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Work on light rail network halted until April 13




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Russia deploys chemical defense troops to Italy – Defence Blog


Russia reportedly is deploying its Troops of Radiological, Chemical and Biological Defence or RChB Defense to Italy.

Russia has loaded nine Il-76 cargo planes that flew to Italy, with eight mobile medical teams, medical equipment and aerosol disinfection trucks. Moscow also sent about 100 military specialists in virology and epidemics, one special military laboratory and 20 mobile disinfection vehicles.

Mobile complexes with equipment for diagnosis and disinfection were delivered to the Italian Air Force Practitioner de Mare airbase, located 30 kilometers south-west of Rome, Russia’s Defense Ministry said in a statement.

In photos released by Russian Defense Ministry Press Service, the doors of military trucks bore signs with heart-shaped Russian and Italian flags that read: “From Russia with love” in Russian, Italian and English.

Putin spoke to Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte on Saturday, the Kremlin said, saying the Russian leader had offered his support and help in the form of mobile disinfection vehicles and specialists to help the worst hit Italian regions.

Italy recorded a jump in deaths from coronavirus of almost 800 on Saturday, taking the toll in the world’s hardest-hit country to almost 5,000.

 

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‘I’m kind of scared’: Surgery for cancer patients and others cancelled as hospitals brace for possible COVID-19 wave


Janice Ense never actually got to talk to her doctor, or anyone else for that matter.

While she was out on Monday, an assistant left Ense a voicemail message announcing that the unfolding COVID-19 crisis had forced the postponement of her kidney cancer surgery.

The operation was supposed to take place next Thursday at Toronto’s St. Michael’s Hospital. Now the 47-year-old from Manitoulin Island, an eight-hour drive north, has no idea when the tumour will be removed. As the pain from it continues unabated.

“I’m kind of scared, because I don’t know if it’s going to metastasize … It has grown substantially in the past year,” Ense said in an interview Wednesday. “I was really disappointed. I was psyched physically and mentally to have major surgery and then, boom, it’s delayed.”

She is not alone.

Relatively few Canadians have contracted the novel coronavirus and fewer still have died from it. But COVID-19 is already having a tangible impact on thousands of the ill in Canada as hospitals postpone elective surgeries and transplants and clear out clinics and wards to ready for a possible wave of infected patients.

The moves — many announced in just the last few days — are designed partly to prevent sick and immune-compromised patients from being infected by COVID-19, but mostly to free up critical-care space and equipment should the pandemic suddenly spike.

The rationale is that even if a surgery is not urgent, those patients often spend time in the intensive-care unit and occupy a ward bed, resources that would be desperately needed if Canada experiences an Italy-like surge in COVID-19 cases.

“This is a big deal, we are doing a lot less,” said Vancouver cardiologist Dr. Andrew Krahn, a spokesman for the Heart and Stroke Foundation and president of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society.


Toronto General Hospital. COVID-19 is already having a tangible impact on thousands of the ill in Canada as hospitals postpone elective surgeries.

Dave Thomas/Postmedia/File

The cardiac care system has years of experience managing wait lists and ensuring the most urgent cases get looked after quickly, but there is always a concern with delaying treatment, especially if the coronavirus disruptions last for more than a few weeks, said Krahn.

“Of course there’s worry,” he said. “There’s no question indefinite delays will lead to people having bad things happen while they are waiting.”

With some variations from province to province, hospitals across the country are postponing all elective cardiac procedures, resulting in a reduction in bypass, stent and other operations of 50 to 75 per cent, said Krahn. The society is also recommending that clincs and diagnostic services essentially be closed, “except for very ill people.”

That means, for instance, that a patient who fainted because of a heart condition would be treated immediately. But those who have a routine stress test that indicates they have a borderline need for a stent will have to wait, he said.

This is a big deal, we are doing a lot less

Toronto’s University Health Network, which encompasses four major hospitals, tends to care for “the most acute patients in the country.” But it is delaying most elective surgeries — from non-urgent gall bladder and hernia operations to hip replacements — a reduction of 25 to 40 per cent, said CEO Dr. Kevin Smith.

Also postponed are kidney transplants except those involving dead donors and recipients who are “highly sensitized or quickly deteriorating,” and lung transplants for any patient who is not declining rapidly.

Smith said the process is being carried out with care, each potentially postponed case reviewed by a panel of doctors. Some cancer surgeries, such as those involving slow-developing tumours, can be delayed safely, he noted.

Smith said there’s been relatively little pushback from patients — some have even asked for a delay to lessen their potential exposure to COVID-19 — but acknowledged it can be difficult.

“No patient wants to hear ‘You’ve got a malignancy and I’m going to wait to take it out,’ ” said the CEO. “But we’re trying to balance that against the risk and needs of other patients we anticipate coming to the hospital.”

Still, a study of the spillover effects of the 2003 SARS outbreak in the Toronto area — relatively small compared to the scope of the COVID-19 changes — found that efforts to reduce the demand on hospital services had some unintended, and troubling, consequences.

There were actually reductions in high-acuity visits to Toronto emergency departments and of hospital admissions for heart attacks, gastrointestinal bleeding and pulmonary embolisms — blood clots in the lung.

Emergency physician Dr. Michael Schull, who headed the research, said some emergency departments are now also seeing significantly reduced patient volumes. Public health authorities should remind Canadians they can still go to the hospital if they have a serious problem, said the CEO of the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences.

“As much as we’re telling patients ‘Stay home, don’t go out unless you have to’ … we should also be telling people: ‘If you need the health system, it’s there for you and make use of it.”





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Canadian recession is likely without fiscal stimulus: Scotiabank


Canada is likely to fall into a recession this year unless the government moves ahead with robust fiscal stimulus as the economy takes a double hit from the coronavirus and tanking oil prices, according to the Bank of Nova Scotia.

Scotiabank is the first of the six largest Canadian banks to predict the country could be headed into a recession, though it believes the government will move quickly enough to avert one. A rapid rise in coronavirus cases globally, the sharp fall in oil prices and volatility in financial markets make a contraction in the second and third quarters this year “likely” in the absence of fiscal measures, Jean-François Perrault, chief economist at Scotiabank, said Wednesday.

“A reasonably mild recession appears likely unless timely and targeted fiscal measures are deployed in the very near future to deal with the economic impacts of the virus,” Perrault wrote in a research note.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau released $1.1 billion in new funding earlier Wednesday in response to the virus, and said the government is ready to do more if necessary. Trudeau also said his government is prepared to use federal financing agencies to further stimulate the economy if needed, a measure that was deployed during the 2008-09 financial crisis.

But that may not be enough. Canada’s measures pale in comparison to those set out by countries such as Italy, which plans to spend as much as 25 billion euros ($28.3 billion) on stimulus measures. Perrault recommends the government roll out a fiscal package equivalent to one per cent of GDP, or just over $20 billion, in order to prevent the Canadian economy from going into recession.

The Toronto-based bank sees the country’s gross domestic product growth slowing to 0.3 per cent for the year in the absence of significant stimulus. Scotiabank’s isn’t the first bearish call to emerge this week in the aftermath of the oil price collapse but it does represent the most aggressive take yet on Canada’s future.

National Bank of Canada Financial and Royal Bank of Canada will release their forecasts later this week. Bank of Montreal was the first of the six banks to revise their forecasts lower this week, with a call for full year GDP growth at 0.5 per cent.

The latest stream of downward revisions include predictions that the Bank of Canada will cut rates to 0.25 per cent by June from its current 1.25 per cent. That’s in line with financial market expectations, according to overnight index swaps trading. The last time the Bank of Canada policy rate reached 0.25 per cent was in 2009. Earlier this month, the central bank cut interest rates by 50 basis points amid escalating coronavirus concerns, matching an emergency move by the Federal Reserve.

Here are the latest revisions from bank economists this week:

Scotiabank — Jean-François Perrault

Sees Canada’s 2020 GDP at 0.3 per cent in absence of substantial fiscal stimulus and 0.7 per cent if there is fiscal stimulus worth one per cent of GDP. Without fiscal stimulus, Q2 and Q3 GDP will contract. Expects the Bank of Canada to cut interest rates by 50 basis points at the next two meetings.

Bank of Montreal — Michael Gregory

Lowers 2020 GDP to 0.5 per cent from one per cent, and sees Q2 contracting by 3.5 per cent. Expects Bank of Canada to cut rates by 100 basis points over the next two meetings to 0.25 per cent.

JPMorgan — Silvana Dimino

Revises down 2020 forecast to one per cent or 1.1 per cent Q4/Q4 basis. Predicts no growth in Q2 and a two per cent rebound in Q3. Expects Bank of Canada to cut by 50 basis points in April with the “heightened risk” for an earlier emergency cut to zero per cent.

Goldman Sachs — Daan Struyven

Revises down 2020 GDP to 0.4 per cent or 0.2 per cent on a Q4/Q4 basis. Sees Canada on “verge of recession” with a zero per cent Q1, -0.5 per cent Q2, 0.25 per cent Q3 and one per cent Q4. Expects Bank of Canada to lower policy rate to 0.25 per cent by its June meeting.

 — With assistance from Erik Hertzberg and Kait Bolongaro

Bloomberg.com



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Jose Mourinho insists he will win a trophy at Tottenham despite recent struggles


Jose Mourinho has promised to end Tottenham’s trophy drought.

Mourinho insists he will prove he has not lost his magic touch even though he admits he faces a huge task in turning around their last 16 Champions League tie.

Tottenham boss Mourinho has won the European Cup twice and three Premier League titles in a glittering career with Porto, Chelsea , Inter Milan, Real Madrid and Manchester United .

But Mourinho knows he is under pressure at Tottenham who brought him in to deliver silverware as they have not won anything since the League Cup in 2008.

Mourinho, who signed a three and a half year contract until 2023, said: “I believe Tottenham is not going to be my only club without silverware. I won it at every club and I believe I am going to do it also with Tottenham.

Jose Mourinho was speaking ahead of Tottenham’s Champions League game against Leipzig

“I am here for three or four months. I get the team in v difficult situation and now even more difficult but I believe in me, in the players, in the club and I believe that during my contract I will help the club to do it.”

Mourinho has been dealt another huge injury blow after ruling £26m January signing Steven Bergwijn for the rest of the season after he suffered a sprained left ankle at Burnley on Saturday.

Tottenham trail 1-0 from the first leg and Mourinho said the players must embrace the club’s To Dare Is To Do motto and be brave and attack RB Leipzig despite being big underdogs.

Spurs are renowned for their ambition of winning with style but Mourinho insisted his philosophy delivers success even if there is no escape from the club’s vision.

Tottenham have been in dreadful form recently

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“To dare is to do? I read it every day because it’s written everywhere at the training ground and of course it is,” said Mourinho.

You know more or less my principles, my philosophy, what I love and hate. Yes I feel connection with to dare is to do.

“And tomorrow is a time to give abs everything. We win or we leave everything we have on that pitch. But take more risks and win nothing? It’s good to take risks when you win.”





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Pentagon abandons plans to buy more Israeli missile defense systems – Defence Blog


The U.S. Department of Defense abandons plans to buy Israeli-made missile defense systems due to cyber vulnerabilities and other problems. according to The Times of Israel.

The Israel-based, English-language online newspaper has reported that U.S. military curbing its plans to adopt the Iron Dome missile defense system due to concerns about its compatibility with existing US technologies, scrapping its plans to buy two more batteries.

A central problem was Israel’s refusal to provide the U.S. military with Iron Dome’s source code, hampering the Americans’ ability to integrate the system into their air defenses.

Gen. Mike Murray, head of Army Futures Command, said the service identified a number of problems — including cyber vulnerabilities and operational challenges — during efforts last year to integrate elements of Iron Dome with the US Army’s Integrated Battle Command System.

“It took us longer to acquire those [first] two batteries than we would have liked,” Murray told the House Armed Service tactical air and land forces subcommittee on Thursday. “We believe we cannot integrate them into our air defense system based on some interoperability challenges, some cyber challenges and some other challenges.”

Last year, U.S.’s military magazine, Defense News, quoting the deputy in charge of the service’s air and missile defense modernization efforts, has announced that the contract to purchase two Iron Dome batteries for the U.S. Army’s interim cruise missile defense capability has been finalized.

“Now that the contract is set in stone, the Army will be able to figure out delivery schedules and details in terms of taking receipt of the systems,” Daryl Youngman told Defense News at the Space and Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, on Aug. 8.

The Iron Dome is the world’s most-used system, intercepting more than 1,900 incoming targets with a success rate exceeding 90 percent since being fielded in 2011.

Iron Domedetects, assesses and intercepts a variety of shorter-range targets such as rockets, artillery and mortars. It is effective day or night and in all weather conditions including low clouds, rain, dust storms and fog. It features a first-of-its-kind multi-mission launcher designed to fire a variety of interceptor missiles.

The system can protect deployed and maneuvering forces, as well as the Forward Operating Base (FOB) and urban areas, against a wide range of indirect and aerial threats.

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Fort Langley development proposed as Kwantlen First Nation partnership


A stalled plan to redevelop two big plots of Downtown Fort Langley might be back on the table in the form of a partnership with the Kwantlen First Nation, the partners announced March 4.

The proposal is to arrange a transfer of the 1.2 hectares of prime commercial real estate, in two parcels, from the Eric Woodward Foundation to the Kwantlen, which would apply to have it added to the First Nation’s reserve.

Assuming the addition is successful, Fort Langley Properties, a company wholly owned by the foundation, would lease the land back to co-develop the real estate into a mixed-use commercial and residential district in the heart of the historic village’s shopping district.

The Kwantlen view the proposal as “an amazing step towards reconciliation,” Chief Marilyn Gabriel said in a news release, “helping to strengthen the Kwantlen First Nation and promote ourselves as a key partner and leader in our regional economy.”

“Kwantlen has been growing tremendously in capacity and working tirelessly to promote meaningful partnerships within our territories for the next seven generations,” Gabriel said.

The Kwantlen “are always looking to increase our land base for the Nation,” said Brenda Knights, CEO of the First Nation’s economic development corporation, Seyem.

The 2014 example of the transfer of the 21-hectare Jericho Lands to a Musqueam, Tsleil-Waututh and Squamish First Nations corporation “spurred a lot of interest across Canada” for similar ventures, Knights said.

“Squamish as well recently acquired lands,” Knights said, “so we see this as Kwantlen’s time now.”

The Kwantlen still have to submit an application, which could take three-to-five years to complete, under federal rules that were revised last fall to shorten the process from an average of 10 years, Knights said.

The property, valued at $13 million to $14 million, is less than a kilometre away from the Kwantlen’s existing 181-hectare IR 6 lands. Knights said the First Nation previously had property from within that reserve expropriated for the old Albion Ferry and is going through the process to have that returned as well.

Such a downtown addition, however, would remove development from the municipal authority of the Township of Langley, where current owner Woodward has had on-again, off-again plans to redevelop the two properties into a mixed-use neighbourhood with 100,000 square feet of commercial space and 75 residential units. In the past, the Fort Langley community has been divided over the amount of change such development would bring to the downtown district, which is designated a heritage conservation area.

Woodward, who has also been a councillor for the Township of Langley since 2018, withdrew previous applications for development with the township. Woodward said the economics of renovation don’t make sense for 11 of 12 buildings on the two properties, save for the 1928 Simpson Bros. building at the corner of Glover Road and McBride Street, which he had always planned to restore.

“And we’re in this bind where we’ve had delays with getting approvals to move forward, and in the interim, not been allowed to remove them,” Woodward said.

In the meantime, Woodward had begun transferring ownership of the properties, many that sit empty and boarded up, from his company, Statewood Properties, to the non-profit charitable foundation, which he intends to be a legacy for the community’s benefit. And late last spring he started discussions with the Kwantlen about the possibility of a development in partnership with the First Nation.

“In hindsight, it’s fantastic to have ended up here,” Woodward said of the partnership and being able to draw the Kwantlen into economic development on property that is within their traditional territory. “And I think that the way we’ve been talking about it that once this announcement is public, to the people in Fort Langley and Langley, it will seem obvious, inevitable and wonderful. Not about buildings and not about some temporary dispute with a few politicians who won’t be around much longer.”

Knights said the application to add land only initiates the process, which will involve consultation with the Township of Langley to work through concerns and deal with agreements over municipal services, and eventually a referendum for all Kwantlen residents.

“We’re often on the receiving end of referrals from government (over developments) and now we’re playing that role,” Knights said.

And while Woodward had previous plans for the site, Knights said what finally gets built will have to be determined through the planning process.

“Certainly our membership will be interested in having a strong presence in Fort Langley and having the buildings reflect Kwantlen,” Knights said, but whatever it is has to make economic sense.

Kwantlen First Nation Coun. Tumia Knott added that they want to be good neighbours with the township.

I think it’s really important that it’s complementary to the region (and) fits within community values,” Knott said. “Not just Kwantlen’s values, but the values of the region of Fort Langley that we call home.”

In a news release, Knights referred to the partnership as a unique initiative in private-public reconciliation with a First Nation that impressed B.C. Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation Scott Fraser.

“It’s great to see partnerships like this one demonstrating the real benefits of reconciliation,” Fraser said in a statement, “that by working together, we get better outcomes that benefit First Nations, governments and the communities and people they serve.”

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Nine snowmobilers stuck on mountain near Whistler, B.C., found safe: RCMP


WHISTLER, B.C. — The RCMP say nine snowmobilers who were stuck in the Brandywine Mountain area south of Whistler, British Columbia, have been found and are safe.

The Mounties say in a news release Monday that the snowmobilers have returned to their vehicles cold and hungry, but otherwise OK.

Staff Sgt. Paul Hayes says the snowmobilers’ families and friends began calling police Sunday night to report they had not returned home to various locations in the Lower Mainland.

Hayes said the snowmobilers’ vehicles were found parked in the Brandywine Mountain area and they were believed to be travelling in three groups.

He says the weather appears to have changed quickly, stopping the snowmobilers from returning and preventing search crews for searching for them in the backcountry.

Police say one of the groups was equipped with satellite tracking and the snowmobilers were prepared to spend time in the backcountry.



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Pete Buttigieg is taunted by jeering protesters who chase the Democrat away during campaign stop gone wrong – The Sun


DEMOCRATIC presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg was met by jeering protestors as a recent campaign stop appeared to go horribly wrong.

Buttigieg was initially welcomed by $15 minimum wage activists – but things soon went south for the former South Bend, Indiana mayor, according to footage taken at an event on Monday.

 Pete Buttigieg was heckled as he left a campaign event in Charleston, South Carolina, on Monday

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Pete Buttigieg was heckled as he left a campaign event in Charleston, South Carolina, on MondayCredit: EPA
 As he left, Buttigieg was pressed by protesters, who had chanted that he could not be their president and pressed him on his policy record

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As he left, Buttigieg was pressed by protesters, who had chanted that he could not be their president and pressed him on his policy recordCredit: AP:Associated Press

In the video, posted by TIME, Buttigieg can be seen making a stop to join McDonald’s workers and activists taking part in a Fight For $15 march, in Charleston, South Carolina.

The 38-year-old was initially welcomed by the group, and after hugging one protestor, the former attempted to give a speech to the crowd.

Within a minute of Buttigieg taking the mic, however, the heckles had begun.

One person could be heard calling the former mayor a “flip-flopper,” while another said he was “co-opting the movement.”

“PETE CAN’T BE OUR PRESIDENT”

Soon, minimum wage marchers had begun chanting over Buttigieg’s speech itself, repeating their slogan, “We work, we sweat, put $15 on our check.”

Also present at the march were members of the Poor People’s Campaign and activists from Black Youth Project 100, an African American youth social justice organization.

Members of the latter then began to heckle Buttigieg over his political record.

As the former mayor then walked away from the minimum wage march, flanked by campaign staff, BYP100 activists began chanting: “Pete can’t be our President. Where was $15 in South Bend?”

 Buttigieg has initially been marching with a minimum wage advocacy group, Fight For $15, before the heckles began

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Buttigieg has initially been marching with a minimum wage advocacy group, Fight For $15, before the heckles beganCredit: EPA
 The former South Bend, Indiana, mayor was then heckled by another group of protestors, who chanted he couldn't be their president

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The former South Bend, Indiana, mayor was then heckled by another group of protestors, who chanted he couldn’t be their presidentCredit: 2020

The TIME footage shows Buttigieg leaving the scene and being followed by BYP100 activists.

As he then moved to enter his SUV, the presidential candidate could be heard referencing a plan for disabled workers to those who had followed him.

According to reports, Buttigieg was the only president candidate to appear at the March – though representative from other candidates’ campaign teams were present.

In the latest Winthrop Poll, Buttigieg only had 1% support from African Americans.

The minimum wage in Indiana currently stands at $7.25.

POLITICAL RECORD QUESTIONED

Last year, when Buttigieg was the city’s mayor, the South Bend Tribune called for the minimum wage to be increased to $12 per hour.

In 2016, Buttigieg had been able to get minimum wage for city employees raised to $10.10 an hour – but state law prevented local municipalities from instituting a higher mandated minimum wage for all businesses.

South Carolina primary is the forth nominating contest for the Democratic Party in 2020 and will take place on February 29.

Candidates have already stressed the importance of succeeding in the state, which awards 63 delegates, of which 54 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

Success in South Carolina can also bolster candidates going into Super Tuesday, which will see fourteen state primaries take place, as well as the American Samoa caucuses.

This day of voting will amount to 1344 pledged delegates – 33.8 percent of the nationwide total.

According to a recent poll by Clemson University, Joe Biden holds an 18 point lead going into South Carolina, where he hopes to close the gap on frontrunner Bernie Sanders.

 Polls show Joe Biden is currently the favorite to win South Carolina, whose primary takes place on February 29

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Polls show Joe Biden is currently the favorite to win South Carolina, whose primary takes place on February 29Credit: Getty Images – Getty
 Bernie Sanders is currently the frontrunner in the race for the Democratic Party's presidential nominee

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Bernie Sanders is currently the frontrunner in the race for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomineeCredit: AP:Associated Press


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Scrapped: How nearly $150 billion worth of energy projects have been shelved in Canada


By Kevin Martine

Canadian and international investors have had a hard time getting shovels in the ground on their projects, even after securing regulatory approval. The reasons have been many: pure economics, political divisions, Indigenous disapproval and environmental concerns.

All of the above factors have left a slew of projects stranded as Canadians are unable to agree on our need to develop resources and at the same time fight climate change. Together, they make up around $150 billion of lost investment opportunity that would have generated taxes, jobs and businesses for the domestic economy.

Here are some of the major energy projects over the past few years that never saw the light of day:

Project: Frontier Oilsands Mine

Cost: $20.6 billion
Company: Teck Resources Ltd.

The proposed oilsands mine in northern Alberta was expected to produce 260,000 barrels of oil per day. It was cancelled by the proponent over the weekend amid a major fight between Ottawa and Alberta over climate change issues, a lack of pipeline capacity and low oil prices. The project was expected to push up Canadian carbon emissions and was opposed by environmental groups, but enjoyed the support of many First Nations in the region.

Project: Northern Gateway
Cost: $7.9 billion
Company: Enbridge Inc.
The proposed pipeline to bring oil from northern Alberta to a port in Kitimat B.C. was approved by Stephen Harper’s government in 2014, but was quashed by a Federal Court of Appeal two years later. It was rejected by the Liberal government in 2016.

The pipeline was expected to ship 525,000 barrels of oil per day to international markets and boost pipeline capacity to meet the needs of surging Canadian oil production.

Project: Energy East
Cost: $16 billion
Company: TransCanada Corp. (now TC Energy Corp.)

A proposed pipeline to carry 1.1 million barrels of crude oil per day from Alberta and Saskatchewan to coastal refineries in New Brunswick. TransCanada planned to build 1,500 kilometres of new pipe and reverse the direction on another 3,000 km of an existing pipeline. It faced heavy opposition in Quebec and Ontario and the environmental review process was marked by controversy. The National Energy Board, the regulator at the time, ultimately asked the company to restart the environmental review process. TransCanada scrapped the project in October 2017.

Project: Pacific Northwest LNG
Cost: $36 billion
Lead company: Petronas Bhd.

The proposed LNG pipeline and export terminal in Prince Rupert B.C. on the Pacific Ocean was to export as much as 18 million tonnes of natural gas per year. The Malaysian state-owned oil and gas company and its international partners said high upfront investment costs along with plummeting global prices for natural gas reduced the feasibility of the project. The project also faced a lengthy environmental review process, with concerns raised by local Indigenous groups about the project’s impact on fragile salmon spawning grounds in the area. It was cancelled by Petronas in July 2017.

Project: Aurora LNG
Cost: $28 billion
Lead company: Nexen Energy

The proposed LNG export terminal was expected to be built south of Prince Rupert in B.C. The project was a partnership between Nexen, the Chinese-oil company based in Calgary, and Japan-based INPEX Gas. It was expected to handle between 10 to 12 million tonnes of natural gas each year, but the proponents announced in September 2017 that they would scrap the project.

Project: Prince Rupert LNG
Cost: $16 billion
Lead company: Royal Dutch Shell

The proposed LNG export facility in Prince Rupert B.C. was expected to have an export capacity of up to 21 million tonnes per year. It was cancelled in March 2017, after its developer BG Group was acquired by Royal Dutch Shell.

Shell said that it was cancelling the project because it wished to focus on its other B.C. LNG project in Kitimat B.C. The LNG Canada export terminal will connect resources in B.C. to Asian markets via the Coastal Gaslink — the pipeline opposed by some hereditary Wet’suwet’en chiefs who are upset that the pipeline traverses through their unceded territory. The opposition has led to rail blockades across the country and has emerged as another flashpoint in the debate over Indigenous issues and resource development.

Project: WCC LNG
Cost: $25 billion
Lead company: Exxon Mobil Corp.

A proposed LNG export facility in Prince Rupert B.C. which was expected to export 15 million tonnes of natural gas per year, with room to expand to up to 30 million tonnes per year. It was being developed as a joint partnership between Exxon Mobil Corp. and its subsidiary the Calgary-based Imperial Oil Ltd. The project was shelved indefinitely in December 2018.



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