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Trump threatens to pull tax exemption for schools, colleges


In his push to get schools and colleges to reopen this fall, President Donald Trump is again taking aim at their finances, this time threatening their tax-exempt status.

Trump said on Twitter on Friday he was ordering the Treasury Department to re-examine the tax-exempt status of schools that he says provide “radical indoctrination” instead of education.

“Too many Universities and School Systems are about Radical Left Indoctrination, not Education,” he tweeted. “Therefore, I am telling the Treasury Department to re-examine their Tax-Exempt Status and/or Funding, which will be taken away if this Propaganda or Act Against Public Policy continues. Our children must be Educated, not Indoctrinated!”

The Republican president did not explain what prompted the remark or which schools would be reviewed. But the threat is just one more that Trump has issued against schools as he ratchets up pressure to get them to open this fall. Twice this week Trump threatened to cut federal funding for schools that don’t reopen, including in an earlier tweet on Friday.

It’s unclear, however, on what grounds Trump could have a school’s tax-exempt status terminated. It was also not clear what Trump meant by “radical indoctrination” or who would decide what type of activity that includes. The White House and Treasury Department did not immediately comment on the president’s message.

Previous guidance from the Internal Revenue Service lays out six types of activities that can jeopardize a nonprofit organization’s tax-exempt status, including political activity, lobbying and straying from the organization’s stated purpose.

But ideology is not on the IRS’s list, said Terry Hartle, senior vice president of the American Council on Education, which represents university presidents. Any review of a school’s status would have to follow previously established guidelines, he said.

“It’s always deeply troubling to have the president single out schools, colleges or universities in a tweet,” Hartle said. “Having said that, I don’t think anything will come of this quickly.”

In his latest threat, Trump revived his oft-repeated claim that universities are bastions of liberalism that stifle conservative ideas. He used the same argument last year when he issued an executive order telling colleges to ensure free speech on campuses or lose federal research funding.

His interest in colleges’ finances appears to have been renewed as several schools sue the Trump administration over new restrictions on international students. Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sued to block the policy earlier this week, followed by Johns Hopkins University on Friday. The University of California system has said it also plans to sue.

The universities are challenging new guidance issued by Immigration and Customs Enforcement saying international students cannot stay in the U.S. if they take all their classes online this fall. The policy has been viewed as an attempt to force the nation’s universities to resume classroom instruction this fall.

Under the rules, international students must transfer schools or leave the country if their colleges plan to hold instruction entirely online. Even if their schools offer a mix of online and in-person classes, foreign students would be forbidden from taking all their courses remotely.

The lawsuit from Harvard and MIT argue that the policy breaks from a promise ICE made in March to suspend limits around online education “for the duration of the emergency.”

Until Friday, Trump had mostly focused his efforts on reopening elementary and secondary schools as millions of parents wait to find out if their children will be in school this fall. He has insisted that they can open safely, and in a Friday tweet argued that virtual learning has been “terrible” compared with in-person instruction.

“Not even close! Schools must be open in the Fall. If not open, why would the Federal Government give Funding? It won’t!!!” he wrote. Trump issued a similar warning on Twitter on Wednesday, saying other nations had successfully opened schools and that a fall reopening is “important for the children and families. May cut off funding if not open!”

Trump has not said what funding he would withhold or under what authority. But White House spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany has said the president wants to use future coronavirus relief funding as leverage. McEnany said Trump wants to “substantially bump up money for education” in the next relief package, but only for schools that reopen.

“He is looking at potentially redirecting that to make sure it goes to the student,” McEnany said at a Wednesday press briefing. She added that the funding would be “tied to the student and not to a district where schools are closed.”

But Trump’s control over school funding is limited. The vast majority of funding for public elementary and secondary schools comes from state and local sources, and nonprofit colleges are more likely to rely on tuition or state aid than federal money.

His threats to withhold funding have been denounced by a growing array of education and health groups, including a medical association that the White House has repeatedly cited in its press to reopen schools.

In a joint statement with national education unions and a superintendents group, the American Academy of Pediatrics on Friday said decisions should be made by health experts and local leaders. The groups argued that schools will need more money to reopen safely during the coronavirus pandemic and that cuts could ultimately harm students.

“Public health agencies must make recommendations based on evidence, not politics,” the groups wrote. “Withholding funding from schools that do not open in person full-time would be a misguided approach, putting already financially strapped schools in an impossible position that would threaten the health of students and teachers.”

The American Academy of Pediatrics has supported a fall reopening, saying in June guidelines that schools should strive to start the academic year with their students “physically present in school.” Vice President Mike Pence, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and McEnany have repeatedly, and as recently as Wednesday, cited the group in defense of Trump’s approach.

But Friday’s statement acknowledged that it may be best for some schools to stay online. School leaders, health experts, teachers and parents should be at the center of reopening decisions, the groups said, “taking into account the spread of COVID-19 in their communities and the capacities of school districts to adapt safety protocols to make in-person learning safe and feasible.”

Some districts have already announced plans for only a partial reopening, with a mix of in-person and online instruction. New York City’s public school district, the nation’s largest, said students will be in classrooms two or three times a week and learn remotely between. DeVos has opposed that kind of approach, saying it fails students and taxpayers.



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Valentina Sampaio Is Sports Illustrated’s First Transgender Swimsuit Model



For Valentina Sampaio, smashing boundaries is becoming second nature.

The 23-year-old Brazilian native appears in a stunning beachside pictorial in Sports Illustrated’s 2020 Swimsuit Issue, becoming the first openly transgender model to appear in the magazine.

Sampaio, who became the first trans woman to model for Victoria’s Secret last year, opened up about her latest milestone on Instagram Friday. She said she was “excited and honored” to appear in the “groundbreaking” new issue of the magazine, on newsstands July 21.

In an essay that appears in Sports Illustrated alongside the photo spread, Sampaio explained how her personal experience as a trans woman had impacted her outlook on her modeling career.

“Being trans usually means facing closed doors to peoples’ hearts and minds,” she said. “We face snickers, insults, fearful reactions and physical violations just for existing. Our options for growing up in a loving and accepting family, having a fruitful experience at school or finding dignified work are unimaginably limited and challenging.”

“I recognize that I am one of the fortunate ones,” she added, “and my intention is to honor that as best I can.”

Speaking to “Good Morning America” Friday, Sampaio said she hoped to encourage others through her triumphs, too.

“It’s hard, but you have to [stay] strong,” she said. “We all are human. I love to see people, brands and companies more open to fearlessly embracing the trans community with compassion and respect.”

The news drew praise from a number of high-profile outlets, including Vogue and Vanity Fair. Meanwhile, GLAAD’s Anthony Ramos applauded the magazine for “recognizing the simple fact that trans women are women.”

“Talented women like Valentina Sampaio deserve to be spotlighted and given equal opportunities,” Ramos, who is the LGBTQ advocacy group’s head of talent, told HuffPost in an email. “Her work in Sports Illustrated Swimsuit is a significant step forward as the modeling industry continues its evolution on traditional standards of inclusion.”





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On Gil Scott-Heron and Global Protests


The recent global Black Lives Matter protests have prompted IR scholars and others to revisit the work of Malcolm X and the poetry of Gil Scott-Heron. In one of his prison letters, Malcolm X wrote that he became “a real bug for poetry. When you think back over all of our past lives, only poetry could best fit into the vast emptiness created by men.” Later in his life, Malcolm X sought to internationalize the plight of African Americans. For example, at the Organization of African Unity in 1964, he exhorted the African diplomats and others that “We, in America, are your long lost brothers and sisters, and I am here to remind you that our problems are your problems.” Malcolm X looked to internationalize the sensibilities of the attendees by saying of African Americans: “We stand defenseless at the mercy of American racists who murder us at will for no reason other than we are black and of African descent.” Before his assassination, Malcolm X pushed for centers for black artistic expression as part of a means to connect black people throughout the globe. After his death, “this energy coalesced into the Black Arts Movement.” In this movement, poetry and other forms of art were critical to speaking truth to power and working toward justice for the dispossessed and disenfranchised—domestically and globally.

Gil Scott-Heron is perhaps one of the most famous artists influenced by this movement. In this essay, we briefly outline why we have turned to Gil Scott-Heron’s poetry in the classroom. His poetry, inspired by Malcolm X, is particularly relevant to this moment as we witness the momentum of Black Lives Matter protests happening in all 50 states and all over the world from Belgium to Brisbane. Thousands marched in Paris. From Kentucky to Canada, from Fresno to Frankfurt thousands are looking at the police brutality visited upon African Americans and seeing similarities to how state-sponsored police forces act against people of color and poor people in their own milieu. Chinese, Russian, and Iranian diplomats are focusing attention, however fleeting and for their own purposes, on the treatment of African Americans. In the classroom, whom might we listen to and how might we speak about these global protests? Gil Scott-Heron, we think, helps us confront the complexities of this moment.

Throughout this year, we have been co-teaching a “Poetry and Politics” seminar. One of the poems that we have been teaching together is Scott-Heron’s “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised.” The poem is helpful in thinking about this global moment of Black Lives Matter for several reasons.

First, it helps us think critically about the media’s focus on looting rather than structural sources of protests and riots (“There will be no pictures of you and Willie Mae pushing that shopping cart down the block on the dead run / Or trying to slide that color TV into a stolen ambulance”). As we witnessed in recent weeks, the media tends to zoom in on certain newsworthy effects (e.g. fires, looting, and property damage) of structural racism rather than structural racism itself. The Revolution tells us that “there will be no pictures of pigs shooting down brothers on the instant replay.” The Revolution prompts a discussion about the reasons for the disparaging term for police, and, more importantly, pushes us to reflect on the many black men (and women) killed not only by law enforcement officers but by law enforcement structures—portrayed in certain media reports as though these killings are a sport replete with “instant replay.”

Second, Scott-Heron offers a poetic window into divisions within black movements, reminding us of how these movements are never monolithic and often have different objectives (or means of achieving them). For example, The Revolution involves a biting critique of civil rights leaders Roy Wilkins and Whitney Young. During the heady days of the orthodox civil rights movement, the grassroots activities were led by the “Big Six.” Amongst the Big Six were longtime labor organizer A. Philip Randolph, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., James Farmer, and a young John Lewis. Scott-Heron turns his pen towards the last two of the “Big Six:” Whitney Young and Roy Wilkins of the National Urban League and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, respectively.

Scott-Heron’s pen grows teeth when he writes “there will be no pictures of Whitney Young being run out of Harlem on a rail with a brand new process. There will be no slow motion or still lifes of Roy Wilkins strolling through Watts in a red, black and green liberation jumpsuit that he has been saving for just the proper occasion.” Why does Scott-Heron use his pen to bite two of the most respected leaders of the civil rights movement? While Young and Wilkins were symbols of articulate moral leadership and effective advocacy in black communities, Scott-Heron muses about Young in a process (straightened hair) and Wilkins in a Bendera flag jumpsuit. Young and Wilkins were always seen in a dark fitted suit with a white shirt, a thin dark tie, and close-cropped natural hair. Putting them in a process and a multi-colored jumpsuit is arguably worse than putting them in a red nose with big floppy shoes piled up in a Volkswagen bug.

Why this imagery? Here, we see Scott-Heron launching two critiques. First, he is voicing a common criticism that Young and Wilkins were too close to white philanthropy to provide effective street-based leadership for black communities. Second, Scott-Heron is identifying both Young and Wilkins as outside the revolution, as irrelevant to the revolution and likely even as counter-revolutionaries that should be scorned by politicized black communities.

Using Young and Wilkins as stand-ins to criticize the “establishment” leadership of the “Big Six,” Scott-Heron turns his lens on the social and class divisions in black communities and finds a key fissure between middle-class blacks and the identity of the communities that birthed them. For students unaware of these kinds of divisions, Scott-Heron could prompt conversations about how and why they emerge, and also what they mean for bringing about both domestic and global change.

Third, Scott-Heron is pressing us to consider how black struggles can be domesticated or commercialized. As the world watches the protests and “instant replays” of George Floyd’s murder, we might ask what it means that “the revolution will not be televised?” The world finally seems to be watching. But what are we watching? Who is watching and what do we see (and fail to see)? Scott-Heron tells us that “the revolution will not go better with Coke.” How might revolution be domesticated by calls for cosmetic improvements without deeper systemic change? How might revolution be commercialized and co-opted? The Revolution leaves us searching—pragmatically and imaginatively—for difficult answers to so many pressing questions.

Considering The Revolution in the context of Black Lives Matter also reminds us of the deep connections between black political struggles in the United States and global struggles discussed within the annals of black political thought. W. E. B. DuBois held the first of the historic Pan African Conferences in 1919 locating the plight of African Americans within the overall anti-colonial struggle. The clergyman and diplomat Alexander Crummell wrote about internationalizing the anti-racist/anti-fascist struggle of African Americans in 1861 in his letter, The Relations and Duties of Free Colored Men in America to Africa. And as early as 1852, the veritable “Father of Pan Africanism” Martin Delany published The Condition, Elevation, Emigration, and Destiny of the Colored People of the United States, where he says the facts of American oppression of African Americans are plain and the goal is to “proclaim in tones more eloquently than thunder” that this treatment requires an international reaction.

The Black Lives Matter movement, emerging from black struggles in the streets of the United States, has become a global response to systemic racism. The death of Adama Traoré outside of Paris is seen as connected to the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Chants in Paris include the phrase, “Justice pour Adama, Justice pour George Floyd, Justice pour Tous!” How do we respond to this moment in the classroom? A turn to poets like Gil Scott-Heron, we believe, is one productive way to reflect on this juncture. His poems distilled wordplay, irony, anger, intellect, and lament into some of the most illuminating poems and songs ever produced in the world. While his work contends with the sociopolitical brutalities of racism, it also signals toward the possibilities (and impossibilities) of change—in the world and within ourselves. As we read his poetry with students in the context of Black Lives Matter, change in the world (we hope) becomes more possible.

Guided by the spirits of Malcolm X and Gil Scott-Heron, we are searching, together. What will we find? What will we create? How might poems of the past and present inform and inspire the change we are working toward?

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Donald Trump news: President unleashes fury at “corrupt” New York after supreme court rule | World | News


The court’s decision follows demands issued by Manhattan lawyer Cy Vance Jr, who demanded Trump’s accounting firm Mazars USA hand over the President’s financial documents.

The Supreme Court’s ruling yesterday mean Mr Vance will be able to go back to court and have his demand enforced.

Mr Trump issued a series of ferocious tweets in response to the court’s decision.

He wrote: “Courts in the past have given “broad deference”. BUT NOT ME!

“This is all a political prosecution. I won the Mueller Witch Hunt, and others, and now I have to keep fighting in a politically corrupt New York. Not fair to this Presidency or Administration!

Mr Trump’s ‘Mueller Witch Hunt’ statement references a past legal case brought against him involving Russian interference in his election.

READ: Trump attempt to scrap DACA immigration programme blocked by Supreme Court

However, reports have emerged claiming the court’s ruling could affect the President’s bid for re-election.

Despite the court ruling that New York investigators may be allowed to see Mr Trump’s financial records, judges decided other investigators were not.

CNBC reports the Supreme Court blocked similar demands by Democrats in the US House of Representatives.

Mr Trump’s lawyer Jay Sekulow claimed this was a victory for the president.

Mr Sekulow said he was pleased the Supreme Court had “temporarily blocked” the US Democrats’ demands.

All of the cases against Mr Trump discussed in the ruling involved subpoenas – demands for certain documents to be handed over.

According to reports, two such demands were issued by the US financial services and intelligence committees.

These demands attempted to get banks to hand over information on Mr Trump and his family.





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At IEA Summit, UN chief urges countries to scrap coal, boost clean energy transition



United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres urged countries on July 9 to invest in reliable, clean and economically smart renewable energy.

“I am encouraged that some COVID response and recovery plans put the transition from fossil fuels at their core,” he said at the first-ever International Energy Agency (IEA) Clean Energy Transitions Summit.

At a virtual meeting chaired by IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol, ministers representing over 80% of the global economy discussed how to achieve a definitive peak in global carbon dioxide emissions and put the world on course for a sustainable and resilient recovery.

EU Energy Commissioner Kadri Simson participated as well as ministers from the world’s largest energy users, including, China, United States, India, Japan, United Kingdom, Brazil, Canada, Italy, South Africa, Mexico, Indonesia and Spain.

Speakers highlighted that the IEA Summit comes at a pivotal moment when the world faces urgent and shared challenges to build back economies, create jobs and accelerate clean energy transitions, the IEA said in a press release.

Guterres noted that the EU and the Republic of Korea have committed to green recovery plans. Nigeria has reformed its fossil fuel subsidy framework. Canada has placed climate disclosure conditions on its bail-out support.

“And a growing number of coalitions of investors and real economy stakeholders are advocating for a recovery aligned with the goals of the Paris Agreement. But many have still not got the message. Some countries have used stimulus plans to prop up oil and gas companies that were already struggling financially. Others have chosen to jumpstart coal-fired power plants that don’t make financial or environmental sense,” Guterres said, citing new research on G20 recovery packages released this week, which shows that twice as much recovery money — taxpayers’ money – has been spent on fossil fuels as clean energy.

“Today I would like to urge all leaders to choose the clean energy route for three vital reasons — health, science and economics,” the UN Secretary General said.

He warned that worldwide, outdoor air pollution is causing close to 9 million early deaths every year and shortening human lifespans by an average of three years.

Moreover, he noted that all around the world, every month, there is new evidence of the increasing toll of climate disruption. “We must limit temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius to avert more and worse disasters. This means net-zero emissions by 2050, and 45 percent cuts by 2030 from 2010 levels. This is still achievable,” Guterres said.

He stressed that clean energy makes economic sense. “Per kilowatt hour, solar energy is now cheaper than coal in most countries. If we had any doubt about the direction the wind is blowing, the real economy is showing us. The business case for renewable energy is now better than coal in virtually every market. Fossil fuels are increasingly risky business with fewer takers,” he said.

The IEA Executive Director issued a first call in March to put clean energy at the heart of the Covid-19 recovery. This early marker was followed by a comprehensive series of ‘damage assessments’ for how the crisis is impacting all fuels and all technologies; actionable recommendations for economic recovery plans; and the full utilisation of the IEA’s ever-growing convening power, the EIA said.

The World Energy Investment report in May warned of a 20% plunge in global energy investment in 2020, with worrying implications for clean energy transitions and security.

The IEA’s Sustainable Recovery Plan sets out 30 actionable, ambitious policy recommendations and targeted investments. The Plan, developed in cooperation with the International Monetary Fund, would boost global economic growth by 1.1% per year, save or create 9 million jobs per year, and avoid a rebound in emissions and put them in structural decline. Achieving these results would require global investment of USD 1 trillion annually over the next three years.

According to the IEA’s Sustainable Recovery Plan, 35% of new jobs could be created through energy efficiency measures and another 25% in power systems, particularly in wind, solar and modernising and strengthening electricity grids. Participants at the IEA summit underlined the particular importance of energy efficiency, and expressed appreciation for the work of the Global Commission for Urgent Action on Energy Efficiency.

In the Summit’s High-Level Panel on Accelerating Clean Energy Technology Innovation, co-chaired by Norway’s Minister of Petroleum Tina Bru and Chile’s Energy Minister Juan Carlos Jobbed participants commended the new Energy Technology Perspectives Special Report on Clean Energy Innovation, which shows the vital importance of innovation for meeting shared energy and climate goals, the IEA said. Participants drew upon the IEA’s five key innovation principles and discussed how to scale up critical emerging technologies like batteries; hydrogen; carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS); and bioenergy.

In the High-Level Panel on an Inclusive and Equitable Recovery, co-chaired by Canada’s Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan of and Morocco’s Energy, Mining, and Sustainable Development Minister Aziz Rabbah, participants discussed the need to put people at the centre of recovery plans, including the most vulnerable, in order to fully harness diverse talents, backgrounds and perspectives. According to the IEA, they underscored the need to protect workers in the short term and to develop skills necessary for the sustainable, resilient energy systems of the future. Participants reinforced the importance of having a clear understanding for how to advance inclusive growth and to track progress, and held up the Equal by 30 campaign to advance gender equality as a valuable model.

Also, in the the High-Level Panel on a Resilient and Sustainable Electricity Sector co-chaired by Commissioner Simson and Thailand’s Energy Minister Sontirat Sontijirawong, participants recognised how indispensable electricity has been for citizens across the world during the crisis. A number of participants emphasised the transition towards a climate-neutral economy, the IEA said, adding that they noted the crucial role of electricity in clean energy transitions, participants underscored the historic opportunity to modernise and improve the sustainability, reliability and security of electricity systems with a diverse generation mix and higher flexibility to integrate larger shares of variable renewables.



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Boots to cut 4,000 jobs as John Lewis to shut eight stores, putting 1,300 jobs at risk – business live | Business


British health and beauty retailer Boots plans to cut 4,000 jobs and close 48 optician stores, in the latest major blow to the country’s retail sector from the COVID-19 crisis.

British brands including John Lewis and Harrods have announced thousands of job cuts in the last two weeks after the pandemic forced customers to shop online and many remained reluctant to return to the high street even as restrictions eased.

Walgreens Boots Alliance, the owner of the retailer, said on Thursday its most significant COVID-19 impact had come in Britain, with footfall down 85% in April, forcing it to take an impairment charge of $2 billion.



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Jeet Heer, Margaret Atwood, David Frum, Malcolm Gladwell and other defenders of open debate get their wish


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An open letter denouncing social restrictions on free speech and public debate, signed by more than 150 writers, academics, public intellectuals and other specialists, is sparking ample debate, although not all of it the sort its authors likely hoped for.

Published online by Harper’s magazine, “A Letter on Justice and Open Debate” was signed by people as famous as author J.K. Rowling, Noam Chomsky, Margaret Atwood and Salman Rushdie, and as unexpected as jazz musician Wynton Marsalis and choreographer Bill T. Jones.

As befits a manifesto, the current wave of protest and social activism is described as “a moment.” The anti-racism movement is “powerful,” demands for police reform are “overdue” and calls for wider inclusion across society is part of a “needed reckoning,” the letter declares.

But there’s a “but.”

“But this needed reckoning has also intensified a new set of moral attitudes and political commitments that tend to weaken our norms of open debate and toleration of differences in favor of ideological conformity.”



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Democracy, budget, solidarity, climate : what Europe post-Covid19 ?


In the long run, Europe has greatly contributed to the process of globalization that has been underway since the time of the great explorations. In a short time, Europe has been hit very hard by the pandemic and a historic recession is on the way.

Nothing prevents from reviving the plans of the European Community for Health  proposed in 1952. In economics, on the other hand, it is pointless to expect a new Marshall plan from the United States of America. 

This continent is not starting from scratch, Europe’s architects built a shared European house where peace, freedom, democracy, prosperity, the rule of law and a certain solidarity prevail. Determined, drawing their convictions from a shared trauma, that of the horrors of war, they were resistors and death camp survivors  and their ideals and values formed the backbone of the European Union. “Nothing is possible without men, nothing lasts without institutions” explained Jean Monnet who had imagined this organisation: a European Commission seeks the common European general interest and makes its proposals to the Ministers of States (Council) and citizens’ representatives (European Parliament) under the supervision of a Court of Justice. This revolutionary architecture – of shared sovereignty – has allowed to peacefully unite 27 countries, to conduct common policies (agriculture, Erasmus, trade, common currency, European GPS Galileo, research …) and to form regulations that inspire the whole world (data protection, energy efficiency, etc.).

Today the European Union needs progress to ensure autonomy and power to Europe. The time has come for new generations to live up to the European heritage. Taxation, budget, external or social action, the EU must decide more by (qualified) majority as unanimity is not democratic and does paralyze it. To move forward, energize industry and materialize a solidarity felt by everyone, its common economic capacity must be increased tenfold (the European budget weighs 1% of its wealth, against 24% for the American federal state) and the EU must be able to borrow.

A helping hand from Europe must definitively supplement the invisible hand – with shared unemployment insurance or a real supranational European reserve of citizens who can be mobilised during crises (doctors, firefighters, etc.) for example – to keep European peoples hopes up. The EU motto “United in diversity” could then be supplemented as follows: “United in diversity and solidarity”. Europeans have the means to be united without being uniform, in solidarity rather than solitary, democrats rather than vetocrats, but there is still an additional meaningful role to be found, an universal ambition to meet its historical greatness.

The Covid-19 has revealed Europe’s vulnerability. It should be better prepared for the crises on which scientists alert us, and climate change is the most frightening: collapse of ecosystems, inhabitable regions, fall in agricultural yields if we continue the current trajectory. Therefore the EU must urgently mobilise all its tools for economic recovery and debt to fight global warming through a decarbonised and fair transition. The EU has an historic opportunity to do so and a duty to the younger generations from whom budgets will be borrowed. The “never again” united its oldest ones, the “everything but not that” linked to an uncontrollable climate change unites all Europeans today (93% according to a survey).

Just seventy years ago, six European countries gathered around the shared management of coal to maintain peace between states, Europe must now clearly unite towards full decarbonisation in 2050 to save ecosystems, but also and above all convince and inspire the world to take action. There will be no prosperity, no resilience of humanity without protected ecosystems. Like Ulysses after a long journey, the European civilisation will only have a lasting existence by completing this last test which will bring it the recognition of all.

This generation is the last to be in capacity to act, so let’s be bold, ambitious and inspiring, keeping in mind the words of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry: “We do not inherit the earth from our parents, we borrow it from our children”.



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Kate Garraway masks up as she heads to Global after returning to GMB


Kate Garraway rocked a stunning dress as she headed to Global (Picture: Backgrid)

Kate Garraway as been spotted masking up as she heads to Global, keeping busy as she returns to Good Morning Britain.

The presenter could be seen donning a bright floral dress with white heeled boots, and wearing a mask as she headed into the building.

Clutching a big handbag, she waved at the cameras, before adjusting her mask.

The mum-of-two, who has been taking time off from hosting the morning show during her husband Derek Draper’s coronavirus battle, recently announced she’d be returning.

The presenter confirmed she will be back on the ITV programme on Monday alongside Ben Shephard as Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid take their summer break.

Visit our live blog for the latest updates: Coronavirus news live

Appearing on Wednesday’s episode Kate said: ‘I’m gonna come back, I’m afraid. I’m back on Monday if you’ll have me. I haven’t got the fight to be a Piers Morgan but I’m back with Ben Shephard.’

Kate sported a mask as she headed into the building (Picture: BACKGRID)
She waved to the cameras as she headed into the building (Picture: BACKGRID)

‘It’s lovely to be back. It’s like coming out a little bubble of sadness,’ she said. She is returning after doctors told her to ‘get on’ while her husband Derek Draper remains in ‘critical condition’.

Derek, Kate’s husband of 10 years, has been in intensive care since April, after testing positive for coronavirus.

Kate is returning to Good Morning Britain on Monday (Picture: BACKGRID)
She recently opened up to Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid about Derek’s coronavirus battle (Picture: GC Images)

He is now free of the virus, but has suffered complications, and was in an induced coma until recently.

Kate recently opened up about staying hopeful, explaining to Hello!: ‘We’re keeping positive and doing everything we can to bring him round.

More: Coronavirus

‘The children and I communicate with him every day on FaceTime, while a nurse holds his iPad.

‘I really believe he can hear. When medical staff say: “Good morning, Derek”, he sometimes opens his eyes. We and the doctors are doing everything we can so that he can start to recover.’

Got a story?

If you’ve got a celebrity story, video or pictures get in touch with the Metro.co.uk entertainment team by emailing us [email protected], calling 020 3615 2145 or by visiting our Submit Stuff page – we’d love to hear from you.

MORE: Kate Garraway still fears going to pubs and confirms she also had coronavirus alongside husband Derek Draper

MORE: Kate Garraway battling to visit husband Derek in hospital as he fights for life in coma: ‘You can shop in Primark but I can’t hug him’





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Video shows fatal restraint of Cornelius Fredericks, 16, in Michigan foster facility



At least six staff members at a Michigan youth facility restrained a Black teenager until he lost consciousness, security camera video of the fatal incident released Tuesday shows.

Cornelius Fredericks, 16, died in a hospital two days after staff members at Lakeside Academy in Kalamazoo, which houses children in the foster care and juvenile justice systems, tackled Cornelius and restrained him for 12 minutes, allegedly for throwing a sandwich. The medical examiner ruled his death a homicide.

The video, which does not include audio, shows that immediately after Cornelius threw the sandwich at another teen in the cafeteria on April 29, a staff member took him out of his seat and onto the floor. For the next several minutes, at least six staff members held Cornelius on the ground, the video shows. After releasing him, staff members are seen trying to resuscitate him before the video clip ends.

Last month, the Kalamazoo County prosecutor charged staff members Zachary Raul Solis, 28, and Michael Joshua Mosley, 47, with involuntary manslaughter and second-degree child abuse for their part in the restraint. The prosecutor also charged Heather Newton McLogan, 48, a nurse, with involuntary manslaughter and second-degree child abuse, alleging that she failed to seek timely medical care; she did not call 911 until 12 minutes after the restraint ended.

The three staff members who were charged have not yet entered pleas, but their attorneys have indicated that they intend to fight the prosecutions.

Cornelius Fredericks.Family photo

Cornelius’ family filed a civil lawsuit against Lakeside Academy and Sequel Youth and Family Services, which operates the facility, on June 22, seeking damages. The family’s attorney, Geoffrey Fieger, said he obtained security video of the restraint from the prosecutor’s office.

At least three of the male staff members who “improperly restrained” Cornelius were over 6 feet tall and weighed 215 pounds or more, according to a June 17 state investigation report, which concluded that Lakeside Academy failed to follow state licensing rules on restraints.

Staff members told state investigators that Cornelius threatened to attack them when they released him from the restraint. However, the family’s lawsuit says that Cornelius was already struggling and that he said “I can’t breathe” while he was restrained. After releasing Cornelius, staff members tried to sit him up, but his body fell back limp, the video shows. Cornelius urinated on himself during the restraint, Fieger said Tuesday.

“Unless you shine a light on insects and maggots, they proliferate,” Fieger told reporters on a teleconference call Tuesday. “Certainly this type of behavior is not human. It can only be akin to a subhuman-type species that would inflict this behavior on children.”

Sequel fired 10 employees of Lakeside Academy, including the three facing criminal charges.

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In a statement, Sequel called Cornelius’ death “senseless and tragic” and said, “The actions taken by the staff members in that video do not adhere to the Sequel and Lakeside Academy policies and procedures.” The statement added that Lakeside Academy staff members were trained in the company’s de-escalation techniques and that restraints should be used only when children are threats to themselves or others. A restraint “is not an appropriate first response,” Sequel said.

Sequel declined to comment on the litigation.

No one answered the phone Tuesday at Lakeside Academy. All residents were removed from the facility following Cornelius’ death.

Kiana Garrity, an attorney for Mosley, said the video does not show that Cornelius made threats against his peers before throwing food. “They did not restrain him for throwing food as alleged,” Garrity said. “That’s a made-up narrative by Lakeside. They’re lying through their teeth to cover their policies.”

Donald Sappanos, an attorney for Solis, said all three staff members would be acquitted because they followed the rules in the employee handbook.

Anastase Markou, McLogan’s lawyer, said his client is the only one who called 911 and that she is being blamed because she waited too long. “She’s been accused of not doing something based on some form of legal duty, which I’m still trying to decide what legal duty she had,” Markou said.

McLogan told state investigators that she initially thought Cornelius was “faking” his loss of consciousness. Video shows McLogan performing CPR on Cornelius before paramedics arrived.

The restraint lasted 12 minutes, a state investigation found, but the video shows only 8 minutes of it. Fieger said he does not know why the video is incomplete and contains jump cuts, but his office is having a digital forensic examiner review the file. Fieger said he had to get a copy of the video from the prosecutor’s office because Sequel would release it only if he agreed not to share it with the public.

“They’re very worried about their financial impact,” Fieger said. “I’ve seen zero concern from them in terms of the abuse of children.”

Lakeside Academy in Kalamazoo, Mich.Wood TV 8

Sequel did not respond to Fieger’s statement about the video.

When paramedics arrived, they gave Cornelius several doses of epinephrine, and he regained a pulse. But his condition declined after he was taken to a hospital, and he died May 1, according to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

The video shows that many other youths watched staff members restrain Cornelius while they continued to eat their lunches for several minutes, until staff members began directing them to leave the room.

Cornelius was placed at Lakeside Academy as a ward of the state after his mother died and the state deemed his father unable to care for him. Unlike some of the other children housed there, he was not involved in the juvenile justice system.

An NBC News investigation last year found that multiple children have complained that staff members at Sequel-run facilities in other states used inappropriate physical restraints to control children, in some cases resulting in loss of consciousness. A former staffer at a Sequel facility in Iowa told NBC News that she saw staff members use improper and physically abusive restraints on children throughout the approximately seven months she worked there.

Sequel said last year that it would begin using a trauma-informed approach to crisis management that minimizes the use of restraint at all of its facilities nationwide.

Following Cornelius’ death, the company said in a statement, “We have accelerated the work that was already underway across our organization to move to a restraint-free model of care at every Sequel program.”

The Department of Health and Human Services moved to revoke Lakeside Academy’s license following Cornelius’ death. Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, has asked the department to ensure that Sequel no longer works with the state.



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