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#Huawei ‘is a trusted ally of Europe’


In response to the opinion piece by US Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo published today (2 December) in Politico Europe Huawei issues the following statement:

“Huawei categorically rejects the defamatory and false allegations spread by the government of the United States. These are malicious and well-worn accusations. All they do is to undermine the reputation of the United States. Furthermore, they are an insult to Europe’s sovereignty and to the technical expertise of telecom operators.”

We wish to make it absolutely clear:
Huawei is a 100% privately-owned company. We are not controlled by any arm of the Chinese state.

Huawei does not receive favorable subsidies from any government. Certainly Huawei is not particularly favored by the Chinese government. And certainly there is no “massive state support”.

Huawei is not and has never been involved in espionage of any kind.

We have an extraordinary reputation: Huawei leads on Cybersecurity and has a clean track record without one single major data breach incident in the last 30 years. As Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei has underlined: rather than hand over customer data to a government, we would shut down the company.

Huawei welcomes and encourages the EU’s facts-based approach towards the security of 5G networks. Indeed, this is the model that both German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron have endorsed as the gold standard for 5G verification.

Huawei is Europe’s natural partner for deploying 5G together and for supporting Europe in attaining its digital sovereignty.

Huawei’s 5G solution is safe and innovative. It is a key contributor towards mitigating the effects of climate change and connecting the world. And it is a central element to safeguard Europe’s values and the European way of life for future generations.

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Tags: china, eu, featured, full-image, Huawei

Category: A Frontpage, China, EU, Technology, Telecoms





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#Huawei says latest US ban based on ‘innuendo’


Huawei logo

US telecommunications regulators have declared Huawei and ZTE national security threats in the latest action by the US government against the Chinese tech giants, writes the BBC.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has also proposed forcing US customers to replace equipment previously purchased from the firms.

Huawei called the decision “profoundly mistaken”.

It said it was based on “innuendo, and mistaken assumptions”.

Huawei had made inroads in the US market, winning customers among rural telecommunications operators with relatively inexpensive network equipment.

But US officials have increasingly raised concerns about ties between Chinese tech firms and their government in Beijing.

In declaring Huawei and ZTE threats , the FCC on Friday cited the companies’ “close ties to the Chinese government and military apparatus” and “Chinese laws requiring them to assist with espionage”.

The agency ordered that money from an $8.5 billion aid programme to improve mobile and internet coverage in poor and underserved areas could not be used to buy equipment from firms deemed national security threats.

‘Cautiously optimistic’

Lobby group Rural Wireless Association said it was “cautiously optimistic” that members with Huawei or ZTE equipment will be able to comply with the order without disrupting service.

The FCC has estimated that replacing the equipment would cost about $2bn.

Huawei criticized the FCC’s actions, saying they would have “profound negative effects on connectivity for Americans in rural and underserved areas across the United States.”

It added that the FCC had presented “no evidence that Huawei poses a security risk. Instead, the FCC simply assumes, based on a mistaken view of Chinese law, that Huawei might come under Chinese government control.”

The US has alleged that Huawei’s equipment could be abused for spying and urged other countries to bar Huawei from 5G networks,

The White House placed Huawei on a trade blacklist in May citing national security fears. The move barred US firms from doing business without special approval

The Commerce Department had offered waivers, including for telecommunications firms in rural areas that relied on Huawei’s equipment to continue to receive service.





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