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GOLDSTEIN: Trudeau must choose between climate pledge and Alberta’s economy


The dilemma for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on climate change and energy policy comes down to this.

If he wants to meet the promises he’s made about reducing Canada’s industrial greenhouse gas emissions, he has to gut our oil and gas sector.

He also has to do it quickly and the consequences for Alberta’s economy, as well as Saskatchewan’s and Canada’s, will be severe.

Trudeau and his cabinet would have to reject the $20.6 billion Teck Frontier oilsands megaproject in Alberta, now up for approval after getting the go-ahead from federal regulators.

But even if the Liberals cancel that project, that wouldn’t reduce current emissions, just slow the increase of future ones.

To meet his 2030 target of cutting Canada’s current emissions to 30% below 2005 levels, Trudeau will have to eliminate the equivalent of 50 Teck oilsands megaprojects over the next decade, or five Teck megaprojects every year, for 10 years.

Even using the Trudeau government’s own projections of what emission levels will be in 2030, including projects it hasn’t started, it would still have to cut current emissions by the equivalent of 19 Teck-like megaprojects over 10 years, or almost two every year, for a decade.

To achieve his election promise of cutting Canada’s emissions to net zero by 2050, Trudeau would have to cut Canada’s emissions by the equivalent of 175 Teck-like megaprojects over the next 30 years — almost six Teck-like megaprojects annually, for three decades.

Canada has seven economic sectors that generate significant industrial emissions, but oil and gas has been the fastest-growing since 1990 and the largest since 2012.

Today, these emissions total 195 megatonnes annually, an 84% increase since 1990.

The second-largest is the transportation sector at 174 megatonnes of emissions annually, a 43% rise since 1990, but with stable emissions since 2012.

Emissions in the electricity, heavy industry and waste sectors have gone down since 1990, while emissions in the agriculture and building sectors haven’t grown significantly since 2005.

Technology in the oil and gas sector is constantly improving, reducing the carbon intensity of its emissions, meaning the energy required to produce a barrel of oil generates fewer emissions over time, but not enough to come close to meeting Trudeau’s 2030 and 2050 targets.

For that, Trudeau will have to slash current oil and gas production.

Trudeau’s dilemma is that while he has never acknowledged the severe economic consequences to the Alberta, Saskatchewan and Canadian economies of fulfilling his climate change promises, he also doesn’t have enough money — our money — to subsidize an industry his climate policies are designed to kill.

Last week we learned the price tag on completing the Trans Mountain pipeline the Trudeau government bought two years ago has increased to $12.6 billion, 70% higher than its original forecast.

A report by Reuters news said Trudeau and his cabinet are considering federal aid to Alberta if they decide to reject the Teck megaproject, with the Liberals divided on what to do when they announce their decision later this month.

Vetoing Teck would be widely seen in Alberta as a deliberate, possibly fatal blow to the province’s beleaguered economy by a vindictive Liberal government that no longer has a single seat there or in Saskatchewan.

Approving it would be viewed as a betrayal by those who supported the Liberals in last year’s election because of Trudeau’s promise to meaningfully address climate change.

Now, Trudeau has to pick a lane.

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Thanksgiving: Heavy Snow Closes I-5 ‘Grapevine’ North of Los Angeles



Heavy snow caused local authorities to close Interstate 5, the “Grapevine,” north of Los Angeles, as a winter storm continued to pound California on Thanksgiving morning.

Snow had already fallen in the area on Wednesday morning, as the storm began overnight, dumping rain on Los Angeles and snow on the surrounding mountains.

Local ABC affiliate KABC-7 reported Thursday:

Interstate 5 over the Grapevine has been closed Thursday morning due to heavy snow as a Thanksgiving storm continues hitting the area, authorities said.

The California Highway Patrol ordered the shut down of both directions of the freeway shortly before 4:40 a.m.

Authorities with Caltrans said it will assist vehicles already on the pass to the other side and then clear the roadway. It was not immediately known when lanes will open.

California High Patrol officers escorted drivers through the Grapevine for several hours amid heavy snowfall Wednesday morning.

Drivers were urged to use the Highway 101 as an alternative.

The Los Angeles Times reported that some ski resorts were forced to close because the snow was too heavy and blizzard conditions created logistical problems.

The winter weather may have caused nightmares for some Thanksgiving weekend travelers, but it is a boon to the state’s farmers and fisheries.

Thanksgiving is the traditional start of the rainy season. The state depends on winter precipitation to supply water to the rivers and reservoirs for the rest of the year.

Snow falling on the mountains is most important of all: aside from the benefit to ski resorts, the snowpack creates a vast natural reservoir that melts throughout the spring and early summer.

For five years, from 2011 to 2016, very little rain fell during the winter months, causing the worst drought in the state’s recent history.

However, since the winter of 2016-17, California has enjoyed rainy winters. In that sense, the winter of 2018-9 is off to a good start.

Joel B. Pollak is Senior Editor-at-Large at Breitbart News. He earned an A.B. in Social Studies and Environmental Science and Public Policy from Harvard College, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. He is a winner of the 2018 Robert Novak Journalism Alumni Fellowship. He is also the co-author of How Trump Won: The Inside Story of a Revolution, which is available from Regnery. Follow him on Twitter at @joelpollak.





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Climate Change Protesters Storm Field at Halftime of Harvard-Yale Football Game



NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — The 136th edition of The Game between Harvard and Yale has been delayed at halftime after protesters took over the field.

Students from both schools occupied midfield after the Yale band had finished performing. Some held banners asking their colleges to act on climate change and Puerto Rican debt relief.

“Hey hey, ho ho, fossil fuels have got to go,” some protesters chanted.

After a few minutes, hundreds more people stream onto the field. A public address announcement asked them to leave “as a courtesy to the players.”

“As a courtesy to both teams, the game must resume.”

Police were on standby.

With Yale hoping to clinch an Ivy League title, Harvard led 15-3 at halftime.





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