department of Recreation and Parks. “I don’t make this recommendation easily, but closing Runyon Canyon Park on weekends, when we have seen the highest volume of visitors, should follow to keep everyone safe.”

In Sonoma County, all parks and open spaces were closed indefinitely, public health officials announced this week.

The closure includes city, county, state and federal parklands and recreational lands operated by private groups and nonprofits, according to a news release.

“Closing parks is a difficult decision, but it is the right decision at this time,” Sundari Mase, the county’s interim health officer, said in a statement. “Allowing crowded conditions in parks is not in our best interest during this health crisis. The best action we can take is to stay close to home and limit our outdoor time to our yards and neighborhoods.”

Mase announced the closure Monday after too many visitors flocked to outdoor spaces over the weekend.

Criminal and civil trials were discontinued in California for at least two months after a sweeping order was issued late Monday by the state’s chief justice that aimed to sharply reduce public traffic in state courthouses.

Chief Justice Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye said in her order that court facilities were “ill-equipped to effectively allow the social distancing and other public health requirements” that had been imposed across California to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.

“Even if court facilities could allow for sufficient social distancing, the closure of schools means that many court employees, litigants, witnesses, and potential jurors cannot leave their homes to attend court proceedings because they must stay home to supervise their children,” Cantil-Sakauye said in the order.

The 60-day delay — which puts the courts in California’s 58 counties on a uniform trial delay schedule — came the same day that the presiding judge of Los Angeles County Superior Court, Kevin C. Brazile, blocked public access to county courthouses except for attorneys, staff, defendants and “authorized persons,” a vague category that includes news reporters. The clerk’s office will still be available to accept filings and assist people by phone or electronically.

The California National Guard on Monday provided details about how personnel would be deployed across the state to assist in coronavirus aid. Officials said the guard was being used purely for humanitarian purposes, such as distributing food and medical supplies as well as helping at food banks and working with officials on the Grand Princess cruise ship, which docked in California after an outbreak of the virus on board.

With the coronavirus pandemic further stifling the efforts of California and other states to issue Real ID licenses, President Trump on Monday said he would extend the Oct. 1 deadline for people to apply for the identification cards to board domestic flights in the United States.

Times staff writers Priscella Vega, Paige St. John and Luke Money contributed to this report.





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Man dies and his wife is in critical care after they ‘took fish tank cleaner to cure coronavirus’


Man who tried to treat himself with hydroxychloroquine DIES: Couple ate fish tank cleaner thinking it was the malaria drug that Trump is touting as a miracle coronavirus remedy

  • The couple, both in their 60s, were hospitalized after ingesting chloroquine phosphate, an additive often used at aquariums to clean fish tanks
  • The man died and his wife was left in critical condition as a result  
  • It’s believed that they confused the chemical with hydroxychloroquine, an antimalaria drug that’s shown promising results in treating coronavirus patients 
  • Banner Health, a non-profit hospital system based in Arizona, issued a statement about the shocking case on Monday 
  • In the statement experts warned the public against the use of inappropriate medications and household products to prevent or treat COVID-19  
  • President Trump drummed up excitement over hydroxychloroquine when he called the drug a ‘game changer’ last week
  • But the drug has not yet been proven as effective in treating coronavirus  
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

A man has died and his wife is under critical care after they ingested a chemical found commonly found in fish tank cleaner thinking it was the miracle coronavirus cure President Donald Trump touted at a press conference last week.  

Banner Health, a non-profit hospital system based in Arizona, issued a statement urging the public against the use of inappropriate medications and household products to prevent or treat COVID-19 on Monday. 

To emphasize the importance of the warning, officials disclosed a few details of what happened with an unnamed couple that ignored the advice and took their medical care into their own hands.  

The couple, both in their 60s, were rushed to the hospital about 30 minutes after ingesting chloroquine phosphate, according to the statement. 

It’s believed that they confused the chemical – an additive often used at aquariums to clean fish tanks – with hydroxychloroquine, an antimalaria drug that’s shown promising results in treating COVID-19 patients.  

President Donald Trump touted chloroquine as a 'miracle drug' at a press conference last week, but Dr Anthony Fauci, the White House coronavirus expert, quickly followed Trump's comments by saying more work was needed before it could be heralded as a solution

President Donald Trump touted chloroquine as a ‘miracle drug’ at a press conference last week, but Dr Anthony Fauci, the White House coronavirus expert, quickly followed Trump’s comments by saying more work was needed before it could be heralded as a solution

Dr Fauci (center) has not been at the White House coronavirus task force briefing for two days

Dr Fauci (center) has not been at the White House coronavirus task force briefing for two days

A man has died and his wife is under critical care after they ingested chloroquine phosphate, a chemical found commonly found in fish tank cleaner, thinking it was the miracle coronavirus cure President Donald Trump has been touting at his press conferences

A man has died and his wife is under critical care after they ingested chloroquine phosphate, a chemical found commonly found in fish tank cleaner, thinking it was the miracle coronavirus cure President Donald Trump has been touting at his press conferences

Banner Health experts emphasized that people should not take chloroquine under any circumstances unless it’s prescribed by a doctor.  

‘Given the uncertainty around COVID-19, we understand that people are trying to find new ways to prevent or treat this virus, but self-medicating is not the way to do so,’ said Dr Daniel Brooks, Banner Poison and Drug Information Center medical director. 

‘The last thing that we want right now is to inundate our emergency departments with patients who believe they found a vague and risky solution that could potentially jeopardize their health.’ 

Experts noted that the majority of people diagnosed with the novel coronavirus would recover without complications, and that  ‘the routine use of specific treatments, including medications described as “anti-COVID-19”, is not recommended for non-hospitalized patients’.  

‘We are strongly urging the medical community to not prescribe this medication to any non-hospitalized patients,’ Brooks said. 

The statement did not say whether the couple who ingested chloroquine phosphate had been diagnosed with COVID-19 prior to doing so. 

As of Monday there are nearly 42,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in the US and 576 deaths

As of Monday there are nearly 42,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in the US and 576 deaths

New York state officials are expected to begin trials with hydroxychloroquine on Tuesday, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced at a press conference Monday (pictured)

New York state officials are expected to begin trials with hydroxychloroquine on Tuesday, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced at a press conference Monday (pictured)

Hydroxychloroquine has not yet been proven as effective in battling COVID-19, but President Trump drummed up excitement over it when he called it a ‘game changer’ last week. 

Dr Anthony Fauci, the White House coronavirus expert, quickly followed Trump’s comments by saying more work was needed before it could be heralded as a solution.  

New York state officials are expected to begin trials with the medication on Tuesday, according to Governor Andrew Cuomo.  

Meanwhile, many people across the US have praised the drug and credited it with saving their lives – albeit after they were prescribed it by doctors.  





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Baby with heart condition dies from mould exposure at hospital after open heart surgery



A baby with a serious heart condition has died after she received an infection from mould in a Seattle hospital’s operating room, her mother says. 

Elizabeth Hutt was born with a heart condition that she battled for the entirety of her six-month-long life. The young child underwent three open heart surgeries, and after the third one is when it’s believed she contracted an Aspergillus mould infection in the hospital’s operating room. 

Her mother, Katha Hutt, revealed in a Facebook post her daughter died early Wednesday morning at Seattle Children’s Hospital. 


“Elizabeth Vera Hutt gained her wings on her 175th day of life at 4:40 am. Late last night, Beth told us she was ready,” Mrs. Hutt wrote. 

“I cannot begin to express the gratitude we have for the team that worked through the night to make sure Beth’s transition was as painless and smooth as possible. We will post when we’ve had the chance to make plans for celebrating our brave, courageous, beautiful warrior.”

The mould in the hospital’s operating rooms was first detected in November, around the same time as the child’s third surgery. 

Ms Hutt created a Facebook page titled Beth’s HLHS Journey to keep people updated on her daughter’s condition throughout her surgeries. She revealed in January her daughter was battling an infection that stumped her doctors. 

It was later determined the infection was contracted from the mould discovered in three of the 14 operating rooms at the hospital in November. The mould came from the hospital’s air-handling units in the operating rooms, and 14 patients have developed infections from the mould since 2001, the hospital revealed. Seven of those 14 children have since died from their infections. 

“I’m always going to wonder if there were different interventions that could’ve taken place, had the Aspergillus not been there,” Ms Hutt said.

Aspergillus is a common mould typically present in the air that people breathe. It normally does not cause one to get sick, but it can be harmful to people who lack strong immune systems or those who are surgical patients. 

Ms Hutt and her husband, Micah Hutt, told WBTV they knew about the hospital’s Aspergillus problems in 2018, but they still picked the location for their daughter due to the quality of doctors and medical staff at the facility. 

At the time, the parents thought the mould problem was solved. 

They joined a class action suit against Seattle Children’s Hospital in January, which alleges facility managers knew about the mould since 2005 and failed to fix the problem. 

The hospital currently has 11 of its 14 operating rooms shut down, as new HEPA filtration units are installed. The other three operating rooms received the new air units and are open for use. 

Seattle Children’s Hospital said in response to the baby’s death: “Losing a child is incredibly devastating for everyone whose lives were touched by that child. Our deepest condolences go out to families and loved ones who have experienced a loss.”



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Daniel Arap Moi, Kenya’s Longtime Strongman, Dies At 95 : NPR


President of Kenya Daniel arap Moi, shown in a photo from 2002. Moi has died at 95.

Sayyid Abdul Azim/AP


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President of Kenya Daniel arap Moi, shown in a photo from 2002. Moi has died at 95.

Sayyid Abdul Azim/AP

Daniel Arap Moi, who ruled Kenya for nearly a quarter century marked by repression and widespread corruption before he eventually yielded to multiparty democracy and allowed a peaceful transfer of power, has died at age 95.

His death was announced by current President Uhuru Kenyatta, the son of the country’s founding father and first president, Jomo Kenyatta, whose death in office in 1978 paved the way for Moi’s rise.

“Our nation and our continent were immensely blessed by the dedication and service of the Late Mzee Moi; who spent almost his entire adult life serving Kenya and Africa,” Kenyatta said in a statement, using a Swahili term of respect.

Kenyatta announced that flags would be flown at half staff until Moi’s funeral.

“Daniel Toroitich arap Moi ran a good race, kept the faith, and now he is enjoying his reward in heaven,” he said.

There was no immediate word on the cause of death, but Moi had reportedly been in and out of the hospital in recent months with breathing difficulties.

Moi, a school teacher-turned-politician, served as home affairs minister before being appointed vice president in 1967.

After assuming the presidency in 1978, he soon dominated not only politics, but all aspects of Kenyan life.

He was a retail politician, who sought support by doling out favors to supporters. Moi’s ubiquitous ivory walking stick became a symbol of his one-man rule. Despite his intolerance of dissent, he long remained popular.

Inexperienced when he assumed the presidency, Moi became increasingly authoritarian as he found his feet in office. In 1982, his government pushed through a constitutional amendment that essentially legitimized one-party rule. And after a failed coup against him that same year, he sought to repress critics.

In 1987, London-based Amnesty International accused Moi’s government of a “deliberate program to silence or intimidate its political opponents.”

However, by the early 1990s, Moi had acquiesced to international pressure and begun to loosen his grip, allowing multiparty elections. Even so, the ruling Kenya African National Union (KANU) often ran unopposed and when challenged, was able to manipulate a disorganized opposition. Election violence and vote rigging were common.

Although a leading recipient of Western aid, Kenya under Moi fell ever-deeper into economic stagnation, with low or negative growth and periods of steep inflation. As corruption progressively ate away at Kenya’s economy, Moi sought to use the West – and even Asia — as a scapegoat for the country’s troubles.

By 2002, an aging Moi agreed to step down ahead of elections. In his last speech as president, he reiterated one of his frequent themes, warning against ethnic conflict, which he called “a cancer that has destroyed many nations in Africa.”

Musalia Mudavadi, who was Moi’s deputy, tells NPR that the long-time leader’s legacy should be his peaceful transfer of power. “To me, that is a tribute that we must never forget,” he said.

But another legacy is just as salient — and perhaps more enduring. After Moi relinquished the presidency, subsequent investigations documented torture cells at Nyayo House in Nairobi, where his political opponents were imprisoned, beaten and killed.

Speaking in October, Kenyan lawyer Miguna Miguna said Moi was “among the world’s most brutal tyrants.”

“He detained real and imagined critics without trial,” Miguna said.



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