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Elon Musk found not guilty of defaming British cave explorer | Technology


Elon Musk did not defame British cave explorer Vernon Unsworth by calling him a “pedo guy” on Twitter, a Los Angeles jury found Friday.

The case has pitted a 64-year-old financial adviser earning a salary of about £25,000 ($33,000) against one of the richest and most famous men in the world. The dispute stems from the Tesla and SpaceX chief’s ancillary involvement in the Tham Luang cave rescue in June and July 2018, which saw 12 young football players and their coach successfully extracted from a flooded cave system by a team of British cave divers.

On 13 July 2018, after the successful completion of the rescue, Unsworth said in an interview with CNN that the rescue pod Musk had delivered to the cave site was a “PR stunt”, adding that he should “stick his submarine where it hurts”. A video clip of the interview went viral, drawing the ire of Musk.

The billionaire entrepreneur responded in a series of tweets on 15 July, suggesting that Unsworth’s presence in Thailand was “sus[picious]” and calling him “pedo guy”.

Musk eventually deleted the tweets and apologized to Unsworth.

The jury was tasked with determining whether a reasonable person would understand the tweets to mean that Musk was calling Unsworth a pedophile.

Musk’s attorneys argued that the tweet was not a statement of fact, but an insult, which is considered protected speech. They also attempted to show that Unsworth’s reputation had not been seriously damaged.

Unsworth’s attorneys introduced evidence of the broad dissemination of Musk’s tweets, which were reported in 490 English-language articles on 361 websites in 33 countries.

They also introduced evidence of Musk’s behavior after the 15 July tweets, including his hiring of a private investigator to seek proof of Unsworth’s “nefarious behaviour”.



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#Huawei ‘is a trusted ally of Europe’


In response to the opinion piece by US Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo published today (2 December) in Politico Europe Huawei issues the following statement:

“Huawei categorically rejects the defamatory and false allegations spread by the government of the United States. These are malicious and well-worn accusations. All they do is to undermine the reputation of the United States. Furthermore, they are an insult to Europe’s sovereignty and to the technical expertise of telecom operators.”

We wish to make it absolutely clear:
Huawei is a 100% privately-owned company. We are not controlled by any arm of the Chinese state.

Huawei does not receive favorable subsidies from any government. Certainly Huawei is not particularly favored by the Chinese government. And certainly there is no “massive state support”.

Huawei is not and has never been involved in espionage of any kind.

We have an extraordinary reputation: Huawei leads on Cybersecurity and has a clean track record without one single major data breach incident in the last 30 years. As Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei has underlined: rather than hand over customer data to a government, we would shut down the company.

Huawei welcomes and encourages the EU’s facts-based approach towards the security of 5G networks. Indeed, this is the model that both German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron have endorsed as the gold standard for 5G verification.

Huawei is Europe’s natural partner for deploying 5G together and for supporting Europe in attaining its digital sovereignty.

Huawei’s 5G solution is safe and innovative. It is a key contributor towards mitigating the effects of climate change and connecting the world. And it is a central element to safeguard Europe’s values and the European way of life for future generations.

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Category: A Frontpage, China, EU, Technology, Telecoms





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‘We are hiring big time’: Calgary tech companies join forces to attract job seekers – Calgary


A Calgary-based group of tech companies held a hiring fair downtown on Saturday to help get the word out that the technology sector needs skilled workers.

Jason Moore was working as a geologist in Calgary for the past eight years until September when he was laid off.

“I left on good terms. They treated me very fairly but it was more just a side effect of what all of Alberta is going through at this time,” Moore said.


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Moore is one of the hundreds of people who attended the first Tech West Collective hiring expo on Saturday. He now considers himself lucky. Moore is learning the world of coding and discovering a passion he never knew he had.

“I think one of the great things about coding is you get to build stuff, and you get to see if it works right away. It’s like the mouse pushing the button and you get the pellet,” Moore said with a laugh.

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The Tech West Collective is a group of Calgary tech companies that have teamed up to help fill vacant positions.

“We are feeling a talent gap. Now we want to build up the talent pool,” said Tech West Collective organizer Kat Lesperance.

Lesperance works at Showpass, a Calgary-based tech company that provides ticketing solutions for event organizers. Showpass and Avanti Software are two of the seven members of the collective.

“We are hiring big time,” said David Owen Cord, Avanti Software co-CEO.

He said the company is looking for people of all backgrounds — not just tech-related positions.

“It’s been interesting because of the negative headlines here in Calgary and the layoffs that are going on but we are having a very different reality in the business we live in every day. One of our biggest challenges is actually filling the open spots that we are trying to hire for,” Owen Cord said.

Part of the problem is a lack of people with tech skills.

EvolveU is a non-profit educational institution that is helping job hunters transform their careers to adapt to the rapidly changing digital economy.

“There’s so much opportunity right now that people don’t even know about. That’s exciting for me and it’s exciting to watch the students go through the transformation,” said Jen Morrison, program manager with EvolveU, at the job fair on Saturday.

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Calgary working to attract tech talent

Members of the Tech West Collective said it’s time for tech companies to stop poaching talent from each other and get the word out that Calgary’s economy goes beyond oil and gas. Those transitioning from the energy industry said the job hunt in the tech world is more encouraging.

“There [are] more jobs than would be for my old profession. It’s not that they’re handing them out, but there definitely does seem to be more excitement and more opportunity and a desire for more people to enter this industry,” Moore said, adding that he’s taking courses at EvolveU.

According to Calgary Economic Development, the city has over 2,000 open tech jobs.




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#Huawei says latest US ban based on ‘innuendo’


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US telecommunications regulators have declared Huawei and ZTE national security threats in the latest action by the US government against the Chinese tech giants, writes the BBC.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has also proposed forcing US customers to replace equipment previously purchased from the firms.

Huawei called the decision “profoundly mistaken”.

It said it was based on “innuendo, and mistaken assumptions”.

Huawei had made inroads in the US market, winning customers among rural telecommunications operators with relatively inexpensive network equipment.

But US officials have increasingly raised concerns about ties between Chinese tech firms and their government in Beijing.

In declaring Huawei and ZTE threats , the FCC on Friday cited the companies’ “close ties to the Chinese government and military apparatus” and “Chinese laws requiring them to assist with espionage”.

The agency ordered that money from an $8.5 billion aid programme to improve mobile and internet coverage in poor and underserved areas could not be used to buy equipment from firms deemed national security threats.

‘Cautiously optimistic’

Lobby group Rural Wireless Association said it was “cautiously optimistic” that members with Huawei or ZTE equipment will be able to comply with the order without disrupting service.

The FCC has estimated that replacing the equipment would cost about $2bn.

Huawei criticized the FCC’s actions, saying they would have “profound negative effects on connectivity for Americans in rural and underserved areas across the United States.”

It added that the FCC had presented “no evidence that Huawei poses a security risk. Instead, the FCC simply assumes, based on a mistaken view of Chinese law, that Huawei might come under Chinese government control.”

The US has alleged that Huawei’s equipment could be abused for spying and urged other countries to bar Huawei from 5G networks,

The White House placed Huawei on a trade blacklist in May citing national security fears. The move barred US firms from doing business without special approval

The Commerce Department had offered waivers, including for telecommunications firms in rural areas that relied on Huawei’s equipment to continue to receive service.





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