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‘Tough Day for Twitter:’ Users React to Massive Platform Security Breach



Following the recent hijacking of multiple high-profile Twitter accounts, users on the platform have begun to analyze the cyber attack and the effects it may have on the platform’s future.

Twitter recently faced a major security breach as the accounts of multiple high-profile individuals and companies were hijacked, including Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, Former President Barack Obama, Tesla CEO Elon Musk, Microsoft founder Bill Gates, and the official accounts of ride-sharing service Uber and tech giant Apple.

Now, many individuals from multiple fields are reacting to the news that major accounts were apparently easily hijacked in the space of a few hours, and how the platform could prevent such an attack again in the future.

Motherboard reporter Jason Koebler tweeted that photos of internal Twitter tools shared with Motherboard by sources claiming to have knowledge of the hack are being removed from Twitter for containing “personal information,” despite the screenshots simply showing an internal Twitter dashboard with no identifying info.

Many across Twitter have begun to worry about the impact of the hack, game developer Mark Kern best known for working as a team lead on the popular game World of Warcraft tweeted that the hack could have “some really, really, big impacts.”

Journalist and eSports commentator Richard Lewis claimed in a twee that the leaked internal tools prove that the company lied to Congress about the types of tools they had in place, this likely refers to what appears to be “blacklisting” options for accounts in Twitter’s internal tools. Dorsey and his staff have long claimed that the act of “shadowbanning” or preventing users’ tweets from being seen is a conspiracy theory.

Journalist Tim Pool came to a similar conclusion, stating that blacklisting options are clearly labeled in the leaked internal screenshots:

Kim Dotcom, the German-Finnish Internet entrepreneur and founder of the file-sharing website Megaupload.com who is fighting 2012 charges of copyright infringement and money laundering related to the site, commented that the hack has revealed that evidence from social media is no longer reliable in Court as it can be edited by Twitter employees or anyone with access to Twitter’s internal tools.

The account of the cryptocurrency wallet MyCrypto posted a number of tweets outlining when certain accounts posted tweets containing links to Bitcoin donation scams and the Bitcoin addresses linked to the scam.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted that it was a “tough day” at the company following the events of the hack:

Many made light of the situation including British television host Piers Morgan who tweeted that he would not be tweeting “Bitcoin advice”:

Breitbart News will continue to follow this story and update readers on the latest events as more information comes to light.

Lucas Nolan is a reporter for Breitbart News covering issues of free speech and online censorship. Follow him on Twitter @LucasNolan or contact via secure email at the address [email protected]





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#ICYMI: Heat wave, CHSLDs probe, day camps, more


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While the Quebec government recently announced day camps can open on June 22, soccer camps are still waiting to hear from public health officials on exactly how they’ll be allowed to proceed. Read more here.

Day camps say they need help

Day camps have been given the green light to open this summer, but many popular Montreal camps say they need government funding to cover increased salary costs. Read more here.

West Island day camps

What about day camps in the West Island? It’s a mixed bag of decisions. Read more here.

NHL unveils playoff plan

The National Hockey League will go straight into an expanded 24-team playoff format and all games will be held in two hub cities if action resumes this year amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Commissioner Gary Bettman said on Tuesday. Read more here.

Habs in playoffs without Romanov

Russian defenceman Alexander Romanov won’t be in the Canadiens’ lineup when they face the Pittsburgh Penguins in the first round of the 2020 NHL playoffs this summer. Read more here.

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VE Day: Berlin marks end of WW2 with unprecedented holiday


A sign reading 8 May hangs on the German-Russian Museum in BerlinImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Friday is a one-off holiday that will only be marked in Berlin

Berliners have been given an unprecedented public holiday on Friday, to mark the end of World War Two but also liberation from Nazi rule.

Not since reunification has a German city acknowledged 8 May as a day of liberation in this way; some Berliners are unaware of its significances.

A street party and several events have been cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The holiday is one-off and is not being held outside Berlin.

But there are growing calls for a public holiday to be held across Germany.

What does 8 May mean for Germans?

For some, particularly in areas of the old West Germany, 8 May has long been associated with defeat in World War Two. Many families preferred to draw a veil over the period, both those who had suffered persecution as well as those who hadn’t.

In the areas of the old communist East Germany, 8 May was taught as a “Day of Liberation” from the Nazi regime by the victorious Red Army. Post-war Berlin itself was divided into four sectors – the Soviets in the east and the US, French and British in the west.

Image caption

Berlin was a divided city for decades

In the latter years of the West German state, the date was also seen as marking liberation from the Nazi regime.

In 1985 President Richard von Weizsäcker made clear the day should be seen as a day of liberation and not defeat. Ten years later, on the 50th anniversary of liberation, a reunified Berlin was at the centre of a state ceremony.

Nowadays the date is viewed more significantly as the rebirth of democracy.

But the only national public holiday currently marking German history is 3 October, which celebrates the date of reunification in 1990.

Why now?

“It’s the principles of democracy that we want to get across,” explains Moritz van Dülmen, whose Kulturprojekte is behind a number of events.

Image copyright
Kulturprojekte

Image caption

A campaign highlights how voters should not allow democracy to be overthrown: “At the beginning was the vote – a vote and its result”

Although many of the plans for Berlin’s public holiday have been scrapped, including a street party, an open air exhibition and numerous events at museums, some projects will still take place online.

Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Frank-Walter Steinmeier will lay wreaths at Berlin’s memorial for victims of war and tyranny.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Queen Elizabeth II laid a wreath at the German memorial for victims of war and dictatorship in 2004

“We are also keen to reach a young audience, particularly those with a migrant background, who have little knowledge of German history,” Mr van Dülmen explains.

Remembering history, he argues, is more important than ever in light of recent deadly far-right attacks at a synagogue in the eastern city of Halle and a shisha bar at Hanau near Frankfurt.

Is the idea popular?

Talk to Berliners and many will not see the significance of 8 May as the end of the war, or even the surrender of Nazi Germany. Many only found out this week that Friday was a public holiday.

Hannelore Steer, who grew up in East Germany, sees the holiday as a good idea as she was used to seeing it celebrated many years ago.

  • Fall of Berlin Wall was ‘worst night of my life’
  • ‘Cut the Iron Curtain’: Germany’s 1989 freedom picnic

Weng Yuen believes it would help people remember what had happened. “17 June used to be a public holiday in West Germany to remind us of the uprising in East Germany in 1953. That’s now largely forgotten particularly with a younger generation,” she told the BBC.

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Media captionThe punk rocker who took on the East German Stasi

Berliner Tina Michael, who has two teenage sons, says that’s important as the history curriculum has recently been cut in German schools.

“As history and geography classes have been merged, a lot of material can’t be covered any more,” she complains.

Friday’s holiday has also been a subject for political debate.

Holocaust survivor Esther Bejarano, 95, wrote an open letter to Mrs Merkel and President Steinmeier calling for 8 May to become a lasting and nationwide public holiday.

She believes it could help Germans appreciate that 8 May 1945 was “a day of liberation and the crushing of the National Socialist regime”. One hundred thousand people have signed a petition supporting the proposal.

Politicians including Katrin Göring-Eckardt from the Greens and Katja Kipping of the left-wing Linke party have backed her proposal. It was Die Linke that lobbied for the day to become a public holiday in Berlin.

Not everyone backs the idea. The far-right AfD party, which is the biggest opposition force in Germany’s Bundestag, is bitterly opposed to the holiday.

  • Just how far to the right is AfD?
  • How far right caused earthquake in German politics

Co-leader Alexander Gauland sees 8 May as an “ambivalent” date, because while it may have meant liberation for some, it also represents the “absolute defeat” of Germany and the “loss of big parts of Germany”.

The day is being widely covered by German media, in an attempt to portray the broad array of experiences that Germans had as the war came to an end.



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International Dawn Chorus Day celebrated amid lockdown – Channel 4 News


It has become a soundtrack to lockdown: not the wailing sirens or the helicopters overhead – but the melody of birdsong at sunrise, now sounding clearer than it has been for decades, in a world that has ground to a halt.

Today, the first Sunday in May, the height of spring – marks International Dawn Chorus Day – the sound of birdsong giving people around the world some distraction from the stress and anxiety of lockdown – and a reminder to many that life does and will go on.



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Our Collective Mission on Groundhog Day


This expert-driven national-security insight can’t be generated for free.  We invite you to support quality content by becoming a  Cipher Brief Level I Member .  Joining this experienced security-focused community is only $10/month (for an annual $120/yr membership). It’s a great and inexpensive way to stay ahead of the national and global security issues that impact you the most.

 

 

The post Our Collective Mission on Groundhog Day appeared first on The Cipher Brief.



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The Day After (II): What Europe?



“The Day After” for the European Union, the so-called “bloc”, will either have to stay as is and sooner, rather later, dissolve. Or it will have to change in an attempt to survive. This will be difficult as huge organisations like the EU do not historically adapt, but disappear. And yet, the instinct for survival is very strong, and the bloc may radically adapt to the “new norm” because if it doesn’t, its servants will not lose a little, but all.

Maintaining the “status quo ante”

The bloc may stay as-is – an apolitical power structure, ruling half a billion people by a self-reproduced, non-accountable administrative machine, without any democratic legitimisation.

This is the same bloc from which the United Kingdom withdrew and is the EU which ordinary citizens left behind when they entered into house isolation last month. If this will be the bloc that re-surfaces once Europe’s residents are released, it will continue living in its own world, further distancing itself from its own citizens and soon will collapse.

After returning to society, ordinary people will be different. If the Brussels nomenklatura remains the same, it will face a problem, a big problem. Most people after the long home detention will be different. Most, at least for a while, will be better people because they would have spent time with themselves and their families and would have discovered that moderation is a virtue, while forced minimalism, once they are used to it, gives a different dimension to life.

As for the European Union, the inmates who spent day and night in front of a screen sensed that the EU had no political role in the crisis. The bloc has been judged by its citizens as having been “in absentia”.

Indeed, Viktor Orban dissolved the Hungarian Parliament in an unprecedented “coup d’état” and Brussels ignored it, displaying no political capacity to handle the situation.

Dad, is America far away? Shoot-up and swim…

Leaders emerge from confrontations, and the virus crisis is the world biggest confrontation since the Second World War. Whether it’s a confrontation between China and the Western World or between humankind and nature, makes no difference. In any instance, new leaders will emerge. This is typical after large events. Think of what great leaders Europe had after World War II and during the Cold War – Francoise Mitterrand, Helmut Kohl, Aldo Moro, Margaret Thatcher and many others who were followed by mediocracies in the years of peace.

The emergence of new leaders is now in the making. In this process, the bloc does not participate as the Brussels bureaucracy although it is the most sophisticated administrative machine of the world. It is politically sterile. It is composed of civil servants and only civil servants who, in the absence of political leaders, began making political decisions. That is what undermined the European project.

In the emerging post-crisis new world, the European Union is needed more than ever, ironically, for the same reasons it was established seven decades ago – to unite Europeans and contain Germany. At that time it was to guarantee that Berlin didn’t dominate Europe again with its Panzers, and today it’s to be sure Germany doesn’t attempt to dominate Europe again with its Deutsche Mark, which masquerades as the euro.

Maintaining and strengthening the European Union, turning it into a united nation that is citizen useful and friendly, is the only way to keep alive the best European achievement of all time.

This will be a difficult task. The European Commission, the presumed government of Europe, must attempt it. It is hard to do so as it must give up all privileges its employees have accumulated and turn them into ordinary civil servants.

Once the bloc’s civil servants realise that if the union disintegrates, their pensions will be paid (if they will be paid) by their own countries of origin and will be at the level of national pensions, they will certainly behave.

The change we need

There are some ideas about the changes the bloc needs to make in order to survive. The most important change is the “presumed government of Europe” must become “the government of Europe” and must become political.

Europe has serious survival problems to address, more than ever, and they are all political. They require political solutions that no administration can give no matter how good it is and how well it is paid. That is why the government of the bloc must become political, democratic, accountable, and at the service of citizens.

“The Day After” sequel of New Europe will provide food for thought to all those pretending they rule Europe from their couch but have a better sense than anybody else about the threats to their jobs and pensions when everything will return to the “new normal”.

In the next episodes, we will provide some ideas as to how the European Commission should change in an attempt to survive. How to make the bloc political; how to bring the Directors General down to earth at the service of the political personnel; how to restore accountability; how to reduce over-regulation; how to restore transparency especially in money matters; how to redefine the role of the cabinets and other unpleasant suggestions, yet essential for the survival of the Union, in the post virus era.

(to be continued)

Related Articles:

The Day After: a new Yalta in the making



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Ontario boosting COVID-19 capacity to test almost 20,000 people a day by mid-April


Ontario plans to be able to run 5,000 COVID-19 tests a day by the end of this week and aims to perform almost 20,000 tests a day by April 17, provincial health officials say.

That’s a big step up from the roughly 2,500 tests Ontario has been processing each day. This is all part of a plan to both clear a massive testing backlog and to prepare for the expected strain on the system as the pandemic spreads in the province.

“In Ontario we have taken immediate and important steps to increase our provincial testing capacity,” said Helen Angus, Ontario’s deputy health minister and chair of the COVID-19 Command Table. She said partnerships with hospital and community laboratories will help ramp up capacity. By April 17, Angus said labs across Ontario will be performing 18,900 tests a day.

Instead of the majority of COVID-19 swab samples going to the provincial lab — as they now do — samples will be sent to private and hospital labs that have the capacity, starting immediately. Other geographical areas in the province, particularly the North, will have added capacity under the new plan.

Despite that increased capacity, there are no plans to test everyone who is sick.

“It is not feasible and it is not desirable,” said Dr. Barbara Yaffe, Ontario’s deputy chief medical officer of health. “I know people are worried and there is a lot of fear and concern out there and somehow getting a test result could make you feel better, but it may give you a false sense of security.”

Ontario is prioritizing health-care workers and others who by the nature of their job or where they live (residents and workers in nursing homes and homeless shelters as an example) are at risk of infection, and also the very sick who are hospitalized with severe respiratory symptoms. Others are encouraged to stay home, self-isolate, and if they develop severe respiratory symptoms, chest pains or extreme lethargy go to a hospital emergency.

And not everyone at the site of an outbreak needs to be tested, officials said. Using long-term-care facilities as an example, health officials who briefed the media Thursday said that if three people on a nursing home floor test positive, and others are sick on that floor, there is no need to test them as they are presumed to have the virus and will be treated as if they do.

As of Thursday morning, Ontario had increased its daily testing capacity to 2,439, although officials overstated that during the briefing, saying Ontario was currently at “3,000 to 4,000 tests a day.” Provincial data showed that as of Thursday morning the testing backlog — number of samples taken but not processed — was 10,965, a number that has been steadily growing but with a slower growth rate in the past few days.

Scientists are learning with each day’s experience. Officials at the briefing said the testing protocol and testing sensitivity has grown as scientists in Canada and around the world learn more and more about the novel coronavirus. “Lab tests are now so sensitive that even the smallest trace of COVID-19 can be detected,” Angus said.

Starting Thursday, Ontario is reallocating COVID-19 tests that would normally have been done at the Public Health Ontario laboratories to hospital and private labs. Angus said Ontario has had strong response from private labs that want to help out.

Officials reiterated Thursday that Ontario continues to prioritize health-care workers, people in long-term-care facilities and homeless shelters, patients hospitalized with severe respiratory symptoms, and people in “remote First Nations reserves,” and returning travellers with symptoms.

“We recognize that not everybody at this point can be tested quickly and not everybody really needs to be tested in terms of the clinical treatment they would get,” said Yaffe, the associate chief medical officer of health.

“The ones we are prioritizing are where there is an impact on a lot of other vulnerable people and so the result needs to be done quickly,” Yaffe said.

As to how many the province is missing due to this testing protocol, Yaffe said they do not know. “Many, many thousands of people” have used the province’s online assessment tool, she said.

“As we expand the number of tests we will have a better sense of the prevalence in the population,” said deputy health minister Angus.

Officials said doctors still have leeway to determine who will be tested, along with the provincial priorities.

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Matt Andersen, president and CEO of Ontario Health, said the province estimates it can add 4,000 additional completed tests each week, growing to a capacity of close to 20,000 by the middle of April.

A big concern provincial health officials have is Ontario residents returning from winter vacations. “There’s real concern about the snowbirds coming back and make sure we are looking at them and pulling out all the stops to get them to stay home” and self-isolate, said Angus.

Kevin Donovan





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No luck for the Irish as closed U.S. pubs face coronavirus losses on St. Patrick’s Day


NEW YORK/BOSTON (Reuters) – Orla Sweeney, manager of Connolly’s Irish pub in New York City, expected St. Patrick’s Day to once again be one of her bar’s most profitable days of the year.

A sign is seen on the window at McSorley’s Old Ale House, which, established in 1854, is referred to as New York City’s oldest Irish saloon and was ordered to close at 8:00pm as part of a city-wide order to close bars and restaurants in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus the day before Saint Patrick’s Day in Manhattan, New York City, New York, U.S., March 16, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Instead, the pub near Times Square was shuttered on Tuesday, like hundreds of thousands of dining establishments across the United States as state governments enforced closures to control the spread of COVID-19. Sweeney broke the news to her employees on Monday after Governor Andrew Cuomo ordered all restaurants to close that night, and they broke down in tears.

“They were like, ‘Well when can I come back to work?’ And I’m like, I’m not really sure,” Sweeney said. “In this industry, they live week to week, day to day, and right now they have nothing.”

There should have been corned beef, bagpipe music and parades, but the streets of major U.S. cities on Tuesday were mostly desolate as local authorities banned parades in cities from New York to San Francisco to slow the spread of the virus that has infected more than 4,400 Americans and killed at least 80.

Even in the holiday’s native country of Ireland, the government on Sunday ordered all pubs to shut down after videos of crowded pubs in Dublin ignited a social media uproar over the possibility of contagion.

Some persistent revelers took their festivities to social media, sharing videos of Irish step dancing on Twitter and posting photos of themselves holding beers in self-quarantine.

A few dozen members of the New York City St. Patrick’s Day Parade organizing committee donned green and marched with an American flag and bagpipes, following city guidelines to cap gatherings at 50 people.

One Boston Irish musician, Geoff Roman, had been slated to play two fiddle and guitar gigs at pubs on Tuesday before the closures. Instead, he holed up in his Whitman, Massachusetts, apartment and livestreamed half-hour music sessions on Facebook, playing between an Irish flag and a pint of Guinness.

“I’m trying to make people feel like it’s a pub,” Roman said.

Pubs and bars across the United States normally count on St. Patrick’s Day and the March Madness college basketball tournament to bring in a large part of their annual revenue.

U.S. consumers had been forecast to spend some $6 billion on St. Patrick’s Day celebrations this year, according to a survey by the National Retail Federation conducted in early February, before the coronavirus pandemic hit the United States in earnest.

The respiratory disease’s spread has left the hospitality industry in the lurch, as workers are barred from their jobs that involve person-to-person contact but have no livelihood without them.

Connolly’s in New York also feeds its staff daily, meaning that its laid-off staff must now find other ways to eat in addition to paying their bills.

“You’re trying to do the right thing by society, but people have to live,” Sweeney said. “I just hope that when it all calms down and settles, that we’ll have places to come back to.”

‘I WOULD HAVE BEEN HURTING’

Several Irish pubs had excess food ready for St. Patrick’s Day customers and needed to find other places for it when they heard the decisions by governors to close restaurants and bars just before the holiday.

Some, like Murphy’s Grand Irish Pub in Alexandria, Virginia, near Washington, were considering selling family meals for delivery, while others, like O’Shaughnessy’s in Chicago, sold off as much corned beef and cabbage as they could at a 25% discount on Monday before splitting up the leftovers and giving them to staff.

Slideshow (11 Images)

Nothing would stop Walter Szarowicz, 81, from getting a St. Patrick’s Day dinner for his wife who has Parkinson’s disease and whose birthday was Tuesday. He drove 30 minutes to Harrington’s Irish Deli on the north side of Chicago to get her corned beef.

Patrons were not permitted to eat at the deli on Tuesday under Chicago’s temporary health regulation, but a few were lined up for takeout.

“If I didn’t go today and get dinner, I would have been hurting,” Szarowicz said. “When I get home, I will be drinking. I got Irish booze.”

Reporting by Gabriella Borter in New York, Ross Kerber in Boston, Brendan O’Brien and PJ Huffstutter in Chicago and Brad Heath in Alexandria, Virginia; Writing by Gabriella Borter; Editing by Scott Malone and Peter Cooney

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.



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Two delicious potato recipes to get you in the mood for St Patrick’s Day


St Patrick’s Day is just around the corner and what better way to celebrate our national holiday than by cooking a tasty recipe featuring our favourite vegetable – the potato.

side from being a staple of the Irish diet, the potato is naturally fat and gluten-free. It’s also a source of fibre, which is important for good digestive health. Not to mention the fact that potatoes have three times the potassium of a banana, making it our very own superfood. 

To get you in the mood for St Patrick’s Day, here are two potato recipes that offer a classic twist on traditional dishes.

Boston-Style St Patrick’s Day Hash Browns

A nod to our American cousins, try this tasty comforting brunch recipe for a delicious start to the festivities.

Ingredients

300g Rooster potatoes, chopped into 1cm pieces

1tbsp oil

100g bacon lardons

½ onion, chopped

100g shredded cabbage (use a mandolin if you have one)

50g cheddar, grated

Method

1. For this recipe, start by chopping the raw potatoes into 1cm pieces.

2. Then, add the potatoes to a pan of salted water and boil until cooked. Remove from the pan and drain. Once the excess water is removed, season the cooked potato well with salt and black pepper.

3. Heat the oil in a large frying pan over a high heat. Add the potatoes to the pan, spread out and resist the urge to move them about until they’re crispy on the underside. When all sides have crisped up, remove from the pan with a slotted spoon and put to one side.

4. Add the bacon lardons. Once crispy, remove from the pan and set aside.

5. Turn the heat to low and add the onion, cooking for five mins until softened before adding the cabbage. Cook until everything is soft, about 10 minutes. Return the potatoes and lardons into the pan, turn up the heat and toss for several minutes so that the potatoes are heated through.

6. Tip the cheddar in and toss again to melt the cheese. Serve immediately.

Potato, Bacon and Cabbage Gratin

This is a flavourful modern twist on a traditional dish, perfect as a hearty dinner. This warming meal makes the most of in-season cabbage too!

Ingredients:

600g Rooster Potatoes

500g savoy or green cabbage, shredded

100g shredded and cooked bacon or ham hock (fat trimmed/removed)

1 clove of garlic

200mls cooking cream

200mls low fat milk

1tbsp butter

20g breadcrumbs

100g cheddar

10g Parmesan, grated

1tbsp chopped parsley

Method:

1. Heat the oven to 200c.

2. Parboil the potatoes for five minutes then drain with a colander. Once cool, thinly slice the potatoes and set aside.

3. Wilt the cabbage, season well and stir in the ham hock.

4. Scald the cream, butter and garlic in a saucepan with a pinch of salt and pepper and set aside.

5. In a gratin dish, layer the potatoes, cheese, ham and cabbage then finish with a layer of potatoes and a sprinkle of cheddar, Parmesan and parsley.

6. Bake in the oven for 25 minutes until golden on top.

7. Serve immediately.

‘Potatoes, Prepare to be Surprised’ is an EU campaign which aims to encourage millennials to enjoy exciting and surprising potato recipes. The campaign is organised by Bord Bia and funded by the EU and the Irish potato industry.

Online Editors



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Harry Styles breaks silence over Valentine’s Day mugging



Harry Styles has assured fans that he is “OK” after recently being mugged in north London.

he One Direction singer, 26, is reported to have handed over cash when he was confronted by a mugger with a knife during a night out in Hampstead on Valentine’s Day.

Styles addressed the incident for the first time on Wednesday during an appearance on US morning programme Today.

Asked by host Carson Daly how he was following the reports of him being mugged, Styles said: “I’m OK, thanks for asking.”

Scotland Yard confirmed last week that the force is investigating a knifepoint robbery in the area.

A statement said: “Officers were contacted on Saturday February 15 regarding the incident which happened at 11.50pm on Friday February 14.

“It was reported that a man in his 20s was approached by another man and threatened him with a knife.

“The victim was not injured however, cash was taken from him.

“No arrests and inquiries are ongoing.”

Styles’ appearance on the US show saw him perform a number of his songs live to crowds in New York, including Kiwi, Adore You and Watermelon Sugar.

He also discussed a potential collaboration with US singer-songwriter Lizzo.

Styles said: “I just thinks she’s amazing, she’s such a great artist, as a fan what you want artists to be is themselves and I think she’s someone who is just herself and she makes amazing music and it’s really feel good and I think it’s what a lot of people need right now.”

He said “maybe” when asked if he would release music with the Juice hitmaker in the future.

PA Media



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