Posted on

Russia deploys chemical defense troops to Italy – Defence Blog


Russia reportedly is deploying its Troops of Radiological, Chemical and Biological Defence or RChB Defense to Italy.

Russia has loaded nine Il-76 cargo planes that flew to Italy, with eight mobile medical teams, medical equipment and aerosol disinfection trucks. Moscow also sent about 100 military specialists in virology and epidemics, one special military laboratory and 20 mobile disinfection vehicles.

Mobile complexes with equipment for diagnosis and disinfection were delivered to the Italian Air Force Practitioner de Mare airbase, located 30 kilometers south-west of Rome, Russia’s Defense Ministry said in a statement.

In photos released by Russian Defense Ministry Press Service, the doors of military trucks bore signs with heart-shaped Russian and Italian flags that read: “From Russia with love” in Russian, Italian and English.

Putin spoke to Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte on Saturday, the Kremlin said, saying the Russian leader had offered his support and help in the form of mobile disinfection vehicles and specialists to help the worst hit Italian regions.

Italy recorded a jump in deaths from coronavirus of almost 800 on Saturday, taking the toll in the world’s hardest-hit country to almost 5,000.

 

* If you wish to report grammatical or factual errors within our news articles, you can let us know by using the online feedback form.



Source link

Posted on

Pentagon abandons plans to buy more Israeli missile defense systems – Defence Blog


The U.S. Department of Defense abandons plans to buy Israeli-made missile defense systems due to cyber vulnerabilities and other problems. according to The Times of Israel.

The Israel-based, English-language online newspaper has reported that U.S. military curbing its plans to adopt the Iron Dome missile defense system due to concerns about its compatibility with existing US technologies, scrapping its plans to buy two more batteries.

A central problem was Israel’s refusal to provide the U.S. military with Iron Dome’s source code, hampering the Americans’ ability to integrate the system into their air defenses.

Gen. Mike Murray, head of Army Futures Command, said the service identified a number of problems — including cyber vulnerabilities and operational challenges — during efforts last year to integrate elements of Iron Dome with the US Army’s Integrated Battle Command System.

“It took us longer to acquire those [first] two batteries than we would have liked,” Murray told the House Armed Service tactical air and land forces subcommittee on Thursday. “We believe we cannot integrate them into our air defense system based on some interoperability challenges, some cyber challenges and some other challenges.”

Last year, U.S.’s military magazine, Defense News, quoting the deputy in charge of the service’s air and missile defense modernization efforts, has announced that the contract to purchase two Iron Dome batteries for the U.S. Army’s interim cruise missile defense capability has been finalized.

“Now that the contract is set in stone, the Army will be able to figure out delivery schedules and details in terms of taking receipt of the systems,” Daryl Youngman told Defense News at the Space and Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, on Aug. 8.

The Iron Dome is the world’s most-used system, intercepting more than 1,900 incoming targets with a success rate exceeding 90 percent since being fielded in 2011.

Iron Domedetects, assesses and intercepts a variety of shorter-range targets such as rockets, artillery and mortars. It is effective day or night and in all weather conditions including low clouds, rain, dust storms and fog. It features a first-of-its-kind multi-mission launcher designed to fire a variety of interceptor missiles.

The system can protect deployed and maneuvering forces, as well as the Forward Operating Base (FOB) and urban areas, against a wide range of indirect and aerial threats.

* If you wish to report grammatical or factual errors within our news articles, you can let us know by using the online feedback form.



Source link

Posted on

Export of Turkey’s defense industry products to Kyrgyzstan up (Exclusive)


28 November 2019 16:50 (UTC+04:00)

Access to paid information is limited

News on the website Trend.az marked as , is available ONLY to subscribers of TREND International News Agency.

The username or password you entered is incorrect.

User with this login is already authorized in the electronic system of TREND

If you are a subscriber of TREND News Agency, enter your login and password:

azericard

Subscription Information

To subscribe to the publication TREND, getting paid access to the news agency, advertising and purchasing photos, please contact us:

Phone: (+994 12) 437-12-68
E-mail: [email protected]

To subscribe to the products of Trend, you can also send an email to [email protected], or by filling the form below you will receive full information from sales managers to enter a paid subscription:





Source link

Posted on

Defense Secretary Says Trump Ordered Him To Let Eddie Gallagher Retire As Navy SEAL : NPR


U.S. Secretary for Defense Mark Esper, pictured in October, told reporters at the Pentagon on Monday that President Trump ordered him to ensure Eddie Gallagher retained his Trident pin.

Virginia Mayo/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Virginia Mayo/AP

U.S. Secretary for Defense Mark Esper, pictured in October, told reporters at the Pentagon on Monday that President Trump ordered him to ensure Eddie Gallagher retained his Trident pin.

Virginia Mayo/AP

President Trump has repeatedly intervened on behalf of the Navy SEAL recently convicted of misconduct. And Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Trump did it again over the weekend, directly ordering him to allow Chief Petty Officer Eddie Gallagher to retire as a SEAL.

“I spoke with the President on Sunday. He gave me the order that Eddie Gallagher will retain his Trident pin,” Esper told reporters Monday at the Pentagon, referring to the insignia designating Gallagher as a member of the elite commando force.

The order from the commander in chief effectively put an end to proceedings by a Trident Review Board called by the commander of Navy Special Warfare, Rear Adm. Collin Green. The panel was charged with deciding whether Gallagher and three of his supervising officers were fit for duty. In Gallagher’s case, the board was set to convene next week.

On Monday, Esper also reiterated his reasons for asking Navy Secretary Richard Spencer to tender his resignation on Sunday. He accused Spencer of circumventing the appropriate channels, including Esper himself, to engage in direct negotiations with the White House to allow Gallagher to remain a SEAL. Meanwhile, Spencer was saying publicly that the Trident Review Board process should be allowed to play out.

“This proposal was completely contrary to what we agreed to, and contrary to Secretary Spencer’s public position,” Esper said, adding that he was “completely caught off-guard by this information, and realized that it had undermined everything we had been discussing with the president.”

Esper tried to undo the perception that Spencer’s dismissal was tied to the specifics of Gallagher’s case, saying instead that it was over the chain of command.

The standoff between the commander in chief and the Navy’s top brass began even before Gallagher’s court-martial trial over the summer. Gallagher, who served multiple tours in Iraq, was accused of a slew of crimes, including the murder of a wounded Islamic State prisoner. In the end, he was acquitted of all but one charge, posing with a dead detainee. Part of his sentence included a demotion to a lower rank of petty officer first class.

Trump subsequently overturned that decision, commanding the Navy to promote Gallagher back to chief petty officer.

Rear Adm. Green’s decision to initiate a review of Gallagher’s fitness as a SEAL was seen as a rebuke of the president’s order.

In his resignation letter, Spencer suggested that his dismissal was indeed connected to Gallagher’s review rather than any communication back-channels.

“Unfortunately it has become apparent that in this respect, I no longer share the same understanding with the Commander in Chief who appointed me, in regards to the key principle of good order and discipline,” Spencer wrote. “I cannot in good conscience obey an order that I believe violates the sacred oath I took in the presence of my family, my flag and my faith to support and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

On Sunday, Trump also linked Spencer’s ouster to Gallagher. “I was not pleased with the way that Navy Seal Eddie Gallagher’s trial was handled by the Navy. He was treated very badly but, despite this, was completely exonerated on all major charges. I then restored Eddie’s rank,” the president tweeted.

Then he introduced another reason for pushing Spencer out: “Large cost overruns from past administration’s…..contracting procedures were not addressed to my satisfaction.”

The president added that he would nominate Kenneth Braithwaite as the next Navy secretary. “A man of great achievement and success, I know Ken will do an outstanding job!” Trump said.

Gallagher’s attorney, Timothy Parlatore, told the Navy Times that neither he nor his client foresaw such fallout. “With this personnel change, this institution will improve and no one will go through the ordeal Eddie went through. At the end of the day, the most important duty any of us have is protecting America,” Parlatore said.

“This case is completely bananas,” he added.

Gallagher said he is “overjoyed” that the president stepped in on his behalf once again. In an interview on Fox & Friends that aired Sunday morning, Gallagher name-checked Green and Spencer.

“This is all about ego and retaliation. This has nothing to do with good order and discipline. They could have taken my Trident at any time they wanted. Now they’re trying to take it after the president restored my rank,” Gallagher said.

It is unclear where the events of the last few days leave the Trident Review Board proceedings for Gallagher’s three supervising officers: Lt. Jacob Portier, Lt. Cmdr. Robert Breisch and Lt. Thomas MacNeil.





Source link

Posted on

U.S. defense secretary fires Navy chief over handling of SEAL saga


WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper fired the Navy’s top civilian after losing confidence in him over his handling of the high-profile case of a Navy SEAL convicted of battlefield misconduct in Iraq, the Pentagon said on Sunday.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper delivers remarks before ringing the closing NASDAQ bell for Veterans Day in New York, New York, November 11, 2019. DoD/Lisa Ferdinando/Handout via REUTERS

Esper also determined that the sailor in question, Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, should be allowed to retain his Trident pin designating him as a SEAL – effectively ending the Navy’s efforts to carry out a peer review that could have led to his ouster from the elite force.

President Donald Trump had publicly opposed taking away Gallagher’s Trident pin. Trump had already intervened in Gallagher’s case earlier this month, using his authority to restore the decorated officer’s rank and pay and allow him to retire later this year on a full pension.

Navy Secretary Richard Spencer made headlines last week for suggesting a possible split with Trump by saying Gallagher should face a peer review board.

But Pentagon spokesman Jonathan Hoffman said Spencer also had a private line of communications with the White House.

“Secretary Spencer had previously and privately proposed to the White House – contrary to Spencer’s public position – to restore Gallagher’s rank and allow him to retire with his Trident pin,” Hoffman said.

Spencer never informed Esper of his private proposal, Hoffman said.

Esper decided to ask for Spencer’s resignation after “losing trust and confidence in him regarding his lack of candor over conversations with the White House,” Hoffman said.

Gallagher, 40, was demoted in rank and pay grade after being convicted by a military jury in July of illegally posing for pictures with the corpse of an Islamic State fighter.

On Nov. 15, the White House said in a statement that Trump had restored Gallagher’s rank and had pardoned two Army officers accused of war crimes in Afghanistan. Critics had said such actions would undermine military justice and send a message that battlefield atrocities will be tolerated.

In an appearance on Fox News Channel on Sunday, Gallagher indicated that he hoped to retire next Saturday, “without the board” convening to decide whether he could continue to be a SEAL, considered among the most elite of U.S. fighting forces.

Reporting by Phil Stewart, Patricia Zengerle and Howard Schneider; Editing by Sonya Hepinstall and Peter Cooney

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.



Source link