Posted on

New parent charged in college cheating case, agrees to plead guilty


A California woman was charged and has agreed to plead guilty as part of a sweeping college admissions cheating scheme that has resulted in charges against dozens of parents and others, federal prosecutors said this week.

Karen Littlefair, 57, of Newport Beach, was accused of paying $9,000 to have someone from the company of the scheme’s alleged mastermind, William “Rick” Singer, take online courses so that her son could graduate from Georgetown University, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Massachusetts said in a statement Monday.

Littlefair will plead guilty at a later date to one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, prosecutors said.

Let our news meet your inbox. The news and stories that matters, delivered weekday mornings.

That charge carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison, but prosecutors said they will recommend a sentence of four months in prison, one year of supervised release and a fine of $9,500 and restitution.

A lawyer for Littlefair, Kenneth Julian, said his client has “taken the earliest opportunity to take responsibility for her conduct,” The Associated Press reported.

Littlefair is the latest person charged in the scheme. Prosecutors in March announced charges against 50 people as a result of the FBI investigation called Operation Varsity Blues, including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin. The employee for Singer’s company completed four classes for her son at Georgetown and elsewhere, prosecutors said.

Huffman, a one-time Oscar nominee and the wife of actor William H. Macy, a one-time Oscar nominee and the wife of actor William H. Macy, pleaded guilty to mail fraud and honest services fraud in May for paying $15,000 to Singer to cheat on daughter Sophia Grace Macy’s SAT in 2017. She was sentenced to 14 days in prison and served her sentence and has been released.

Loughlin, known for her role in “Full House,” and her fashion-designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, are fighting the charges. They were among those hit with a new bribery charge in October, and they pleaded not guilty in November.

Littlefair’s son graduated from Georgetown in May of 2018 using the credits from the online courses taken by an employee of Singer’s business, prosecutors said.

Georgetown declined to comment about any possible disciplinary action to the AP on Monday but said that the school can revoke degrees in cases of major misconduct.

Singer has pleaded guilty and is cooperating in the government investigation. He wore a wire for the FBI in the case.

In some of the cases, wealthy parents paid to have their children’s scores boosted or tried to get them admitted as fraudulent athletic recruits, or both, officials have said.

Associated Press contributed.



Source link

Posted on

‘It’s not the right word to use’ – Patrick Reed denies claims of cheating



Patrick Reed of the United States reacts during the Hero World Challenge in Nassau, Bahamas. Photo: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
Patrick Reed of the United States reacts during the Hero World Challenge in Nassau, Bahamas. Photo: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

American golfer Patrick Reed has denied cheating in a tournament last week and hit out at International team players for saying he had, as a little edge entered proceedings on Tuesday ahead of the Presidents Cup.

Reed received a two-stroke penalty for improving his lie when he moved sand with his practice swing on Friday at the Hero World Challenge in the Bahamas. The incident has dominated the run up to the biennial contest, which begins on Thursday.

Cameron Smith was quoted in Australian media as saying Reed had been “cheating the rules” and some of his international team-mates said the American had exposed himself to some flak from the crowd through his actions.

Former Masters champion Reed fired back at a news conference on Tuesday, saying “cheat” was inaccurate because he had not seen the sand move and the officials concurred that he inadvertently improved his lie.

“It’s not the right word to use,” he said. “If you do something unintentionally that breaks the rules, it’s not considered cheating…

“If you’re intentionally trying to do something, that would be considered cheating, but I wasn’t intentionally trying to improve a lie or anything like that…

“It’s just wrong, it’s just not right.”

United States captain Tiger Woods on Monday said he had spoken to Reed about the incident and was keen to draw a line under it as he looked to extend the Americans’ seven-match winning streak at the Presidents Cup.

The 15-times major champion sank the winning putt the time the contest was last held at Royal Melbourne in 2011, when the Australian crowd was criticized by some Internationals for being over-awed by the Americans.

Reed suspected the row was being used by the Internationals to ensure that did not happen again.

“Of course they are going to speak out, because they want to get their crowds going and get on their side. That’s the name of the game,” he said.

Reed said he hoped any banter with the crowd remained respectful and that the row over his violation had made him more determined to win.

“It goes from wanting to beat those guys to it now turning personal, so it’s going to be a fun week,” he said.

Who is your sportstar of the year?

Vote in the Irish Independent Sport Star Awards and you could win the ultimate sports prize.

Prizes include, tickets to Ireland’s against Scotland in the Six Nations, All Ireland football and hurling final tickets and much more.

Simply click here to register your vote

Reuters





Source link