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live score and latest goal updates from derby



No side likes to lose a derby. It’s a fierce battle for bragging rights (does anyone use that phrase other than in sport?!) which can see families divided and passions overflow. 

But this Manchester match up, the last of the decade, is for vastly different reasons a must-win for both Pep Guardiola and Ole Gunnar Solskjaer. 

For the United manager it’s a case of simply trying to keep his job. 

It seems to happen that as soon as one club decide to sack their manager that a load follow suit. No sooner than Tottenham sacked Pochettino than Arsenal (Unai Emery), Waford (Quique Sánchez Flores) and Everton (Marco Silva) all followed suit within the next two weeks. Even by the standards of the bonkers Premier League owners – moneybags men who always want success yesterday – that’s some going. So for that reason alone Solskjaer needs a result at the Etihad today – sacking the boss is clearly the festive fashion this year and Ole will not want to add his name to the sorry list. 

United have made their worst start to a season since 1989 and with every defeat the death knells surrounding the Norwegian’s place in the dugout grow louder. A loss to their city rivals could be too much for a twitchy board to take.  





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Sacking Marco Silva won’t change anything at Everton



It’s unlikely a manager of Simeone’s calibre would be tempted by a move to a mid-table Premier League side regardless but swinging wildly from possession-focused managers like Martinez and Koeman to the more pragmatic Allardyce, Moyes or uber-defensive Simeone is the kind of thing a director of football is supposed to prevent from happening. 

If Everton are after a young, talented, ambitious, multilingual coach with experience of winning competitions, there are few in Europe with a better CV than the 42-year-old, league-winning Silva, who the club’s director of football, Marcel Brands, is said to be extremely reluctant to relieve of his duties. 

The biggest issue is Everton’s player recruitment. Brands is trying to steer the club towards an envisioned destination, signing players who fit a particular profile (under 23 years old, high potential, resale value), but has enjoyed mixed success. It takes time to build a team and Everton are only two years in to Brands’ project.





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How New Zealand have embraced boutique cricket grounds



“You can’t go far wrong if you present your sport in a way that makes the TV viewer wish they were there in person,” says Jon Long, the former head of strategy at the ICC who now runs the consultancy Bayridge Sports. “For Test matches the boutique venues in New Zealand achieve that much more effectively than an empty Eden Park.”

New Zealand have increasingly embraced as much. With smaller grounds, the costs of hosting games are less; indeed, New Zealand came close to breaking even from the Bay Oval Test, whereas they lost far more money hosting England at Eden Park 18 months ago – even though 12,000 more people attended over the five days.

“The players love it – they prefer the intimacy,” says David White, the chief executive of New Zealand Cricket. “The feedback we’re receiving is that the public and fans also prefer the grass banks and the picnic atmosphere of these types of grounds.”

The lessons from New Zealand’s small ground success could be extended. South Africa, Sri Lanka and the UAE, Long suggests, are among the countries where similar grounds could be rolled out for most Test matches.





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